You mean the farmer's big overshirt, right? (I ask because "smock" was also 
used as a term for a woman's shift or chemise, at least in parts of England. 
Read about smock races sometime.) Do you have the Shire album on the subject? 
 Also try "Dress of the People." I suspect the answer to your question, though, 
is probably not, but next to impossible to ferret out. If women did, they were 
probably rural residents doing hard work on farms, and, unless there is a stray 
traveler's account somewhere, unlikely to be recorded.

Ann Wass

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Susan <scour...@nwlink.com>
To: Historical Costume <h-cost...@indra.com>
Sent: Fri, Dec 18, 2015 12:10 am
Subject: Re: [h-cost] Who's still here?  & smock question

Hi all,
I'm still here.  I get fed up with facebook, and rarely with email lists, so 
happy to see people.

Since you're all here ...  I've just gotten interested in english smocks 
(18th - 19th c ones) and was debating making one. I've requested a bunch of 
books from the library, and this question might be answered in one of them. 
But ...

Did women wear the traditional smocks?  in any era?

thanks, Susan c (in seattle) 

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