I agree with the above comments.  Interestingly, I recently needed to
re-create a super 8 look for a film being shot on the Alexa.  I argued for
actual Super 8, as that is the best way to achieve the look, but was not
able to convince them.  Anyway, I shot the sequence at 18fps and then
transferred back to 24 in post, adding frames as you would if transferring
from Super 8.  I also shot it at a low ASA to compress the dynamic range,
overexposed the highlights and extended the shutter speed.  In the end it
was pretty convincing, but I think the biggest convincing factor was the
18fps.

On Mon, Aug 8, 2016 at 2:36 PM, Francisco Torres <fjtorre...@gmail.com>
wrote:

> I have given it some thought and so far what I have noticed is that
> digital projection is very different from film projection, so even ''24
> fps'' mean very different things in each. You discussed the reasons why in
> your OP so I will not go over them again, what I think is that there is
> nothing in digital projection like the effect those film makers achieved
> with film projection. Plus there are issues regarding how film was exposed
> in the camera itself...  So to achieve those kind of effects will require a
> whole new and different practice in digital media.
>
> 2016-08-08 10:48 GMT-04:00 Robert Withers <withe...@earthlink.net>:
>
>> Looking for information . . . writings . . . practices . . . thoughts . .
>> .
>> In film practice, certain artists such as Frampton, Sharits, Conrad,
>> Lawder and others (even myself) sometimes built film rhythms based on the
>> 24 fps rate, choosing shots or images of specific frame lengths (1, 2, 4,
>> 8, 24, etc) for specific effects. The effect in projection was also
>> modulated by the projection technology, which would typically project each
>> film frame more that one time, with a black interval in between. We had
>> different kinds of flicker effects interacting with the
>> psychological/perceptual phenomenon of persistence of vision, with the odd
>> result that audiences in a movie theater would be sitting in total darkness
>> for a portion of any film screening, watching the images that persisted in
>> their brains.
>>
>> Now in digital cinema there is a choice of "standard" frame rates,
>> especially 24 fps and 30 fps, modulated to a more unpredictable effect by
>> use of displays and digital projection systems, which have been
>> standardized in commercial cinema theaters but not in all systems. So 8
>> frame sequences in 24 fps digital could conceivably have a different flavor
>> than in 30 fps sequences. In digital display there is no more effect from
>> closed film projection shutters: digital frames are projected in sequence
>> with no significant interval between. (*Pace* the blanking interval.)
>> Hence digital cinema is typically always "on" with no intrinsic (even if
>> unperceived) flicker. Further, there are automatic background manipulations
>> done by some display technologies that convert between 24 fps, 30 fps, 60
>> interlaced fps, etc., without the viewer being aware of this or tipped off
>> in any way.
>>
>> I'd be very interesting in hearing about anyone who is writing,
>> practicing, or thinking about these issues, and any references.
>>
>> Many thanks,
>> Robert Withers
>>
>> cinesouvenir.com
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> FrameWorks mailing list
>> FrameWorks@jonasmekasfilms.com
>> https://mailman-mail5.webfaction.com/listinfo/frameworks
>>
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> FrameWorks mailing list
> FrameWorks@jonasmekasfilms.com
> https://mailman-mail5.webfaction.com/listinfo/frameworks
>
>
_______________________________________________
FrameWorks mailing list
FrameWorks@jonasmekasfilms.com
https://mailman-mail5.webfaction.com/listinfo/frameworks

Reply via email to