Agreed, Reputation is everything. It is why we only work with well known
Legacy IPv4 space at this time (hence, use anywhere statement). Our space
rents for about 4x other space found on other sites. We don't do the
volume business of our competitors. Those businesses with questionable
address space will always be around as there are always customers for
fast, cheap, without the good reputation. Most customers for that fast
cheap space have no clue how to verify space until a problem arises. After
the fact, they usually end up in trouble, spending much more money to not
only educate themselves but also on the labor involved in re-numbering.

About your second point  - "would rather have a block assigned by a
reputable upstream provider" - I agree, if it was for say a real estate
office access, one could simply ask everyone to wait it out or send
everyone home and ask them to use their DSL or cable operator when it's

We rent out /24s (and up) because some upstreams won't provide a full /24
and some of those networks send those customers to us. Do to the limited
IPv4 availability, many no longer entertain portability for their assigned
space. Multi-homing become issues of labor and they don't want to deal
with it with their assigned space. With one ASN announcing your space, it
means your down when they have maintenance or limited reach when they have
other routing issues. Today, it makes sense to go with quality wholesale
IPv4 space from a 3rd party. You can look at the IPs as an R.O.I
opportunity as customers understand supply-demand and will pay 10x for
space they need. It more than pays for itself in network reliability and
labor saved. For those that don't need multi-home today, it's wise to
consider expansion down the road and have already planned tomorrow's
improved network ability to multi-home. As the cost later to re-number to
multi-home. Or worse, discover you need to re-number because that network
that provided you the space called it back to give to a bigger customer or
won't let you announce it on other networks they specify where your cost
for bandwidth would be lower.

So, there are many reasons to obtain clean independent space - but most
are related to future expansion abilities and future flexibility.

"There is a market somewhere for just about anything."

Hope this info helps,

Thank You
Bob Evans

> Yes, exactly right.  You would probably have to tunnel the /27 back to
> where the >/24 lives.  That's the only way I can see of it working
> "anywhere".  That's a technically valid solution but maybe not so hot if
> you are looking for high redundancy/availability since you are dependent
> on the tunnel being up and working.
> As always the reputation of the aggregate is going to be critical as to
> how well this works for you.  It seems to me that increasingly these
> "portable" blocks have murky histories as spam and malware sources.  I
> would rather have a block assigned by a reputable upstream provider than
> to do this.
> Steven Naslund
> Chicago IL
>> Le 2018-01-04 20:16, Job Snijders a écrit :
>>> On Thu, 4 Jan 2018 at 20:13, Filip Hruska <> wrote:
>>>> I have stumbled upon this site [1] which seems to offer /27 IPv4
>>>> leasing.
>>>> They also claim "All of our IPv4 address space can be used on any
>>>> network in any location."
>>>> I thought that the smallest prefix size one could get routed
>>>> globally is /24?
>>> Yes
>>> So how does this work?
>>> Probably with GRE, IPIP or OpenVPN tunnels.
>>> Kind regards,
>>> Job
>> IPv4 /24 is commonly the minimal chunk advertised to (and accepted by)
>> neighbors. If I run a global (or regional) network, I may advertise this
>> /24 -- or rather an aggregate covering it -- over my diverse
>> interconnection with neighbors, your /27 being part of the chunk and
>> routed to you internally (if you're va customer)-- no need for
>> encapsulation efforts. Similar scenario may be multi-upstream, subject
>> to acceptance of "punching holes in aggregates"... Am I missing
>> something? What's the trigger for doing tunneling here?
>> Happy New Year '18, by the way !
>> mh

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