To put it simply, do you create the rules, then make the outline, then fill in the blanks and modify them to follow the rules?

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----- Original Message ----- From: "Thomas Ward" <thomasward1...@gmail.com>
To: "Gamers Discussion list" <gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Sunday, February 15, 2009 9:03 AM
Subject: Re: [Audyssey] what's involved in making a game?


Hi Shaun,

Quote
tom I think the first question should be what was the first thing you coded, or the first part of the game minor or major did you do first, ie the menu, the interface,
etc.
End quote

Well, if you are starting a game from scratch you can't really jump in and start programming menus etc. You have to program the more low level portions of the game such as global variables, classes, objects, etc. You really can't do anything until you have created the foundation classes that the program/game runs on. You can't create player's, enemy monsters, or even menus until you work on the classes that stores all the information for the game. Let's explain this in
English instead of techno speak.
Most modern languages such as C#, Java, VB 2008, etdc are created using a programming methodology called object oriented programming. Objecs are simply people, places, and things that make up your game world. The main character is an object, your weapons might be objects, all enemies might be objects, the game world itself might be an object, the Window that your game plays in is an object, etc. In other words you start with a simple idea, say a person, and then you set about creating that object from the ground up. You can't just create a game player character until you create its class which defines what a character is. Your main character class might have variables/functions which holds the character's location, health, direction facing, whatever. Once you have created the class containing all of the character's essential features then you can then create a new instance of that character called an object. The object therefore is the character we want and its class describes or defines what that character is or can do. Bottom line, you have to start by defining what things are before you can actually create them. I know this probably sounds more complicated than it really is. In fact, object oriented programming is much easier, less complicated, and more programmer friendly than older procedural languages. There are lots and lots of reasons why object oriented programming is all around better, and why object oriented style programming is much more common today then procedural programming. Main reason is everything is arranged by class and object type which allows you to work directly with concepts like a game window, person, place, or thing rather than a bunch of variables and functions tossed together in a source file that may or might not be related.
HTH.


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