Actually this is one of my main duties for audiogames.net, not just finding a game and saying "oy you, accessify this or else!" but thinking of reasonable changes that could be made to make it accessible.

For instance, in Core exiles, the part of the game Darren meant whas actually an equipment screen. Requesting that the developer fit text lables to over 2000 images denoting pieces of equipment would be beyond reason, so my initial request was to fit lables by type, ----- eg, armour, weapon etc.


As it turns out sinse the images are in fact tied to specific pieces of equipment specific lables were possible without needing to rewrite them, but if I'd initially asked the developer to hand lable 2000 images herself she'd have probably told me to get lost, ---- and who could blame her.

Thus, there is quite an element of give and take in this as well, pluss the need for players at least to have a theoretical understanding of how access features might work so that they can make helpful suggestions rather than just saying "do that!"

This is also the reason I'm eager for 7-128 to have guides to devs on this subject, to have a baseline to work from.

Beware the grue!

Dark.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Darren Harris" <darren_g_har...@btinternet.com>
To: "'Gamers Discussion list'" <gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Monday, November 29, 2010 2:34 PM
Subject: Re: [Audyssey] Accessibility and mainstream companies


Hi,

I also think it's a question as to how its put across.

For example, I play a game called core exiles, it can be found at
http://www.core-exiles.com

Up until a year or so ago, the developer had no idea as to what making a
game accessible was all about. Then the likes of dark and myself came along
and said hey we wana play too! Well anyway with time he responded and most
favourably and because we worked with him to help make it happen, the game
has become far more playable.

The problem is that making a game or any piece of software accessible is a
brand new concept and I think to be very honest with you that too many
people just expect it to be done rather than actually helping to bring about the end result. I'll give you an example, this morning 2 of us were helping
the developer over irc chat to make a part of core exiles that was useable
but not user friendly for screen readers to be much more user friendly. He
asked for our help which is right because at the end of the day it's us that needs it he isn't going to know if the changes he implements work or not is he. So if we hadn't have helped him I doubt very much that the tweeks would
have taken place. But because we did then not only did he do this, he's
going to be encouraged by it and as such we can get more things done.

It's a 2 fold problem. Yes people expect accessibility and I'm not saying
they shouldn't, but I also think that those who expect it need to help bring
it about in any way they can..

-----Original Message-----
From: gamers-boun...@audyssey.org [mailto:gamers-boun...@audyssey.org] On
Behalf Of Eleanor
Sent: 29 November 2010 14:22
To: gamers@audyssey.org
Subject: [Audyssey] Accessibility and mainstream companies


Neo said that :

*"Accessibility is something that has to be considered right at the
beginning of a game's development in order for it to be fully implemented.
And, yes, you're right sometimes it comes down to money."*

I have to agree with that statement completely.  It costs 7-128 Software
about 20% more time and effort to put in the accessibility features we
use in our games.  You have to want to do this - not just react to a few
people asking for it - because it costs us more to produce our games
than it would without accessibility features included.

What we need to do is to help game companies realize that it can be
profitable to add accessibility features to their games.

This means to:
     1. Prove that the number of possible consumers is enough to make
it profitable.

    2. Show that many of the accessibility features improve game-play
for all gamers.

    3. Show that *folks will buy their games* if they put in the
accessibility features to make it playable.

So far,  we have not been successful in doing this.  The IGDA
accessibility SIG has tried to demonstrate this as have other
organizations - but it is going to take a lot of effort (not merely
complaining) to help game companies to realize this.  And people have to
buy the games.

Eleanor Robinson
7-128 Software

---
Gamers mailing list __ Gamers@audyssey.org
If you want to leave the list, send E-mail to
gamers-unsubscr...@audyssey.org. You can make changes or update your
subscription via the web, at
http://audyssey.org/mailman/listinfo/gamers_audyssey.org.
All messages are archived and can be searched and read at
http://www.mail-archive.com/gam...@audyssey.org.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding the management of the list,
please send E-mail to gamers-ow...@audyssey.org.


---
Gamers mailing list __ Gamers@audyssey.org
If you want to leave the list, send E-mail to gamers-unsubscr...@audyssey.org.
You can make changes or update your subscription via the web, at
http://audyssey.org/mailman/listinfo/gamers_audyssey.org.
All messages are archived and can be searched and read at
http://www.mail-archive.com/gam...@audyssey.org.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding the management of the list, please send E-mail to gamers-ow...@audyssey.org.


---
Gamers mailing list __ Gamers@audyssey.org
If you want to leave the list, send E-mail to gamers-unsubscr...@audyssey.org.
You can make changes or update your subscription via the web, at
http://audyssey.org/mailman/listinfo/gamers_audyssey.org.
All messages are archived and can be searched and read at
http://www.mail-archive.com/gam...@audyssey.org.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding the management of the list,
please send E-mail to gamers-ow...@audyssey.org.

Reply via email to