Since you're doing the work, you should do it the way that seems best to
you.

:)

The linkage will be hard to get working well, but if it does work well
it will be a thing of beauty.

I don't think it will be hard, but we'll see.

My experience with off the shelf servos is they won't re-point with single
degree accuracy but i haven't tried the more expensive digital servos.

Remember, our linkage ratio is not 1:1. The servo travels (180,,) degrees. The fin requires (,36,50) degrees. That's how we get our torque AND our accuracy.

Every servo i've ever taken apart had a sub-50 cent potentiometer in it.
Will that A) work. B) work under vibration, C) work reliably, D) work to
sub-degree precision? Honestly i think the answers are: Sometimes. No,
no, & no.

I think you were working with crap $12 servos. I'll bring some real servos for you to inspect. Do you think this guy could do this with an unreliable vibration-prone servo?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AqZ-mCd0HhM


Clearly doing anything but buying and using an off the shelf servo is
way more work than desirable. I'd like someone to prove me wrong and
show that off the shelf servos are just fine. Please.

I'll try. I've been putting RC servos in cars, planes, boats, and helicopters since I was a young child (counting... wow, has it really been over 25 years?). I'm certain they will work fine as long as we can determine the requirements and choose the servo.

I did notice these guys, who are interesting

   http://www.openservo.com/

That's interesting. I doubt they get better performance than Futaba, but it's neat that they have position FB. I2C still sucks...



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