Hi Laurel,

Well, to begin with when it comes to the subject of what programming
language/languages to use that depends on a lot of factors. Fact is if
you ask 10 programmers that question chances are you will get 10
different answers in return. That's because a lot of it comes down to
personal preference.

What I mean by that is you really have to know what exactly you want
the language to do, and what you find easiest to work with. For
instance, C-style languages like C++, Java, and C# .Net all have a
C-style syntax using lots of braces, brackets, and that sort of thing
to define blocks of code. Basic style languages such as Visual Basic
.Net uses a lot of words instead of symbols like Sub, End Sub, Class,
End Class, etc to begin and end blocks of code. Then, there are
languages like Python that have very little to no sintax at all and
you define blocks of code through spacing and indention. Obviously,
everyone has there preference which language is easiest to work with,
and some people like one coding convention over another. this makes
the choice extremely personal.

Other things to think about is what platform or platforms you will be
programming for, what tools are accessible for that language, and what
types of games you will be creating. This largely would effect what
languages you might choose to use as well.

For example, you mentioned writing text adventures. The easiest way to
do that is use one of the text adventure specific languages such as
Inform 7, create the adventure in the Inform IDE/Compiler, and then
run the file using your favorite Inform interpreter like Frotz,
Winfrotz, etc. Its not necessary to use an all purpose language like C
or C++ to write a text adventure unless of course you plan to write
several different types of games besides just text adventures.

Finally, as far accessibility goes you don't really have to have a big
fansy IDE to write games and other software. Mostly what you need is a
plane text editor like Windows Notepad to write the source code, IE
the stuff you can read, and then compile it with the compiler of your
choice. Accessibility is largely up to weather you feel more
comfortable with a graphical IDE/compiler or if you would rather work
with command line text tools.Most development software such as
Microsoft's Visual Studio come with both a graphical environment, and
an optional command line environment with  text only tools. So I think
the place to start is to figure out what language you want to work
with, and then find the tools that is most accessible for that
programming language.

Oh, and before I forget there is one other option that needs
mentioning. For a beginner thinking about creating Windows games
Philip Bennefall has created an accessible game programming engine
called BGT. At the moment its a Windows only product, but it might be
a good place to start.

Cheers!



On 11/20/11, Laurel <laurel.stock...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hello all,
> My name is Laurel and I just became a member of this list. I want to
> tame a moment and introduce myself to you all. I also have a few
> questions for you all.
> I am from Dallas Texas and am a third year university student. I study
> French and Russian and love learning languages! I use JAWS screen
> reader along with an iPhone. I have a yellow lab female guide dog from
> Guide Dogs for the Blind named Stockard.
> I am interested in learning to write and create text based games as
> well as iPhone applications and other accessible games for blind
> people. This leads me to my questions. /smiles/ I know that in order
> to write apps and games I need to learn a computer language so that I
> can code properly. I also know that there are a tun of computer
> programs out there that can help you write and design your games and
> apps. My first question is what are the computer programs out there
> that are the most JAWS accessible? I am having a hard time deciding
> whether I should try to use c++, java or what because I don't know
> what is good with JAWS. My second question is, I'm wondering if any of
> you would be willing to menter me some. Like I said, I'm just learning
> how to do this and I'm still learning the different computer languages
> used to create games/apps. So would somebody be willing to menter me
> and help me learn how to do this? Basically, I need somebody to help
> me get started and point me in the right direction as far as resources
> and helping me choose which programs to use, how to go about creating
> a game etc.
>
> Thanks,
> Laurel and Stockard
>
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