I, too, am in the market for a new tape drive. Here's what I've found:

Exabyte M2: 60GB,  12MB/s, $3777 ($80 media)
Sony AIT-2: 50GB,   6MB/s, $3289 ($94 media)
DLT 8000  : 40GB,   6MB/s, $3915 ($64 media)
Sony AIT-1: 35GB,   3MB/s, $1913 ($88 media)
VXA-1     : 33GB,   3MB/s,  $939 ($67 media)
DDS-4     : 20GB,   3MB/s, $1072 ($33 media)
Mammoth   : 20GB,   3MB/s, $2126 ($56 media)
DLT 4000  : 20GB, 1.5MB/s, $1352 ($64 media)
Mammoth-LT: 14GB,   2MB/s, $1193 ($35 media)
DDS-3     : 12GB,   1MB/s,  $777 ($16 media)
Eliant 820:  7GB,   1MB/s, $1160 ( $8 media)
DDS-2     :  4GB, .51MB/s,  $606 ( $7 media)

-Native capacity listed, compressed capacity is typically 50% more
-Sustained transfer rate listed
-Cost is based on internal model with wide SCSI connector (if available)
-VXA-1 tape drive is even cheaper through Ecrix July promo ($539)
-Media listed is highest capacity format in single packs


So, the fastest, highest capacity tape drive is the Exabyte 
Mammoth-2. Unfortunately, it's one of the most expensive as well.

My understanding is that DLT drives aren't well geared for the 
repetitive start-stop-start pattern of incremental backups done by 
Retrospect. DLT drives tend to overshoot the tape and thus spend a 
lot of their time rewinding. This drive is best suited for backing up 
a large continuous flow of data. Sound right?

I've used AIT's in the past and I've been very happy with them. A few 
broken tapes but it wasn't too difficult to disassemble the Seagate 
autoloader and remove the tape.

VXA-1 seems like the deal. Good capacity, fast performance, 
super-duper reliability, fantastic price. Unfortunately, it received 
the worst performance scores by PC Mag 
<http://www.zdnet.com/pcmag/stories/reviews/0,6755,2455855,00.html>. 
But, that test was against only the higher performance versions of 
the other tapes drives (M2, DDS-4, DLT 8000, and AIT-2).

DDS (aka DAT) is definitely the most popular, price is good, media's 
cheap. But, everyone I know with DDS drives has had perpetual 
reliability problems (both media and mechanism). Someone said that 
this had to do with the thinner tapes found in the DDS-2 drives and 
that the problem had gone away with the DDS-3 drives. Anyone verify 
this?

So, which is the winner? For me, I'm torn between the VXA-1 and 
AIT-1. The PC Mag article made the VXA-1 look pretty bad but I'm 
thinking that it's just relative and that the performance numbers for 
the AIT-1 would be pretty similar. Plus the July Ecrix promo making 
the VXA 70% cheaper than the AIT forces me to try out the VXA. Even 
better, I can buy two VXA drives for less than the cost of one AIT 
drive and make a poor man's autoloader!


One last alternative, a friend of mine decided to skip the whole tape 
drive thing and buy a Quantum Snap Server 4000 ($2,469) instead. The 
Snap Servers ship with DataKeeper. Anyone have any experience with 
this? It only works under Windows but it allows "real-time" 
continuous back-up. On the Snap Server 4000, you get up to 120GB of 
storage.

The obvious drawbacks are:
-finite storage tops out at 120GB (or 90GB with RAID 5 enabled)
-no off-site backup
-no complete images of hard drives
-no historical backup

The advantages are:
-allows users to recover files without admin assistance
-high performance (hard drive vs. tape)
-real-time backup
-no backup server to maintain or purchase.


At 1:34 PM -0500 7/24/00, Robert Cooper wrote:
>Hello List,
>
>I am looking into DLT vs DDS for a tape library.  I went and read the old
>posts on the Ecrix and Mammoth DLT drives.  I was wondering what the user
>experience has been with them now, since it has been some months since these
>posts were put up.


--
----------------------------------------------------------
To subscribe:    [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To unsubscribe:  [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Archives:        <http://list.working-dogs.com/lists/retro-talk/>
Problems?:       [EMAIL PROTECTED]

Reply via email to