Am Donnerstag, 24. Januar 2002 21:55 schrieb Rich Shepard:
> On Thu, 24 Jan 2002, Peter Buckenleib wrote:
> > is there a way to correct optical distortions of wide-angle lenses
> > ( most annoing within architectural pics ) using gimp ?
>
> Peter,
>
>   That's an interesting idea. Have you thought of doing the
> correction as you take the photograph? If you keep the film plane
> parallel to the front of the building you won't have the distortion.
> Without a full, tilt-and-swing bellows arangement on your camera, you
> can do it by choosing the proper lens and shooting position. Of
> course, sometimes you just cannot get to the right position. :-)
>
>   Good luck!
>
> Rich
>
> Dr. Richard B. Shepard, President
>
>                        Applied Ecosystem Services, Inc. (TM)
>             2404 SW 22nd Street | Troutdale, OR 97060-1247 | U.S.A.
>  + 1 503-667-4517 (voice) | + 1 503-667-8863 (fax) |
> [EMAIL PROTECTED] http://www.appl-ecosys.com

Hello Dr. Shepard,

i think youre talking about the "Scheimpflug"-method. 

But i do not own a  camera that is capable of that (SINAR,Rollei, etc). 
These would be too heavy, complicated and time-consuming to be used at 
holliday-trips. I'm using a Minolta 800si and a SIGMA-Zoom (28-200).  

As long as i had time enough to convert my bathroom into a darkroom for 
days, i used a method like this to correct that distortion when 
exposing the prints. 

So i thought this could be done mathematically on the pixels in RAM. 
There are more than needed for a "close to chemical"-print since i got 
a Canon FS4000 filmscanner.


thanks for your  Mail

Peter


-- 
Peter Buckenleib
Am Europakanal 8
91056 Erlangen

Tel: 09131 992234
Fax: 09131 791045

Mail: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
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