Cool.

Will just say started off in commodore basic, then moved over to GWBasic/QBasic and then Borland TurboPascal and TurboBasic, on PCs, and then over to VBScript within classic ASP along with backend components in VB6 as well as V B A Applications within MSAccess and MSWord, and then over to things like VB.Net and currently C# within .Net web applications, and currently windows apps and WPF applications (new and still trying to tes/get working), and along the lines also currently do a bit in PHP and MySQL, but there are most likely a few other languages/platforms tried out along the way that don't really remember too much of, like a little bit of machine code (debug in dos), a bit of coldfusion web development, and the one other language would still like to actually make use of is Python since it's not really limited to platforms as such - one day.


I currently either make use of sound clips (my virtual environment static web page engine will be done soonish), or use Jamal's SayTools to make someone's screen reader or the SAPI voices speak for me, but primarily want to at the moment make normal user interfaces that sighted and VI users will both be able to use in the same way, but apart from my own silly version of snakes and ladders using the original playing board image etc. along with smiley face characters, I haven't really done any game programming since this was more of a test to try out making a screen reader talk while also maybe targeting sighted kiddies to give them an idea of how we use computers.

Along the lines of that one, suppose will mention that have literally only been making use of screen readers and other accessibility products around 3 years now since literally only got out of hospital around 3 years and 8 months ago after the motorcycle accident that put me where I am now...LOL!

Means never really even knew narrator existed on my windows XP machines, etc., so still trying to learn etc., but suppose the one advantage is have pretty much always been into discussion groups etc. since the internet arrived this side of the world around 1996.

Stay well

Jacob Kruger
Blind Biker
Skype: BlindZA
'...fate had broken his body, but not his spirit...'

----- Original Message ----- From: "Jim Kitchen" <j...@kitchensinc.net>
To: "Jacob Kruger" <Gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2009 12:23 PM
Subject: [Audyssey] First computer


Hi Jacob,

I got my first PC in 1980. It was a Texas Instruments 99 4a home computer. It came with a Basic programming language and the manual had programming examples. I typed in the programming examples and experimented with them trying to learn what the different Basic commands did and how to use them. I also bought an Microsoft Extended Basic programming cartridge for it. The Texas Instruments 99 4a computer had no hard or floppy drive. I bought a cable that connected to a tape recorder and that was how I saved the games that I created on it. My second computer was an Atari 800 XL home computer. I also bought an Microsoft Extended Basic programming cartridge for it as well as many game cartridges and an external five and a quarter floppy drive unit. My next computer was an IBM PC Jr. It had a programming language named BasicA as well as GW Basic. It also had two five and a quarter floppy drives built in. I bought my first talking computer in December of 1989. It was an NEC 286 16 MHZ with a 20 meg hard drive. It ran Jaws for dos version 1.0 with an Accent SA hardware synthesizer. I programmed in GW Basic and Quick Basic 4.5 on it. At first I didn't know how to make Quick Basic programs work correctly with Jaws, so I wrote Jaws script files to go with the games. Later I did learn how to make the games work correctly with all of the dos screen readers. In the year 2000 I started writing games for windows in Visual Basic 4.0. I couldn't figure out how to make the games so that all of the windows screen readers would read the text, so I started making the games self voicing by use of recorded Eloquence speech. I am now creating the games for windows in Visual Basic 6.0 and using the Microsoft
sapi5 text to speech engine to make the games self voicing.

BTW The Atari 800 XL had 64k of ram just like the C64. It did not have a sound synthesizer like the C64, but did have 4 sound channels. I also had a speech synthesizer program for it. Not a screen reader. It would just say anything that you typed in.

BFN

    Jim

Kitchen's Inc, for games that are up to 110 percent funner to play.

j...@kitchensinc.net
http://www.kitchensinc.net
(440) 286-6920
Chardon Ohio USA
---
Gamers mailing list __ Gamers@audyssey.org
If you want to leave the list, send E-mail to gamers-unsubscr...@audyssey.org.
You can make changes or update your subscription via the web, at
http://audyssey.org/mailman/listinfo/gamers_audyssey.org.
All messages are archived and can be searched and read at
http://www.mail-archive.com/gam...@audyssey.org.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding the management of the list,
please send E-mail to gamers-ow...@audyssey.org.

__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 4622 (20091119) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com





__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature 
database 4622 (20091119) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com




---
Gamers mailing list __ Gamers@audyssey.org
If you want to leave the list, send E-mail to gamers-unsubscr...@audyssey.org.
You can make changes or update your subscription via the web, at
http://audyssey.org/mailman/listinfo/gamers_audyssey.org.
All messages are archived and can be searched and read at
http://www.mail-archive.com/gam...@audyssey.org.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding the management of the list,
please send E-mail to gamers-ow...@audyssey.org.

Reply via email to