Jenny,
The RIN is fairly stable but not completely.
As Ian Macaulay says, when you find you have duplicates, one RIN is lost and in addition may be re-assigned to someone in a completely different branch. Also occasionally people encounter errors that can only be fixed by exporting your Legacy file to a new Legacy file. The RIN is not necessarily preserved in this process though may be. At least now the Added Date is preserved when you do that. I recall having to use Microsoft Access to copy and paste them over to the relevant table as best I could.

Name files with a convention that makes sense to you.
I mainly name with a code for the content. eg GRO B[for birth] Harris 1857, eg 1871 Harris Uxbridge for an 1871 Census. I don't include Census or a code as I assume it for England but as I find people in Canadian censuses I will include CACen. For photos I start with a code indicating where the photo came from. eg the initials or name of the person. When I scanned I used the name and an increasing number. So eg Eva137. Later I added more detail to the filename. eg Marg 1962

Cathy
Ian Macaulay <mailto:macau...@icmac.ca>
Wednesday, 24 January 2024 8:55 AM
Merge comes quickly to mind.  Rins will get messed up. Especially when, as I do reusing all deleted numbers.



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      Ian Macaulay    of Carp, Ontario


bob jones <mailto:genealogyb...@gmail.com>
Tuesday, 23 January 2024 10:03 PM

Hi Jenny

I document my people by last name, first name, date of birth (or approximate if I don’t know it) so I can sort on time if I need to and then RIN number.  As you pointed out – it is unique and therefore can't be confused.  I hope others use it. Using the RIN number has often stopped me from making mistakes.  I also attach the RIN number to all my source file names and any other documents or photo file names I manage to collect over the years.

Bob Jones

Winchester Canada

*From: *LegacyUserGroup <legacyusergroup-boun...@legacyusers.com> on behalf of Jenny M Benson <ge...@cedarbank.me.uk>
*Date: *Tuesday, January 23, 2024 at 7:12 AM
*To: *Legacy User Group <legacyusergroup@legacyusers.com>
*Subject: *[LegacyUG] Unique identifier

I have just watched a Legacy webinar on document filing and whereas
there was a lot of good sense spoken, one thing stuck out to me as
ridiculous.

The present prefaced her document filenames with the surname, forename
and year of birth of the person concerned.  he went on to say that if
there was more than one person with the same names and date of birth she
would include the death year.  That's fine if you *know* the birth
and/or death year of people and in the days when choice of names was
limited and infant deaths  numerous, it would not be surprising to have
2 people of the same name being born and dying in the same years.  And
how often does one not know the birth and/or death year of a person?

Why on earth not use the unique identifier provided by Legacy - the RIN.
  This is generated by Legacy every time a new person is added to a file
(but the user has the option to swap these around if desired.)  Smith,
John 1234 or Doe, Jane 5678 is never going to be confused with anyone
else and is never going to change - even if you find out one day that
you have the wrong birth/death year for that person

I defy anyone to come up with a good reason why using the RIN is not the
best way to uniquely identify a person in a Legacy fie.  (There's a
challenge!)

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Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK

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Jenny M Benson <mailto:ge...@cedarbank.me.uk>
Tuesday, 23 January 2024 8:11 PM
I have just watched a Legacy webinar on document filing and whereas there was a lot of good sense spoken, one thing stuck out to me as ridiculous.

The present prefaced her document filenames with the surname, forename and year of birth of the person concerned.  he went on to say that if there was more than one person with the same names and date of birth she would include the death year.  That's fine if you *know* the birth and/or death year of people and in the days when choice of names was limited and infant deaths  numerous, it would not be surprising to have 2 people of the same name being born and dying in the same years.  And how often does one not know the birth and/or death year of a person?

Why on earth not use the unique identifier provided by Legacy - the RIN.  This is generated by Legacy every time a new person is added to a file (but the user has the option to swap these around if desired.)  Smith, John 1234 or Doe, Jane 5678 is never going to be confused with anyone else and is never going to change - even if you find out one day that you have the wrong birth/death year for that person

I defy anyone to come up with a good reason why using the RIN is not the best way to uniquely identify a person in a Legacy fie.  (There's a challenge!)



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