[cayugabirds-l] Sapsucker Woods Acoustic Monitoring Project

2017-03-31 Thread Christopher Wood
Good afternoon everyone,

The Bioacoustics Research Program and Information Science team at the Cornell 
Lab of Ornithology are collaborating on an initiative that we are calling the 
Sapsucker Woods Acoustic Monitoring Project (SWAMP) to understand the 
complimentary roles of acoustic monitoring and eBirding to develop novel ways 
of understanding bird distribution and abundance.

We need your help. Many of you are already eBirding around Sapsucker Woods – in 
the last three days alone there have been more than 100 checklists submitted 
from various sites around Sapsucker Woods. All eBirding around Sapsucker Woods 
this spring will help with this research. We ask that you also consider 
stationary counts at the 10 sites around Sapsucker Woods. You will find these 
sites on eBird and linked to in the map below, which are called Sapsucker Woods 
Avi1, Sapsucker Woods Avi2 . . . through Sapsucker Woods Avi10.

All you need to do is visit these locations referenced in the map below, submit 
at least one short stationary checklist, and join in the fun. Each checklist 
you submit, earns you one more chance to win prizes, fame, and glory. The 
project starts tomorrow, 1 April 2017. We’ll be collecting this information 
until at least 1 July 2017.

This page has all the information you need:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/avicaching/swamp/

Here are some additional details.

About the Science
The Cornell Lab deployed 30 in-house developed acoustic recorders (called 
SWIFT) which are configured to continuously monitor the soundscape in the 
Sapsucker Woods Sanctuary. Each of the units records acoustic data at 48 kHz 
sampling rate covering the frequency of all bird calls occurring in SWS. 
Scientific objectives we hope to address through this study are briefly 
outlined below:

  *   Ecology of vocalizations.  The sensor array at Sapsucker Woods will allow 
us to get a better handle on variation in behavior/activity/song rates as a 
function of a variety of factors such as the time of day, Julian Date, and 
weather. Comparing these with eBird submissions will also allow us to 
understand how these influence detection rates using two types of methods 
(acoustic, and eBird).
  *   Bird Habitat usage. The collected acoustic data will be used to model 
heterogeneity in detectability of different bird species in SWS with high 
temporal and spatial resolution.
  *   Noise impact assessment. The collected data will allow us to assess how 
noise originating from Highway 13 traffic and the airport (aircraft operations 
including engine ignition, takeoff and landing) propagates throughout the 
sanctuary. We furthermore want to study how the propagation of sound varies 
with environmental conditions (weather, vegetation etc.), and if the 
anthropogenic noise impacts the vocal behavior of birds in the SWS.
  *   Acoustic biodiversity study. The Cornell Lab is currently working with 
several national and international partners on the development of new acoustic 
analysis techniques to extract biodiversity and ecosystem health information 
from acoustic data. Visual bird surveys with avicaching and general eBird 
submissions for the SWS will be crucial to groundtruth our results. The dense 
array of recorders, the extended recording period, and many checklist 
submissions from eBird will provide us with the best possible data set to 
tackle this research project!
  *   Automated Sound ID. The data will also be used within the scope of a new 
Cornell Lab project, BirdVox, which aims to develop advanced methods for the 
detection and classification of bird vocalizations.

Where do I go?
Check out the locations here. If you want 
to load a map on your phone for easier navigation, here’s the Google Map 
link.
 And, of course, these locations are also visible in eBird mobile on iOS and 
Android when you submit checklists.

Scoring
You will earn one point each time you visit an SWAMP avicache and submit a 
complete, stationary checklist of 5-60 minutes duration.

Prizes and Rankings
Each point enters your name once into a random drawing for a prize. For 
example, if you submit 10 qualifying checklists, you have 10 points, and ten 
chances to win. If you have 100 checklists, that’s  100 points = 100 times. 
There will be two winners drawn from participants; each of the prize winners 
will have the choice of a free eBird t-shirt or ballcap and there will be a 
special surprise thrown in as well.
There is also a ranking for the most species seen in Avicache locations: a Top 
100 for the cumulative Avicache list. The eBirder who reports the highest 
species list from all Avicaches cumulatively through the end the Avicaching 
period will win in the species category. As of right now there is no prize for 
this category aside from the glory of seeing the most species. Of course, the 
real prize 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] hybrid teal, Montezuma; lake birds

2015-11-07 Thread Christopher Wood
As Jay mentioned, I  (finally!) had a chance to go and see the hybrid 
Blue-winged x Cinnamon Teal today. There was terrific selection of ducks and 
the light was beautiful. The impoundment by the Visitor Center also had a nice 
selection of shorebirds including Long-billed Dowitchers, Dunlin, Lesser 
Yellowlegs and a single Pectoral Sandpiper. Complete list with some comments on 
the teal here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S25734295

I should note that one of the the Eurasian Wigeon that we saw was a FEMALE. 
This is the first female I’ve seen in upstate New York, despite quite a bit of 
looking.

Cheers,
Chris



From: 
>
 on behalf of Jay McGowan
Reply-To: Jay McGowan
Date: Saturday, November 7, 2015 at 4:45 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] hybrid teal, Montezuma; lake birds

Hi all,
I finally got back up to Montezuma to look at the continuing teal yesterday. 
Better views revealed, as Dave posted, that the bird does indeed have distinct 
black speckling on the breast and side feathers, quashing any lingering doubts 
I might have had that it is anything but a hybrid BLUE-WINGED x CINNAMON TEAL. 
Please, if you submitted this bird to eBird, I encourage you to change your 
sightings to Blue-winged x Cinnamon Teal (hybrid) so I can validate the 
sightings. This is a disappointing outcome for many of us excited about keeping 
track of lists, but it is indeed still a very rare bird, so I will happily add 
it to my list of duck hybrids for the year (8+ combinations) instead.

Better teal photos here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S25724973
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S25725335

Otherwise, a male EURASIAN WIGEON was the only other duck of note in the area. 
Puddlers was full of geese, including over 100 Snow Geese, but as always was 
unpleasantly difficult to get to with the continuing deterioration of Towpath 
Road. Dunlin, Long-billed Dowitchers, and a Pectoral Sandpiper continue at the 
Visitor Center.

Chris Wood reports that the teal is still present today, along with two male 
Eurasian Wigeon.

I spent the morning today scoping Cayuga Lake from Long Point State Park and 
various points in Aurora. Loons were out in force, with a count of 1345 from 
the bluffs at the north end of lake road and many more in both directions. 
Despite these concentrations, I was unable to find any different loons, even a 
Red-throated, among them. Gull numbers were also good, with many hundreds of 
Herring Gulls forming dense feeding frenzies out on the lake, especially off 
the Mackenzie-Childs bluffs. Up to eight Bonaparte's Gulls joined these flocks, 
as well as a single 1st-cycle Lesser Black-backed. Otherwise, a Red-necked 
Grebe off Long Point and a White-winged Scoter off the Lake Road bluffs were 
about the only different species I was able to turn up. Lake Ontario yielded 
Sabine's Gull, jaegers, and more today, so I had high hopes for something on 
our lake, but no luck.

--
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jw...@cornell.edu
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Re: [nysbirds-l] Cinnamon Teal - yes, Montezuma

2015-11-04 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi everyone,

I thought I’d chime in with a few reasons why this teal is a hybrid. I have 
only seen photos of this bird, but do spend a fair amount of time looking at 
ducks particularly in transitional plumage. There are several features that 
simply aren’t ever shown by Cinnamon Teal and are diagnostic for a hybrid. I 
expect someone who has seen the bird and looked carefully at transitional 
Cinnamon Teal will also be able to chime in with more reasons, but here are a 
few of the more easily seen features. Tim Lenz’s eBird checklist has some 
diagnostic photos, and I think Tim first identified this as a hybrid.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S25670501



1. The amount of white (or pale coloration) where the flanks meet the rump 
isn’t shown by any plumage of Cinnamon Teal.  I have not seen a “Cinnamon Teal” 
with the white here (recalling Blue-winged Teal) that wasn't a hybrid. In my 
experience, this is one of the best thing to look for when scanning through 
flocks of Cinnamon Teal when you are trying to find a hybrid.

2. Spotting on sides. There isn't a transitional plumage of Cinnamon Teal that 
shows spotting on the sides consistent with this bird. Eclipse Cinnamon Teal 
have bars or other intricate markings, but not spots. Several images of this 
bird, show well defined spots that are typical of hybrids (and a dominant 
Blue-winged Teal trait).

3. The cinnamon coloration on feathers that have been replaced is diluted and 
not as bright as you would see on a pure bird. One can get an overall 
impression that ducks become brighter during fall as the birds attain basic 
(=pretty/"breeding") plumage, but this is because of the replacement of 
retained alternate feathers with new fresh basic feathers. Feathers don’t come 
in and gradually brighten as the season progresses, though. If you look 
carefully at individual feathers, you can see they aren’t as bright as on a 
pure Cinnamon Teal.

4. There is a hint of a facial crescent that is already apparent, even though 
many of the very small feathers on the head is still being replaced. This will 
vary considerably with angle and light, but is another indication the bird is a 
hybrid. This trait is variable with some hybrids showing very distinctive bold 
white crescents and others showing very limited white patch even when a bird is 
fully in basic plumage. For instance: 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/r101/13514399314

Anyway, a great find and wonderful bird. Montezuma is certainly a great place 
for hybrid waterfowl.

Chris Wood
Ithaca, NY





On 11/4/15, 8:59 AM, "bounce-119856844-10572...@list.cornell.edu on behalf of 
rfr...@earthlink.net"  wrote:

>The CITE is present this morning (8:30am) in LaRue's Lagoon along Wildlife 
>Drive in Montezuma NWR.Rich Fried  Rob Bate  New York City
>
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[cayugabirds-l] Hybrid Blue-winged x Cinnamon Teal

2015-11-02 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi everyone,

I think all the traits that Jay points out are conclusive that this is a 
hybrid. There isn't a transitional plumage of Cinnamon Teal that would ever 
show this extent of a white facial crescent, spotting on the sides or this 
amount of white where the flanks meet the rump. The cinnamon coloration is also 
diluted and not as bright. These traits are the ones to look for on Cinnamon x 
Blue-winged hybrid - a bird that is much rarer than Cinnamon Teal (though 
perhaps not in NY).

Great find!

Chris Wood
Ithaca, NY


On Nov 2, 2015, at 1:37 PM, Jay McGowan 
> wrote:

The CINNAMON TEAL found yesterday is still being reported up to a few minutes 
ago. Some doubts continue, however, as to its purity as a few characters, 
including a pale face, some white on the flank, and indeterminately patterned 
sides may point to it being a Blue-winged x Cinnamon hybrid, but its 
transitional plumage make it hard to be sure. Higher resolution photos than we 
were able to obtain yesterday afternoon would be helpful to resolve this, so 
please post if you obtain any! For the moment, be warned that this is a 
possibility. Either way, this is a beautiful bird and well worth the trouble of 
going to look at.

Also, I just noticed this report of a Glossy Ibis from October 16th. It must 
not have come through on the eBird rare bird alert because it was submitted 
more than a week after the sighting took place. This is very unfortunate 
because, although the images are somewhat poor, the overall coloration looks 
very good for a WHITE-FACED IBIS:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S25558704
This was obviously a while ago, but we should still keep an eye out for this 
bird in the refuge area.

--
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Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jw...@cornell.edu
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[cayugabirds-l] Dryden Lake and Avicaching sites: 7 April

2015-04-07 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi everyone,

While some may prefer sunny blue skies, days where skies blend into bark and 
mud offer much better birding. Shades of gray and heavy moisture in the air 
were too tempting to resist. Perhaps E. L. James is a birder? Whatever the 
case, Dryden Lake was calling.

While still almost entirely frozen, open patches on the east and west side of 
Dryden Lake hosted good numbers of birds including RED-NECKED GREBE, 
LONG-TAILED DUCK, and BONAPARTE'S GULLS. 61 species total.

I also did two avicaching sites, which were surprisingly good-it's interesting 
to see what is at these most underbirded locations in the county.

Links to all three checklists below.

Dryden Lake:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22734684

AviTom34:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22734948

AviTom 39:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S22735169


Good birding.

Chris Wood
Ithaca, NY

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[cayugabirds-l] Willet and Buff-breasted at K-m

2014-09-02 Thread Christopher Wood
A Willet just came in and landed at Knox-M. visible from East Road. There is 
also a Buff-breasted Sandpiper on the higher flats. Overcast skies make for 
fair viewing. 

Chris  Jessie
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Com Nighthawks over Sapsucker Woods

2014-08-19 Thread Christopher Wood
21 nighthawks just flew over Monkey Run!!

Holy!!!

CLW


On Tuesday, August 19, 2014, Kenneth V. Rosenberg k...@cornell.edu wrote:

  Three NIGHTHAWKS flew south over the Cornell Lab of Ornithology parking
 lots at about 6:20 PM — I see that others are reporting nighthawks this
 evening as well on eBird.

  KEN


  Kenneth V. Rosenberg
 Conservation Science Program
 Cornell Lab of Ornithology
 Office: 607-254-2412
 cell: 607-342-4594
 k...@cornell.edu javascript:_e(%7B%7D,'cvml','k...@cornell.edu');

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[cayugabirds-l] Black Terns at Stewart Park

2014-08-18 Thread Christopher Wood
There were 6 Black Terns at Stewart Park this morning. They were far to the
north, visible through a scope but not with binoculars.

Other highlights included a juvenile Black-crowned Night-Heron, 3 flyby
Semipalmated Sandpipers, and a Yellow-rumped Warbler. Complete list here:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S19503933

Chris Wood

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Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Cerulean Warbler at Monkey Run

2014-08-17 Thread Christopher Wood
There is a Cerulean Warbler with a mixed flock of warblers at Monkey Run
SE. To look for it park along hwy 13 at fall creek. Walk on south side
heading west along trail to where you reach bluff overlooking creek (and is
at sunlit edge). Bird is foraging in this area. Female.

Cheers,
Chris Wood


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Owl seduction

2014-07-02 Thread Christopher Wood
John has great advice.  You want to avoid metal, which will heat up and
potentially kill or harm anything inside. Best practices would also be to
avoid painting, staining or treating the wood with preservatives or
creosote. Milk cartons are also best avoided. NestWatch has a lot of useful
information on providing nest boxes and monitoring nests. Below is a direct
link to the nest box plans, but you may want to explore other parts of the
site too.

http://nestwatch.org/learn/nest-box-resource-center/nest-box-construction-plans/

Best,
Chris

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu


On Mon, Jun 30, 2014 at 10:31 AM, John Confer con...@ithaca.edu wrote:

  HI Folks,

 I have no information about using metal boxes as potential nest
 boxes.  Owls probably can't be too picky about the shape of their nest box
 because natural cavities come in a variety of shapes. But I do have a
 concern. I wonder if metal boxes wouldn't get too hot if they get direct
 sun. I wonder if they would lack insulation and get too cold when the
 temperature drops. I don't think owls carry much nesting material, if any
 at al, and sitting on a piece of metal could be really near lethal in cold
 weather and really hard on eggs. Maybe you could line the box with plywood?

  Anyone else have nesting experiences for birds in metal containers?

 I put up one of Brad Prentise's owl boxes and had an owl use it for a
 winter roost, once in about 15 years. I know other's have had an occasional
 owl and Hooded Merganser use Brad's boxes. It is fun to put them up and
 hope.

 Good luck,

 John Confer

 I think this is entirely appropriate for the list serve.




 On 6/29/2014 5:57 PM, Robin Cisne wrote:

  I hope you'll excuse this being somewhat off-topic, but I could use some
 sage counsel.  I have an old mailbox that I was thinking I could nail up in
 a tree in hopes an owl would roost in it.  Am I deluding myself?  If this
 is a realistic possibility, are there things I could do to make it more
 attractive?  I put up a bat house a couple of years ago and am disappointed
 that it remains unused.
  Thanks for your help,
  Robin



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[cayugabirds-l] Eurasian Green-winged Teal

2014-03-22 Thread Christopher Wood
At East Shore park now.

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[cayugabirds-l] Goose flight

2014-03-14 Thread Christopher Wood
I have seen several flocks of Snow Geese and a few Canadas heading north
this morning -- I only scanned for about 5 minutes. I'm sure someone more
enterprising would do quite well today.

Also several flocks of grackles.

Chris Wood

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Jay McGowan: male TUFTED DUCK at E Shore Pk

2014-02-15 Thread Christopher Wood
Here is a link to a checklist that Jessie and I entered into eBird, which
includes photos of the Tufted Duck and the Canvasback x Redhead. The latter
resembles a Common Pochard but has more extensive black on the bill and
slightly different bill and head shape.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S16953987

Good GBBCing,
CLW and JHB

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu


On Sat, Feb 15, 2014 at 1:14 PM, Jay McGowan jw...@cornell.edu wrote:

 The bird was out with the distant scaup flock. All the birds shifted north
 around 1230 and we have not been able to find it since. Still lots of
 Aythya at East Shore, so it may appear again or it may be in a sub flock up
 to the north. Chris Wood also had a Redhead x Canvasback in the group.
 On Feb 15, 2014 12:12 PM, Dave Nutter nutter.d...@me.com wrote:

 just reported on RBA a few minutes ago

 --Dave Nutter

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Ebird

2013-11-26 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi Diana,

I haven't had these problems and haven't seen mention elsewhere of them,
but let's see if we can figure out what is happening. Let's continue the
discussion off list.

Can you let me know what browser and operating system you are using? Also,
if you could send me a screenshot including the URL of what the crash looks
like, that would be great.

Thanks,
Chris



Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu


On Mon, Nov 25, 2013 at 6:54 PM, Diana whiti...@roadrunner.com wrote:

  Hi,
  Ebird is crashing when I get to choosing a location on a map using county
 and state. Anyone else having this problem?
 Diana Whiting

 Diana Whiting
 dianawhitingphotography.com
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[cayugabirds-l] Tompkins County, east of Ithaca 3 Golden Eagles

2013-11-23 Thread Christopher Wood
I spent the morning checking a few areas east of Ithaca, mostly near Dryden
Lake and Fall Creek. Links to checklists below with photos.

*Dryden Lake*
Golden Eagle, 7 Gadwall
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S15738645

*Hile School Road Wetland*
Fairly quiet, American Tree Sparrows
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S15738933

*Genung *
Fox Sparrow
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S15739108

*Freeville Marshes*
Field Sparrow among a nice assortment of sparrows
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S15739771

*Caswell Road Grasslands*
2 Golden Eagles, Rough-legged Hawk, 10 Rusty Blackbirds
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S15740067

Cheers,
Chris

Chris Wood

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma ibises

2013-11-19 Thread Christopher Wood
I think there have been at least two different White-faced Ibis at
Montezuma this fall. A 1st-year bird that was found on the 17th and was
seen daily through the 22nd. Starting the 23rd, I believe only the 1st-year
Glossy Ibis was seen until the 27th. On the 27th, The White-faced Ibis
appeared again -- the only problem is that this individual looks completely
different and appears to be a 2nd-year bird.

Here is a photo of the first bird (1st-year). Note the relatively uniform
appearance:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/68672476@N00/10392659105/in/photolist-gQn6tF-gQo4XR-gQnbEw-gQnc5a

The second individual, apparently a second-year bird, looks very different.
Note the contrast between the wing coverts and scapulars.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/seabamirum/10876310134/

I think Andy Guthrie was the first to bring this to our attention.

Thanks,
Chris


Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
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http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu


On Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 12:55 PM, Jay McGowan jw...@cornell.edu wrote:

 Thought some may be interested, after a period of absence and then with
 only the Glossy Ibis present, LaRue and Jackie report that both the Glossy
 and the White-faced ibis were in the Visitor Center pool this morning.


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 Macaulay Library
 Cornell Lab of Ornithology
 jw...@cornell.edu
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[cayugabirds-l] Audubons Warbler

2013-11-14 Thread Christopher Wood
There is an Audubons Warbler along the canal on the west side of the
Wegmans parking lot (Ithaca). 7:45 thursday 14 November.

Team Sapsucker
Cornell Lab


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[cayugabirds-l] Ithaca area birds (interesting gulll; Yellow Warbler)

2013-10-27 Thread Christopher Wood
I birded the Stevenson Road compost piles in Ithaca this morning, which
were quite good. There were two Lesser Black-backed Gulls, but the most
interesting bird was a gull that appeared intermediate between Ring-billed
and Herring Gull. I tried to turn into an odd American Herring Gull (which
it was more similar to in structure and size). There are a couple photos in
the eBird checklist below, so it may be useful to look at those when
reading the following notes. Compared to a Herring Gull, note the
relatively long-winged appearance, leg color similar to Ring-billed Gull,
small bill with well defined black ring (usually not shown by HERG quite
this advanced in adult-like upperparts coloration). Head pattern recalls
Ring-billed Gull but with HERG-like smudging on nape and particularly
underpart; also note the greater wing coverts have some brownish coloration
most similar to HERG. There was no overlap in size with any Herring Gull or
Ring-billed Gull there (intermediate in size; much larger than all RBGU but
slightly smaller than the smallest Herring Gulls). The images look more
RBGU like, but with brown on greater coverts, a bit more brown smudging on
breast than is typical, and fairly large black spot on tertial.

I am not aware of any records of Herring x Ring-billed Gulls. Andy Guthrie
sent this image of Ring-billed x Lesser Black-backed from Spain, which, as
he notes, looks similar to this bird but differs in how one would expect
Ring-billed x Herring versus Ring-billed x Lesser Black-backed would
appear. Anyway, interesting bird.

Complete checklist and photos here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S15501748

After finishing up shopping at Wegmans I thought that the canal on the west
side looked as if it may harbor some sparrows or lingering birds. Walking
south into the land of big box stores revealed a YELLOW WARBLER. It has a
bad wing, so perhaps it will be around until it gets harder to find food.

Complete checklist and photos here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S15502776

Chris Wood

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[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma ibis present

2013-10-20 Thread Christopher Wood
The White-faced and Glossy Ibis are present in the usual location--really
an excellent opportunity to study differences between the two birds: eye
color, facial skin, size, overall coloration, differences in wing coverts
etc.

Cheers,
Chris


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[cayugabirds-l] Ibis video and photos

2013-10-20 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi everyone,

It's not very often that one has the chance to view White-faced and Glossy
Ibis side-by-side at very close proximity -- particularly in Upstate New
York.
I thought some people may enjoy some side-by-side video.

https://vimeo.com/77369914

The face pattern and eye color is certainly striking, but one can see a
wide range of differences between these two birds. I was struck by the
differences in color pattern to the wing coverts, which stood out strongly
when the birds are side-by-side but I expect may also be helpful on lone
birds. It was interesting to see how these colors changed, when the sun was
obscured by a cloud or the birds changed angles.  Perhaps the best single
image I have to compare these when the birds are a the same angle to the
light is here (also helpful because the heads are distracting us).
http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinicola/10392852153/

There are a few other still images up as well.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinicola/

It was great see so many people watching, studying, taking photos of two
great birds at Montezuma that were close enough for everyone to see and
enjoy.

Best wishes,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Bluegrass Lane

2013-10-15 Thread Christopher Wood
Tim Lenz, Jessie Barry and I went there about 12:30. We found the Blue
Grosbeak in the previously reported area, flushing from the edge of the
cornfield -- it spent the great majority of time hidden in the corn,
calling a bit. We only stayed about 10 minutes. We did not see any herons
or bitterns, but did see a Wilson's Snipe -- not suggesting that is what
you saw (!!) just another nice bird in a cool spot.

Cheers,
Chris

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu


On Tue, Oct 15, 2013 at 1:08 PM, Rebecca Hansen rpxena...@hotmail.comwrote:

 I went to look for the Blue Grosbeak where it has been reported. I did not
 find it but a large bird flushed from near the edge of the cornfield which
 looked to me like an American Bittern.  It flew about 20 feet and dove back
 in.  If anyone else sees it I would love to know if that is what it is.
 There was also a Northern Harrier cruising by.

 Becky Hansen

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[cayugabirds-l] SPECIAL Tuesday Night Seminar

2013-05-28 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi everyone,

I wanted to post a reminder about this special Tuesday Night Seminar with Mark 
Avery this evening at 7:30 at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. It's sure to be 
thought-provoking and provide some interesting perspectives from Mark's 
experience at RSPB.

Please join us for the final Monday Night Seminar of the semester on TUESDAY, 
May 28th, at 7:30pm in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's Visitor Center 
auditorium.

Dr. Mark Avery presents:

How to Do Bird Conservation the UK Way: The role of science

Mark Avery is the former Conservation Director for the Royal Society fro the 
Protection of Birds (RSPB) and wildlife blogger for the The Independent 
newspaper. Mark Avery spent 25 years working for the Royal Society for the 
Protection of Birds (RSPB) in the UK–an organization with more than 1.1 million 
paying members. As Conservation Director for more than a decade, he led 
conservation actions: lobbying the UK government; carrying out species 
reintroductions; providing outreach to farmers; buying land for nature 
reserves. Dr. Avery will discuss how much of this success came down to science 
and how much to luck or politics.

Mark's charismatic personality and insightful perspective on bird conservation 
from across the pond, ensures this will be an exciting finish to the Spring 
semester seminar series.

The seminar is free and open to the public. Doors open at 7:00 and will close 
when the auditorium reaches capacity. For more information visit: 
www.birds.cornell.edu/mns

Cheers,
Chris
Christopher Wood
eBird Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
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[cayugabirds-l] Myers

2013-05-16 Thread Christopher Wood
A few nice birds at Myers now including Short-billed Dowitcher on point, 
breeding plumage Red-necked Grebes and Cliff Swallow. 

Chris Wood

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[cayugabirds-l] Renwick versus Fuertes

2013-05-13 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi everyone,

I know this issue has been discussed many times before and I know that opinions 
are divided. For every email I get that says we should call the woods Renwick, 
I get three that say we should call it Fuertes. The official website of Ithaca 
calls the 55 acres south of Stewart Park the Fuertes Bird Sanctuary. It 
describes this both in text and on the map. Given the huge contributions that 
Fuertes made, we (eBird) are happy to follow the official City of Ithaca 
website and go with calling the 55 acres the Fuertes Sanctuary.

http://www.ci.ithaca.ny.us/parks/stewartpark.cfm


Christopher Wood
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Cornell Lab of Ornithology
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[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma (TRICOLORED HERON) and Owasco Lake - 5/5

2013-05-05 Thread Christopher Wood
Tom Johnson and I spent the morning birding a few areas in the Finger Lakes. 
Here's a quick summary of our birding along with links to eBird checklists, 
many of which have photos, more comments , and links to a map of the location.

We started birding at Island Park on the north end of Owasco Lake, which had 3 
Red-breasted Mergansers and 10 Snow Geese. The mergansers were all on the water 
when we arrived and then flew up, circled and flew off to the west.
eBird Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13994840

We spent the rest morning birding northern portions of the Montezuma Wetland 
Complex.

Carncross Road was highlighted by 2 Trumpeter Swans, a family of Sandhill 
Cranes including a recently hatched bird, and a fabulous female Wilson's 
Phalarope. Perhaps the biggest surprise here was the large number of Lapland 
Longspurs, including several males that flew overhead several times, often with 
American Pipits. In a quick check of eBird this evening, we only saw one other 
May record in New York (Willie D'Anna, Niagara County 11 May 2012).
eBird Checklist: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13995564

We headed over to Howland Island where highlights included a extremely 
cooperative Cerulean Warbler (photos) and a Vesper Sparrow singing from north 
of the parking lot at the end of Carncross Road.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13995548

From there we headed to Van Dyne Spoor and the Sandhill Crane Unit of 
Montezuma. We arrived to find Jay McGowan and Livia Santana had just found a 
TRICOLORED HERON that flew over them, landed, but was hidden in the marsh. 
Luckily, over the next 110 minutes we were there the bird flew up out of the 
marsh several times and we enjoyed prolonged and excellent views of it in 
flight. Shortly after joining Jay and Livia, two Glossy Ibis flew directly 
overhead and straight away, never to be seen again (at least by us). There 
were also good numbers of Black-crowned Night-Herons, Green Herons, Great Blue 
Herons and at least one American Bittern, and nesting Trumpeter Swans. We also 
had several flyover Lapland Longspurs here. Just before leaving we had 
prolonged views of a mink.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13997039

Towpath Rd./ Knox-Marcellus Marsh was fairly uneventful.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S14001609

Christopher Wood
eBird Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
http://ebird.org
http://birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Hawthorn Orchard Park Preserve

2013-05-02 Thread Christopher Wood
We spent about an hour migration watching from between the Hawthorn Orchard and 
tennis courts on the east side this morning and had a few birds. Highlights 
included Eastern Kingbird, Rose-breasted Grosbeak and some nice patch birds 
like Purple Martin, Chimney Swift, Red-brested Nuthatch and Pine Siskins. A 
complete list is here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13962187

Grant and I also went to the Park Preserve earlier in the day. Highlights 
included NINE species of warblers including Magnolia, Prairie, Black-throated 
Blue, Nashville, Black-and-white and parula. A complete list is here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13961726

Cheers,
Chris

Christopher Wood
eBird Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
http://ebird.org
http://birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Black Scoter and Dunlin

2013-05-01 Thread Christopher Wood
This morning I made fairly quick stops at Myers Point and Stewart Park.

Highlights at Myers included a Dunlin, Lesser Yellowlegs, Least Sandpiper, 
Green Heron, Nashville Warbler, Palm Warbler and a flock of Bonaparte's Gulls 
heading north. The full checklist is here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13950627

Stewart Park was a bit quieter, but I did see a distant Black Scoter far to the 
north. This is only the second time that I have seen Black Scoter in the county 
in spring (the other was 25 May 2006 at Myers Point with Tim Lenz).

Here is the full checklist from Stewart Park and Fuertes Bird Sanctuary:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13951110

Christopher Wood
eBird Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
http://ebird.org
http://birds.cornell.edu

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Question about lower lake road

2013-03-11 Thread Christopher Wood
There are also different factors at play with different species and
different individuals of the same species. Some, like Northern Pintail,
American Black Duck, Mallard were waiting to be able to forage in fields
(say at the Mucklands). So they tend to concentrate at the north end and
then make flights up to those fields to see if there are areas to forage.
Tundra Swans and Snow Geese do similar things (forage in muck). Snow Geese
are shot at right now, so they stay out more toward the middle of the
lake. 

Aythya (Redhead, scaup) dive for food. As the lake opens in the spring,
they follow the ice edge as it reveals foraging areas that were impossible
to reach earlier in the year. So you have optimal staging for daily
movements in some species, optimal foraging for others, migration staging
for others compounded with the advantages of flocking for predator
avoidance. All this leads to some very large concentrations with
exceptional diversity at the north end of the lake in spring --
concentrations and levels of diversity that you never see at the south end
at any season. 

Christopher Wood

eBird Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
http://ebird.org
http://birds.cornell.edu




On 3/11/13 10:38 AM, Donna Scott d...@cornell.edu wrote:

Interestingly, I live by the deepest part of the Lake, 430 feet deep, and
I rarely get big concentrations of Snow geese or swans here.
Now and then big rafts of diving ducks will go by or stay near the
shallow edges for a while, but I almost never get all the big
concentrations of geese, swans or duck rafts one sees up north or down by
Ithaca. 
Donna Scott

Sent from my iPhone
Donna Scott

On Mar 11, 2013, at 10:31 AM, Geo Kloppel geoklop...@gmail.com wrote:

 Those two factors (shallow water, ice shelf) are related; ice forms
soonest and lingers longest over the shallows. Aquatic ecology (hence
exploitable food resources) are also influenced by depth. And of course
the north end of the lake is surrounded by marshes and agricultural
lands that offer forage whenever the snow cover does not prevent it.
 
 The winter draw-down of lake level makes the shallows even shallower,
almost like a tidal area.
 
 -Geo Kloppel
 
 On Mar 11, 2013, at 8:58 AM, John VanNiel vanni...@flcc.edu wrote:
 
 There was also an ice shelf there to loaf on...
 
 -Original Message-
 From: bounce-75479805-3493...@list.cornell.edu
[mailto:bounce-75479805-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Geo
Kloppel
 Sent: Monday, March 11, 2013 8:06 AM
 To: cayugabirds-l
 Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Question about lower lake road
 
 I imagine a number of factors contribute to the attractive power of
that area. Here's one: the lake is still broad there, but it's very
shallow, mostly 5 - 6 ft.
 
 -Geo 
 
 On Mar 11, 2013, at 1:29 AM, Barbara B. Eden b...@cornell.edu
wrote:
 
 I am curious why that is the place where the snow geese and tundra
swans congregate
 
 Thanks,
 Barbara
 
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[nysbirds-l] Hammond Hill State Forest migration watch

2013-03-10 Thread Christopher Wood
I spent three hours at Hammond Hill State Forest east of Ithaca this afternoon 
(starting at 12:10pm) watching migrants.  As others have noted, there was an 
amazing flight of waterfowl throughout Tompkins County and beyond. This flight 
was strongly dominated by Canada Geese. I was curious how much of a 
concentrating effect Cayuga Lake had for the geese Would there still be some 
out to the east or if were they headed toward Cayuga Lake. The numbers of geese 
were just as high at Hammond Hill as Jessie and I had seen from Monkey Run 
earlier in the day. In comparing numbers with Luke Seitz and others watching 
from Cornell campus, it seemed that we recorded very close to the same number 
of birds. While some of these birds may have been the same, the great majority 
were probably different suggesting a very broad front given others reported 
similar numbers in Trumansburg. It would be fun to organize several different 
stations in the Finger Lakes (and beyond) the next time we have such a flight 
on a weekend.

Jessie Barry and Jeff Gerbracht joined me for part of the time I was here and 
helped me find much more than I would have done on my own.

Highlights included 8 Golden Eagles, 1 PINE GROSBEAK, 1 Northern Shrike, 1 
White-winged Crossbill and at least 24 Evening Grosbeaks.

Waterfowl made up the bulk of the show: 297 Snow Goose, 26575 Canada Geese, 13 
Cackling Geese, 1 Tundra Swan, 1 Wood Duck, 2 Northern Pintail

A complete checklist with some photos can be found at the link below. I broke 
counts of Canadas into 20 minute segments for anyone interested (which may just 
be me!)

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S13354236


Good birding,
Chris

Christopher Wood
eBird Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
http://ebird.org
http://birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Eurasian Wigeon at Woofly's

2013-03-09 Thread Christopher Wood
This afternoon Luke, Jessie and I went up the west side of the Cayuga Lake and 
focused our efforts along Lower Lake Road on the NW side of the lake. There are 
tens of thousands of birds with huge numbers of Snow Geese. Most pintail are 
now in the mucklands and Mallard, Black Duck and Common Merganser numbers have 
gone down since last weekend. Still, the number of birds is spectacular. The 
rarest species we found was a male EURASIAN WIGEON that Jessie found mixed in 
with Redhead. We highly recommend eating at Woolfys and enjoying the view from 
the deck. The people who work there were very hospitable and the viewing in the 
afternoon is simply spectacular. 

To find Woolfys open google and type Woolfys Cayuga Lake.

Good Birding,
Chris, Jessie and Luke

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Snowy owl?

2013-03-03 Thread Christopher Wood
This sounds like it may be a Short-eared Owl. Snowy Owls do not have beige or 
brown on the wings. The markings are black. This seems to be a great year for 
Short-eared Owl and the habitat around King Road looks good for Short-eared. 
That would be my best guess.

Chris Wood

On Mar 1, 2013, at 12:42 PM, Linda Madeo 
lwma...@gmail.commailto:lwma...@gmail.com wrote:

I saw a bird that looked like this, too ... yesterday around 5:30 pm on W. King 
Rd.
Linda Madeo

On Thu, Feb 28, 2013 at 9:05 PM, Tobias Dean 
tdea...@twcny.rr.commailto:tdea...@twcny.rr.com wrote:
Second hand sighting: Wife Elizabeth said a very large owl, very white with
beige markings evenly spread on wings and back, flew right in front of her
at headlight level last night on E.King Rd. in Ithaca.
She didn't get a good look at the head.
this was well after dark.

   Toby Dean


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[cayugabirds-l] Tufted Duck, Hog Hole, Ithaca

2013-01-29 Thread Christopher Wood
I think many people have heard that Jeff Gerbracht and I saw a Tufted Duck at 
Hog Hole, Ithaca NY today. Here are my checklist notes from eBird along with a 
link to my eBird checklist that includes photos and more comments. You can 
click the Map link in eBird if you are not familiar with Hog Hole. Hopefully 
careful checking of the south end of the lake tomorrow will allow others to see 
the bird.

eBird Checklist comments:

After an extended eBird meeting that went well into lunch, Jeff Gerbracht and I 
decided to go down to Hog Hole to look for the Eared Grebe that Dave Nutter had 
seen earlier in the day. We debated whether to scan from the highway or to come 
to Hog Hole. Since CLW keeps a Hog Hole list, he was very interested in going 
to see the grebe from Hog Hole and Jeff was more than accommodating. We arrived 
and after a few minutes of scanning found the Eared Grebe close to shore. 
Little did we know at the time, but the real treat was yet to come! Being good 
eBirders, we wanted to do good counts of all the ducks. As Jeff was carefully 
counting Redheads, he came upon a very interesting duck and quickly showed me 
through the scope -- TUFTED DUCK! Aging/sexing is complicated, but clearly not 
an adult male. As of this point I believe it is likely a first-year female, but 
need to be a bit more work to figure out timing of eye color changes, extent of 
white by age and sex, and timing of molt. We managed to get some video and a 
few images before the rain started pouring down.

WEATHER: Overcast, initially with light drizzle becoming a heavy and soaking 
downpour. 37F. Calm.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S12764792

Best wishes,
Chris

Christopher Wood
eBird Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
http://ebird.org
http://birds.cornell.edu

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Tufted Duck, crappy tripod

2013-01-29 Thread Christopher Wood
That tripod works just fine! Well enough to find a female Tufted Duck!  If we 
gave him a real tripod, I'd never be able to find any birds before him!

Christopher Wood
eBird Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
http://ebird.org
http://birds.cornell.edu

From: Jeff Gerbracht ja...@cornell.edumailto:ja...@cornell.edu
Reply-To: Jeff Gerbracht 
jeff.gerbra...@cornell.edumailto:jeff.gerbra...@cornell.edu
Date: Tuesday, January 29, 2013 8:02 PM
To: Upstate Birding 
cayugabird...@list.cornell.edumailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Tufted Duck, crappy tripod

Aww, come on.   It doesn't have any odor about it at all!!   And I did give you 
fair warning ;) You have to talk nicely to it and kick out it's legs once 
in awhile.
   Glad you saw the bird
  Jeff

On Tue, Jan 29, 2013 at 7:37 PM, Kevin J. McGowan 
k...@cornell.edumailto:k...@cornell.edu wrote:
Just wanted to say that despite the awful piece of equipment Jeff lent me, I 
was able to balance my scope on it in an adequate way that allowed me to have 
decent views of the EARED GREBE at Hogs Hole. After the thing dumped my 
spotting scope eyepiece-first into the mud first.  Still, a bad and infuriating 
tripod is better than none, and I am very much grateful and indebted to Jeff 
for having lent it to me.

Tufted Duck is such a great Basin bird that I suggest those of us who have seen 
it donate our quarters and half-a-dollars toward buying Jeff Gehrbracht a 
decent tripod in thanks. (Seriously, his stinks!)

Kevin
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[cayugabirds-l] Northern Pintail

2013-01-27 Thread Christopher Wood
At Cornell Lab pond right now with Mallards. 

Andy Guthrie and Chris Wood. 

Chris Wood


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[cayugabirds-l] Short-eared Owl

2013-01-26 Thread Christopher Wood
Flying around north end of Schofield rd. (Lansing). Came out at 5:38pm. 

Chris Wood


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] 100+ Redpolls-for a minute

2013-01-09 Thread Christopher Wood
I also think that many of these redpolls are still actively moving.
These birds may have come in, fed briefly and then taken off for some
place a hundred miles away. While we often think of migration being in
May and September, there probably isn't a single month of the year
where at least some individuals of a few species are moving. I've
certainly noticed actively migrating redpolls in the last week or so.
I've seen flocks of redpolls still moving south along the North Shore
of Lake Superior in February, while other species were moving north.

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu


On Wed, Jan 9, 2013 at 9:52 AM, Geo Kloppel geoklop...@gmail.com wrote:
 Hi Laura,

 When gathered in large flocks they actually strike me as being _more_
 skittish; perhaps it's a compounding effect. Makes sense in a way. There may
 be no predator around at the moment,  but they know that by concentrating at
 a rich food source in a landscape of scarcity they create a magnet for any
 predators in the area.

 -Geo

 On Jan 9, 2013, at 9:14 AM, Laura Stenzler l...@cornell.edu wrote:

 Hi,
 This morning there was a flock of at least 100 Redpolls in the trees near
 our feeders. A few were at the feeders, but after sticking around for a few
 minutes they alldisappeared.  Here’s a question – why would they leave a
 rich food source?  Our feeders are full, there are 7 to choose from, and
 they clearly are happy when they decide to land. I’ve seen this happen
 before, when there is no obvious evidence (to me) of predators in the area.
 Other birds keep happily visiting the feeders – chickadees, woodpeckers,
 nuthatches, etc.  There are other feeders at neighbors’ houses, close by.

 Any thoughts?
 L

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[cayugabirds-l] Screech-Owls

2013-01-08 Thread Christopher Wood
It may be a good evening to listen for screech-owls. Jeff Gerbracht
mentioned his was calling. We have one vocalizing spontaneously here at
Monkey Run too.

Cheers,
Chris


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[cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Basin Highlights of 2012

2013-01-07 Thread Christopher Wood
When I lived in Colorado, at the end of each year we'd post some of our
favorite birds of the year. It was fun and gave a nice opportunity to think
back on the last year.I finally had a chance to look through some of the
birds I saw in 2012 and realized what an amazing year it was. I thought it
may be fun for some of us to share highlights from the past year. Hopefully
others will be able to post some of highlights as well.

I first met Tim Lenz on Adak, Alaska and he spent much of the time
explaining to me that the Cayuga Lake Basin offered some of the best
birding in the country. I was skeptical. A landlocked part of Upstate New
York? Could it really be exciting? Even a casual look at 2012 makes me
realize something I already know -- Tim Lenz is usually right.

I decided to limit this to the Cayuga Lake Basin, which forced me to cut
some great birds like Townsend's Solitaire, and some further afield like
Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch! And it also doesn't do justice to the many great
experiences, great birders, and great migration events we had.

My Top 10 for 2012.

Honorable mentions (in any other year these would be the top 10)

Orange-crowned Warbler near Farmers Market (2 January!!)
Black-legged Kittiwake (14 January at Stewart Park with Jessie and Jeff;
and Long Point 30 October)
Yellow-headed Blackbird at Hog Hole 10 March
Yellow-throated Warbler at Fuertes Bird Sanctuary 9 May
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron at Montezuma Knox-Marsellus 27 July (I guess I
like yellow)
Flock of 7 Willet from Hog Hole / Stewart Park 5 August
Franklin's Gull Montezuma Towpath Rd 10 Oct
Cave Swallow at Myers Point 31 October
Purple Sandpiper at Long Point 31 October
Snowy Egret at Long Point then refound at Stewart Park/Hog Hole 1 November

10. Prothonotary Warbler. Myers Point and Salt Point. 31 May. I was about
to leave Myers when I heard this bird singing. I have great luck birding
the last week of May and first 10 days of June, and this bird helps show
how productive this season can be. It raises so many questions. Where did
it come from? Did it already try to breed given the early arrival of many
of these birds? Was it a first-year male wandering looking for territories
for the next year? Very cool. I could see in many years where this would
have been the most exciting bird of the year! Bonus points since it was a
patch bird.

9. Parasitic Jaeger. My first Parasitic Jaeger anywhere in the interior of
the U.S away from the Great Lakes. I've seen dozens of inland Long-tailed
and Pomarines, so this was a treat. It was also the first rarity of the
tropical storm. NIce that the same bird flew down the lake and was seen by
many from Myers.

8. Red Phalarope. I arrived to Ithaca just after the last Red Phalarope in
Tompkins County during the last significant bird hurricane, so this was a
very nice bird to find at Hog Hole at the same time that Bill Evans was
finding it from Stewart Park. With all respect to Nathan Senner, this is
right up there with one of the coolest birds on earth.

7. Kentucky Warbler. Sapsucker Woods. 28 August. A completely unexpected
bird. I was birding with Dave Bell when he exclaimed Kentucky Warbler.
This bird was a real challenge to find, even if you were standing right
there when it was found. I'm glad I was standing next to him.

6.  Dickcissel at Seneca Meadows. 1 July 2012. This was exciting because
Jessie, Tom Johnson, Benjamin Clock and I decided that we were going to try
to find Dickcissel. We spent some time looking at Google Earth and checked
several places, but this was the location we thought was most likely to
have them. What made this different from many such adventures is that they
were actually here! We saw two singing males, and several other people were
able to enjoy these for several weeks.  To me, this highlights the value of
using eBird to see what species are showing up in nearby regions and then
looking for similar habitats or locations and trying to find those species
there. Part of the fun of birding for me is the treasure hunt aspect, and
being able to understand bird movements and then successfully predict where
to find other individuals is very rewarding.
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/dickcissel2012

5. Western Grebe. Myers Point and much of Cayuga Lake. At least two
individuals on the lake, if not three. Crazy.

4. Leach's Storm-Petrel. Frontenac Park. 30 October 2012. My first
storm-petrel for Cayuga Lake. Need I say more?

3. LeConte's Sparrow. The sexiest sparrow. Certainly illustrates well the
value of checking the same area repeatedly. Nice find Tom!!

2. Curlew Sandpiper. A bird I've only seen 4 times before. Always fun to go
birding with Tom Johnson. We found it in fading evening light at a great
distance. Luckily it remained for a few days for many to enjoy.

1. Ross's Gull at Long Point 30 October. Doesn't get much better than this!
A rare pink arctic gull. So many things to say, but certainly the bird of
the year and my favorite of any I've found in New York. 

[cayugabirds-l] Golden Eagle

2013-01-05 Thread Christopher Wood
Headed south from Park Preserve.

Chris Wood


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Re:[cayugabirds-l] [nfc-l] migrating cuckoos

2012-06-07 Thread Christopher Wood
While a different species, the British Trust for Ornithology has done
some fascinating work on Common Cuckoo migration. Individuals were
already moving south in the first half of June (a month earlier than
anticipated). Take a look at the link below.

http://www.bto.org/science/migration/tracking-studies/cuckoo-tracking

Certainly there are different life history traits, but I expect that
Black-billed and Yellow-billed Cuckoos in North America will shatter
conventional wisdom of what they do here. The speed at which cuckoos
fledge is astonishing and I would not be at all surprised if many do
not linger very long in any location. But I'll be the first to admit
that I haven't a clue what cuckoos do, why they do it or when they do
it!

As technology develops I expect we will see more and more individuals
of a variety of species (perhaps particularly first-year males?) move
throughout the breeding season. Perhaps these summer breeding
season nocturnal flights and vocalizations are a way that that fairly
low-density species with ephemeral habitat/food encounter each other
and good habitat (either for that year or for a following year)?
Perhaps this is another reason why Sora, Virginia Rail are recorded
with fairly high regularity as calling flyovers in summer in areas
where they are otherwise generally uncommon (i.e. Tompkins County,
NY). They breed in habitats that change from year to year so a bit of
wanderlust could be advantageous for the following breeding season. I
think cuckoos face similar ephemeral challenges, but based on food
availability.

Fascinating stuff.

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu


On Thu, Jun 7, 2012 at 5:57 AM, Bill Evans wrev...@clarityconnect.com wrote:
 There’s a delightful old paper by Gerald Thayer describing the mid-summer,
 mid-night, mid-sky gyrations of the Black-billed Cuckoo, as noted by my
 father and me for three consecutive seasons in the southwestern corner of
 New Hampshire:

 ”Several years before we discovered the nocturnal-flight phenomenon, we
 began to be puzzled by the extreme frequency of Cuckoo calls on summer
 nights. ***They uttered both the cow-row notes and the rolling guttural
 call; but the guttural was much the commoner of the two, except on dark,
 foggy nights, when the case was usually reversed. ***The birds were often so
 far up as to be only faintly audible when directly overhead, with no
 obstructions interposed; and this on a still night would seem to mean an
 elevation of at least a hundred and fifty yards. They sometimes flew lower,
 however, and on cloudy nights often moved about barely above the tree-tops.”
 “On the evening of July 11-a pitch-dark evening with a thundershower
 lowering,-they were remarkably noisy, both sitting in trees and flying high
 in air. The seated ones, of which I heard only two, made the Cowcow notes,
 while all the flying ones made the liquid gurgle. I heard this note overhead
 between thirty and forty times in the course of about three hours, during
 half of which time I was afoot on the road.”

 -- Thayer, G. H. 1903. The Mystery of the Black-billed Cuckoo. Bird Lore
 5:143-145.

 In a big nocturnal flight I heard moving up the St. Croix River (MN/WI) in
 late May of 1985, I estimated a rate of passage of Black-billed Cuckoos in
 the range of 100 per hour for at least a few hours in the middle of the
 night. This was not a call total but a rate of vocal birds estimated by
 following multiple calls from apparently the same individual, and it was
 clear that these birds were migrants heading northbound. In 1988-1990 I
 began recording nocturnal flight calls each fall migration period in early
 July around Ithaca, NY and was surprised that in each season the highest
 rate of BBCU calling was in July through early August. There seemed to be a
 lot of variability in the number of calls I recorded between proximal
 nights, which could be a function of weather/wind and microphone pickup
 dynamics or that the birds tended to prefer some nights over others. In the
 big passerine push from mid –August through mid-September across central NY,
 BBCU flight calls are less common than one might expect. Using a Sennheiser
 shotgun mic back in those days, my rates of BBCU nocturnal flight call
 detection in the latter half of August were in the 1-2 per hour range
 (averaged over whole night). In the first half of September rates dropped to
 the range of one call every four hours. Whereas in July through early August
 it was common to record sustained rate through the night of 4-5 per hour.
 But as I mentioned there was a lot of variability from night to night.

 I haven’t recorded much in June in central NY, but my impression has been
 that the breeding ground flight calling,  the “mid-summer, mid-night,
 mid-sky, gyrations”,  is a phenomenon that increases in July.

 Bill E

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[cayugabirds-l] Myers Point - Iceland Gull

2012-04-09 Thread Christopher Wood
Jessie and I went to Myers for about an hour this morning. There were
a few birds moving up the lake including 2 Red-necked Grebes, 1 Horned
Grebe, a few Common Loons, 26 Red-breasted Mergansers and a few
cormorants and scattered bands of Tree Swallows.

The most unexpected bird was a first-year Iceland Gull, which is only
the third that I have seen at Myers (and also the latest I have seen
in Tompkins County).

The complete list with notes is at the link below. By late tonight,
I'll have photos embedded.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S10396015

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Tape playing versus habitat loss

2012-04-09 Thread Christopher Wood
I find the discusion on tape playing interesting in part because of
the number of responses it has gathered. At the same time, a post from
Kevin McGowan about the draining of one of the best wetlands in
Tompkins County (George Road Pond) didn't draw a single comment. I was
a bit surprised that no discussion ensued about what types of permits
are required to drain wetlands. Did the Town of Dryden or George
Junior or whoever decided to / approved draining obtain the
appropriate permits? What permits are required? Was the wetland large
enough to have federal protection? How are wetlands defined? What can
we do to try to bring this local gem back or at the very least try to
create something similar?

I guess we were too focused on the dangers of tape playing and
pishing. Or maybe it's just easier to question and nit-pick each other
over the nuances of the 1% of things we don't already agree on.

I think it ties into one of the more fundamental conservation
challenges. It is easy to have a quick and passionate dislike of
something like hunting or playing tape because we think we can see
what happens. It happens to a single individual and it is very easy
for us to empathize with that individual. But the benefits of hunting
and tape playing are indirect (and often do not accrue to that
individual). When leaders on SFO show people birds they wouldn't
otherwise be able to appreciate without occasional and judicious use
of tape, the benefits are not immediate. Instead, they are one of many
building blocks that we hope will inspire more people to care about
birds and engage others to care. I welcome the challenge of having
every kid in New York so interested in seeing a Virginia Rail, that
they wanted to go to a marsh and play their iPhone in hopes of seeing
one.

When I went to George Road yesterday, there weren't tens of thousands
of birds of 150 different species lying dead on the ground. The
Ring-necked Ducks that would have used it for courtship just weren't
there. The migrant shorebirds that may have been knocked down in the
rain, just weren't there. Not much of anything was there. But I
couldn't see the damage. It didn't cause a gut reaction. So I went
home. I made dinner. And then I read my email about the perils of tape
playing.

If only habitat loss could inspire the same passions as pishing.

Chris Wood
Ithaca, New York

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park Lesser Black-backed Gulls (5!); Bufflehead and Pine Warbler videos

2012-03-27 Thread Christopher Wood
I'd like to point out a misstatement in my post about second-cycle
Slaty-backed Gull versus Lesser Black-backed Gulls. It was not Ontario that
accepted a Lesser Black-backed Gull as a Slaty-backed Gull.

My point was that some second-cycle Lesser Black-backed Gulls have been
confused by some very good birders. When we see something interesting, it's
great to get other people out there to see it. I spent two hours with a
second-year bird one summer in Colorado that I was convinced was something
great (Western or hybrid thing). After more careful observation and talking
in through with several other observers, we all became convinced it was
just a Lesser Black-backed Gull. All of us make mistakes and I suspect
I've probably misidentified more birds than just about anyone on this list.
On good days, I like to think I've learned a bit in the process.

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu




 On Sun, Mar 25, 2012 at 9:03 PM, Christopher Wood 
 chris.w...@cornell.eduwrote:

 After hearing about Ken and Jay's interesting gull I decided to meet
 Jessie at Stewart Park where we were eventually able to see what we are
 fairly confident is the same interesting gull (based on some photos that
 Ken sent me while I was there--THANK KEN!).  The pattern of replacement in
 the wing coverts and tail appear identical to my eyes. We had the luxury of
 seeing this bird in direct comparison with an adult Lesser Black-backed
 Gull and was able to get some video, which you can see at the link below.
 The side-by-side comparison has made me believe that this is a Lesser
 Black-backed Gull.

 https://vimeo.com/39164762

 I'm reminded again how troublesome second and third-year Lesser
 Black-backed Gulls can be. They usually are bit paler mantled, and it seems
 as if they often appear a bit shorter-winged. I believe what was once the
 first or second record of Slaty-backed Gull for Ontario was in fact also a
 Lesser Black-backed Gull and accepted by the entire Ontario Records
 committee --  just to give an idea of how challenging these birds can be. I
 think part of this impression is due to the extensive black tip to the bill
 of second-year Lesser Black-backed Gull, which creates the impression that
 they are bigger-billed than they really are. Nevertheless, I think if you
 look at the video where it is interacting with an adult Lesser Black-backed
 it has an extremely similar structure. I hope this will clear up any
 confusion. You'll note some differences in aging as well. Aging second and
 third-year gulls is far more complicated than standard field guides have
 room to illustrate. Not, however, the extensive pattern of brown in the
 wings and the tail pattern are normal for a 2nd-year Lesser Black-backed
 Gull not a third year which I belive would have much more extensive slaty
 feathers in the wings.

 There were, in fact, 4 adult Lesser Black-backed Gulls and 1 second-year
 bird at Stewart this evening! Pretty amazing. This makes 5 spankingly
 handsome breeding Lesser Black-backed Gulls (and a second-year) presumably
 all heading north over Cayuga Lake today and dropped by the weather (Tim
 had one farther north too -- not the wintering one).  I wonder where they
 are going and why they appear to be taking this inland route. Perhaps there
 is a US breeding ground and perhaps it is father west than we have tended
 to assume.

 I also uploaded some video of courting Bufflehead. Courting ducks in
 general are among the most captivating birds there are and Bufflehead may
 well be in a league of their own. I took the video below up at Long Point
 yesterday. Do yourself a favor in the next week or two and head to the lake
 and find some Bufflehead. Instead of passing your scope over them to find
 Long-tailed Ducks, stop and watch them. Right now they are at there best!
  At the very least, check out the video. Then call in sick tomorrow and go
 find some Bufflehead! (NOT YOU TIM LENZ, we have work to do!!)

 https://vimeo.com/39138904

 Finally, I also uploaded some video of Pine Warbler from Monkey Run.

 https://vimeo.com/39080251

 If you explore elsewhere there are some videos of a Red-tailed Hawk
 eating a Common Loon, millions or Red-winged Blackbirds and some other
 stuff.

 Anyway, THANKS Ken for getting the word out about the gull. Certainly an
 interesting bird. I'm sure I would have been confused had a few adult
 Lesser Black-backed Gulls not dropped in.

 Good birding,
 Chris Wood

 PS - A couple other weekend highlights included a VERY EARLY singing male
 Yellow Palm Warbler at the odd locale of Mackenzie Childs Bluffs. I also
 saw and heard Red Crossbill (I believe type 1) along Station Road near the
 big pulloff above where you typically enter to go look for Worm-eating
 Warblers by walking the ridge line to Lindsay Parsons.


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[cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park Lesser Black-backed Gulls (5!); Bufflehead and Pine Warbler videos

2012-03-25 Thread Christopher Wood
After hearing about Ken and Jay's interesting gull I decided to meet Jessie
at Stewart Park where we were eventually able to see what we are fairly
confident is the same interesting gull (based on some photos that Ken sent
me while I was there--THANK KEN!).  The pattern of replacement in the wing
coverts and tail appear identical to my eyes. We had the luxury of seeing
this bird in direct comparison with an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull and
was able to get some video, which you can see at the link below. The
side-by-side comparison has made me believe that this is a Lesser
Black-backed Gull.

https://vimeo.com/39164762

I'm reminded again how troublesome second and third-year Lesser
Black-backed Gulls can be. They usually are bit paler mantled, and it seems
as if they often appear a bit shorter-winged. I believe what was once the
first or second record of Slaty-backed Gull for Ontario was in fact also a
Lesser Black-backed Gull and accepted by the entire Ontario Records
committee --  just to give an idea of how challenging these birds can be. I
think part of this impression is due to the extensive black tip to the bill
of second-year Lesser Black-backed Gull, which creates the impression that
they are bigger-billed than they really are. Nevertheless, I think if you
look at the video where it is interacting with an adult Lesser Black-backed
it has an extremely similar structure. I hope this will clear up any
confusion. You'll note some differences in aging as well. Aging second and
third-year gulls is far more complicated than standard field guides have
room to illustrate. Not, however, the extensive pattern of brown in the
wings and the tail pattern are normal for a 2nd-year Lesser Black-backed
Gull not a third year which I belive would have much more extensive slaty
feathers in the wings.

There were, in fact, 4 adult Lesser Black-backed Gulls and 1 second-year
bird at Stewart this evening! Pretty amazing. This makes 5 spankingly
handsome breeding Lesser Black-backed Gulls (and a second-year) presumably
all heading north over Cayuga Lake today and dropped by the weather (Tim
had one farther north too -- not the wintering one).  I wonder where they
are going and why they appear to be taking this inland route. Perhaps there
is a US breeding ground and perhaps it is father west than we have tended
to assume.

I also uploaded some video of courting Bufflehead. Courting ducks in
general are among the most captivating birds there are and Bufflehead may
well be in a league of their own. I took the video below up at Long Point
yesterday. Do yourself a favor in the next week or two and head to the lake
and find some Bufflehead. Instead of passing your scope over them to find
Long-tailed Ducks, stop and watch them. Right now they are at there best!
 At the very least, check out the video. Then call in sick tomorrow and go
find some Bufflehead! (NOT YOU TIM LENZ, we have work to do!!)

https://vimeo.com/39138904

Finally, I also uploaded some video of Pine Warbler from Monkey Run.

https://vimeo.com/39080251

If you explore elsewhere there are some videos of a Red-tailed Hawk eating
a Common Loon, millions or Red-winged Blackbirds and some other stuff.

Anyway, THANKS Ken for getting the word out about the gull. Certainly an
interesting bird. I'm sure I would have been confused had a few adult
Lesser Black-backed Gulls not dropped in.

Good birding,
Chris Wood

PS - A couple other weekend highlights included a VERY EARLY singing male
Yellow Palm Warbler at the odd locale of Mackenzie Childs Bluffs. I also
saw and heard Red Crossbill (I believe type 1) along Station Road near the
big pulloff above where you typically enter to go look for Worm-eating
Warblers by walking the ridge line to Lindsay Parsons.

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[cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park Myers

2012-02-23 Thread Christopher Wood
Several of us checked Stewart Park this morning and did NOT see the
Eurasian Wigeon. When I first arrived there were over 163 Northern
Pintail and 88 American Wigeon, but many took off to the north shortly
thereafter. Highlights included two male American Green-winged Teal,
two Killdeer and good views of lots of ducks.

A complete eBird list is at the link below.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S9985653

Myers Point highlights included Western Grebe, adult male White-winged
Scoter, Snow Bunting, and American Pipit.

Checklist here:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S9986061

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Common Raven -- Lettie Cook Woods

2012-02-20 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi everyone,

On our way back to Ithaca this morning, Jessie and I saw a Common
Raven circling and soaring fairly low just north of Lettie Cook Woods
(visible from the north side of the woods). I know Brad Walker saw one
here in early February.

Chris Wood

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Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Gray Catbird at Monkey Run

2012-01-20 Thread Christopher Wood
After arriving home this evening I took a quick walk along the old
railroad tracks that go from Monkey Run road toward Hwy 13. About 1/2
along the trial, I saw a Gray Catbird on the south side of the trail.
This is roughly 400 meters east of Monkey Run Road along the trail. I
didn't have my camera, but was able to get some quick photos with my
iPhone through the scope. While very poor, the bird is easily
identifiable. See eBird checklist below.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S9638949

I'm intrigued by the pattern of reports for Gray Catbird in winter
along Fall Creek. The Gray Catbird that Jessie and I saw here in 2010,
we didn't find until 20 February. Ryan Douglas found the Cornell
Campus bird in the winter of 2009 on the 20th of January, and the one
at Comstock Knoll/Winter Garden in 2007 was first found by Brad Walker
on 1 February. I know there are a couple reports of Gray Catbird in
the last 10 years or so on the CBC, which weren't reported to eBird
and I have no idea where they were. I suspect some of these catbirds
may be in the general area and then move toward the somewhat more
stable and food-rich areas along Fall Creek. But I wonder just how far
some of these birds move. I suspect if we covered areas like the
Farmers Market and along other creeks regularly, we may find other
birds that show up as the weather changes. This is certainly a great
winter for half-hardy species, by far the best since I have been in
Ithaca!

Good birding,

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Western Grebe?

2012-01-11 Thread Christopher Wood
Did anyone look for the grebe this morning? There are quite a few
people from other parts of the state and around here who would like to
see it, so please post if you do go look for it.

Thanks,
Chris Wood

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[cayugabirds-l] Illegal hunting on the south end of Cayuga Lake

2012-01-04 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi everyone,

The past couple of days I have noticed that the hunters at the south
end of Cayuga Lake have been using a boat to chase and flush the
flocks of Redhead, scaup and other waterfowl. I was amazed that you
could drive a motorboat up and down the lake to flush flocks of
resting ducks . . . repeatedly. Such actions have energetic costs that
extend to the entire flock. I decided to do a bit of sleuthing, and it
turns out that it is illegal.

The following is all taken from the NY DEC web site.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/wildlife_pdf/wfregsguide11.pdf

PROHIBITIONS ON METHODS OF TAKE
No person shall take migratory game birds:

• From or with the aid or use of a car or other motor‐driven land
vehicle, or any aircraft, except that paraplegics and single or double
amputees of the legs may, with a permit issued by the Department of
Environmental Conservation, take from any stationary motor vehicle or
stationary motor‐driven land vehicle. “Paraplegic” means an individual
afflicted with paralysis of the lower half of the body with
involvement of both legs, usually due to disease or injury to the
spinal cord.

• From or by means of any motorboat or sailboat unless the motor has
been completely shut off and/or sail furled, and its progress has
ceased. Motorboats and sailboats under power may be used to retrieve
dead or crippled birds; however crippled birds may not be shot from
such craft under power except in the Special Sea Duck Area described
in the Hunting Seasons Table.

• By driving, rallying or chasing birds with any motorized vehicle or
any sailboat to put them in the range of hunters.

Reports from citizens are vital for effective enforcement of New
York's environmental laws. There are more than 300 Environmental
Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) and Investigators in New York
State, each patrolling an average of 400 square miles. You can help by
reporting every Environmental Conservation Law (ECL) violation that
you observe or suspect.

TIPP DEC is a 24-hour telephone hotline that is also referred to as
Turn in Poachers and Polluters. It is answered by live dispatchers.
The TIPP phone number is 1-800-TIPP DEC (1-800-847-7332). Callers may
request to file a complaint anonymously. Citizens can also report a
violation online:

http://www.dec.ny.gov/regulations/393.html

Best,
Chris Wood

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[cayugabirds-l] Ross's Goose at Sapsucker Woods (flyover)

2012-01-03 Thread Christopher Wood
Jessie and I just had a single adult Ross's Goose with the flock of ca
325 Snow Geese that flew directly over the on-time (versus early or
late) parking lot at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Notes from eBird
below.

 The Ross's was near the middle of the flock, and caused a break in
the line of the flock line because it sped up and slowed down,
apparently unable to keep exact pace with the Snow Geese. This bird
was completely obvious, with a much shorter neck, very short bill and
about 1/2 the size of any other bird in the flock. The flock flew
directly overhead, less than 200 meters above, one of the lowest
Ross's (and lowest flocks of migrating Snow Geese) we have seen in New
York. Light snow and NW wind certainly contributed to the low flight
line. The flock was migrating south on the heels of the first real
cold front of the winter, with temps dropping into the single digits
last night.

Best,
Chris Wood

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[cayugabirds-l] Hog Hole yesterday -- Thayer's Gull, 4 geese sp.

2011-12-18 Thread Christopher Wood
Sorry for the late post. Yesterday evening I went to Hog Hole where
the Thayer's Gull was resting on the docks in the marina. Other
highlights below.

Hog Hole Ithaca, Tompkins, US-NY
Dec 17, 2011 4:01 PM - 4:51 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.9 mile(s)
Comments:     I came here to see if there were any interesting geese
or other birds following the AMAZING movement of Canada and Snow Geese
elsewhere. There were a fair number of Canadas here, and judging by
the presence of a Cackling Goose, I suspect that many of these were
different from the ones roosting here each evening. In addition, there
were also some Canada that continued flying south even at sunset. The
only Snow Goose was a blue morph bird in with the Canadas. The biggest
surprise was a juvenile Thayer's Gull -- it appeared identical to and
was certainly the same bird I found on 9 December at the compost
piles. I don't believe it has been seen since about the 11th.
25 species (+1 other taxa)

Snow Goose (Chen caerulescens)  1     Blue morph adult with Canadas in marina.
Brant (Atlantic) (Branta bernicla hrota)  2     Continuing juveniles.
Along with all the geese we saw in flight today on the Cortland CBC,
this made by SIXTH goose species for the day -- a new high species
count for me in Upstate New York.
Cackling Goose (Richardson's) (Branta hutchinsii hutchinsii)  1
One adult in with a flock of Canada that came in and landed in the
marina. Excellent views in flight and on the ground. A fairly typical
Richardson's with a silvery upperparts, pale breast, no neck ring.
Much smaller than CANG with shorter bill.
Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)  1285     Close to an exact count as
bird came into roost and others (20% continued moving south).
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  350     Very rough estimate -- most
birds were off Stewart Park.
Canvasback (Aythya valisineria)  1     Male off of Stewart Park
Redhead (Aythya americana)  10
Greater Scaup (Aythya marila)  3
Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis)  16
Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola)  21
Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula)  7
Hooded Merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus)  29     Exact count included
birds off of the red jetty and another flock that flew over.
Common Merganser (Mergus merganser)  42
Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)  1     Adult.
Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis)  350
Herring Gull (American) (Larus argentatus smithsonianus)  470     * My
highest count yet of the fall/winter.
Thayer's Gull (Larus thayeri)  1     Juvenile. Almost certainly the
same bird that I found on 9 December, though it hadn't been seen in
almost a week. There were no differences at all from the bird I found
before, including the very limited pale at the base of the bill (not
typical, but not rare in juv THGU on this date). Upperwring patterning
also identical as was overall coloration.
Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus)  75
gull sp. (Larinae sp.)  1     A very distant white-winged gull
Glaucous / Iceland / Thayer's type bird that was probably a pure
Iceland Gull. Either a first or second-winter bird. Pale brown below,
not gleaming white.
Rock Pigeon (Columba livia)  20
Hairy Woodpecker (Eastern) (Picoides villosus [villosus Group])  1
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)  1
Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus)  1
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (Junco hyemalis hyemalis/carolinensis)  1
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)  2
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  1

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Chris Wood
Ithaca, NY

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[cayugabirds-l] Hog Hole -- House Wren

2011-12-14 Thread Christopher Wood
Hog Hole Ithaca, Tompkins, US-NYDec 14, 2011 8:26 AM - 9:12
AMProtocol: Traveling1.0 mile(s)Comments:     A very nice day. Mostly
clear. Calm. I was hoping for Purple Sandpiper, given the large number
along Lake Ontario right now, but no luck. The biggest surprise was a
HOUSE WREN -- the latest that I have seen in Tompkins County and also
the latest in eBird.

38 species
Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)  290Gadwall (Anas strepera)
3American Wigeon (Anas americana)  2American Black Duck (Anas
rubripes)  11Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  260Redhead (Aythya
americana)  11Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola)  18Common Goldeneye
(Bucephala clangula)  14Hooded Merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus)
7Common Merganser (Mergus merganser)  8Common Loon (Gavia immer)
4Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias)  1     Juvenile.Cooper's Hawk
(Accipiter cooperii)  1     Juvenile perched in trees north of parking
area.Red-tailed Hawk (Eastern) (Buteo jamaicensis borealis)  1American
Coot (Fulica americana)  150     Rough estimate by 10s. Birds fairly
distant off of Stewart Park.Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis)
25Herring Gull (American) (Larus argentatus smithsonianus)  12Great
Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus)  6Rock Pigeon (Columba livia)
45Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon)  1     Male.Red-bellied
Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus)  2Downy Woodpecker (Eastern)
(Picoides pubescens pubescens/medianus)  2Hairy Woodpecker (Eastern)
(Picoides villosus [villosus Group])  1Northern Flicker
(Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus [auratus Group])  2Blue Jay
(Cyanocitta cristata)  4American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)
7Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)  3Tufted Titmouse
(Baeolophus bicolor)  2White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) (Sitta
carolinensis carolinensis)  2Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus)
4House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)  1     ** Very late. This the latest
House Wren I have ever observed and also the latest recorded in eBird
in Tompkins County. The bird was calling from about 30 meters south of
the lakeshore on the west side of the trail where the cottonwoods stop
and transition into a mix of shrubs and grass. The bird was alone, but
two Carolina Wrens were in the trees behind. From Winter Wren by
longer tail, very different call (fairly dry harsh scolding notes),
only a hint of barring on flanks, and indistinct eyeline. From
Carolina by lack of bold white supercilum, much duller upperparts,
duller underparts, smaller size and voice.European Starling (Sturnus
vulgaris)  80     Many feeding on grapes.American Tree Sparrow
(Spizella arborea)  3Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (Junco hyemalis
hyemalis/carolinensis)  2Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)
1Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  1     Adult male.American
Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  15House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)  8
This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Chris Wood

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Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Eared Grebe

2011-12-09 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi Dave,

I have some video here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinicola/6483250349/in/photostream

And a photo here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinicola/6483156077/in/photostream/

Both were taken through a scope with an iPhone and reflect that level
of quality. Still, better than nothing.

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu



On Fri, Dec 9, 2011 at 1:05 PM,  tigge...@aol.com wrote:
 If anyone gets photos of the bird, even really bad ones, I would appreciate
 it if they could post them.  I am curious about the plumage details and if
 they are similar to a grebe I saw on Monday on Onondaga Lake.  (presuming
 the Onondaga Lake bird has left -off to look right now).  Thanks!

 Dave Wheeler
 N Syracuse, NY
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Thayer's Gull - Stevenson Rd. compost piles (Dryden)

2011-12-09 Thread Christopher Wood
The Thayer's Gull was still there when I left about 1:05. Thanks, Tom,
for posting. We miss you and look forward to your return to the Basin.

I was able to get a few photos that you can see in my eBird checklist
at the link below. This is a fairly normal-looking juvenile Thayer's
Gull (to the extent such a thing exists). I suspect it would be easier
to pass this off as a Herring Gull than an Iceland Gull. When scanning
through 1st-year Herring Gulls, look for the paler upperparts and note
that the primaries on this bird are dark brown, not black as in
Herring Gull. It's a bit more obvious in flight when the paler
underwing stands out, as does the distinctive upperwing pattern.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S9303125

See this story for information on how to embed photos in an eBird checklist:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/embed-photos-in-your-checklists

Best wishes,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu



On Fri, Dec 9, 2011 at 12:54 PM, Tom Johnson t...@cornell.edu wrote:
 Cayugabirders,
 Chris Wood reports a juvenile Thayer's Gull at the compost piles on
 Stevenson Rd., Dryden.
 Good birding,
 Tom

 --
 Tom Johnson
 Hummelstown, PA
 t...@cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Hog Hole Clay-colored Sparrow, Nelson's Sparrow, Marsh Wren

2011-10-18 Thread Christopher Wood
Ken Rosenberg, Arvind Panjabi and I saw several nice birds at Hog Hole this
AM. It was as good as I have seen it with lots of sparrows (e.g. 120 Song;
75 Swamp).

The Clay-colored Sparrow was near the easternmost bluebird box that has a
little shrub growing next to it. The Marsh Wren was in the field east of the
Osprey platform. The Nelson's was on the south end of the lake in the
typical location.

Also flyover Greater Yellowlegs.

Thanks,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Least Bittern -- Hog Hole

2011-09-06 Thread Christopher Wood
Jessie and I went Hog Hole this evening, not knowing of all the fun at
Stewart Park. In addition to excellent views of the adult Franklin's Gull,
we had what was in many ways almost a bigger surprise -- an adult male Least
Bittern that we saw in flight! I considered this to be one of my more
overdue Tompkins county birds, which I knew I would eventually hear flying
over some evening (having heard recordings of several that Steve Kelling has
had over his house). But to see it while in flight while it was still light
enough to see very well, was certainly a big surprise.

From my eBird notes:

Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis)  1 ***Presumably a rare but regular
migrant in the county, but infrequently detected away when not heard as a
nocturnal migrant. County bird for both CLW and JHB. Found at 7:44pm when it
came flying out from the behind the trees on the NW side of Hog Hole, where
it was almost certainly roosting in the cattail marsh for the day. Very good
views in flight. First noticed floppy quick wingbeats, very different from
Green Heron, with wingbeats much deeper and quicker. Legs appeared to be
somewhat longer.  Adult male with black crown and upperparts. Wings showed
bold and extensive buff contrasting boldly with rest of upperwing (unlike
uniformly, or nearly uniformly dark upperwing of Green Heron).

Not too often that we get two county birds in one day!

Cheers,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] BCNH at Myers yesterday

2011-08-31 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi everyone,

You may want to take a look at the eBird bar charts to give you an
idea of what birds have been seen at Myers Point, Sapsucker Woods,
Tompkins county or any state, county or birding location anywhere in
the world. Whenever I go to a new location, or even to learn more
about the birds around here, I look at the bar charts to better
understand when to look for birds (and where).

The link below is just for Myers Point, which has some fairly nice bar
charts given the good eBird coverage in Tompkins County.

http://tinyurl.com/myerspoint

Or the full URL below:

http://ebird.org/ebird/GuideMe?step=saveChoicesgetLocations=hotspotsparentState=US-NYbMonth=01bYear=1900eMonth=12eYear=2011reportType=locationhotspots=L99615hotspots=L283458continue.x=42continue.y=9continue=Continue

If you click on the name of any species name on the bar chart, you can
explore high counts, and also see a map that shows all the locations
where the species has been seen (in this case, we are looking at Myers
Point, so you will only see that location. If you click on the google
marker on the map, you can see who saw the species, when and how many
were recorded. So for Myers Point, you can see that there are 19
different reports of Black-crowned Night-Heron (many involving the
same bird). It looks like this bird was first reported the 24th of
July and has been seen off and on since then. Perhaps someone saw it
earlier. If so, feel free to enter it into eBird. :)

Thanks,
Chris Wood
Ithaca, New York



On Wed, Aug 31, 2011 at 5:46 PM, Jill Vaughan jil...@gmail.com wrote:
 Around 9 a.m. yesterday at Myers, a friend and I saw what we thought was an
 immature Black-crowned Night Heron. We returned home to consult several
 books, and visit three websites; the result was that we were reasonably
 comfortable with our identification. However, since I lacked the confidence
 in our skills, and since I did not think there was much history of BCNH(s)
 at Myers, I did not post.  I appreciate the post by Cir82 that confirmed our
 identification.
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[cayugabirds-l] Irene's birds; Sapsucker Woods warblers this AM

2011-08-29 Thread Christopher Wood
I had similar lack of success checking the east side of Cayuga Lake
yesterday. I probably should have stayed at Hog Hole, which was the only
location with anything of note, highlighted by an American Avocet and some
other interesting shorebirds. It seemed this far to the west in New York,
the storm did little other than drop migrants and provide conditions for a
nice night of migration last night. There were a good variety of warblers
this AM at Sapsucker Woods including Mourning, Hooded, Black-throated Blue,
Blackburnian, Bay-breasted, Magnolia. Complete list from Hog Hole yesterday
is below.

Hog Hole Ithaca, Tompkins Co.
Aug 28, 2011 8:05 AM - 9:20 AM
Protocol: Traveling; 0.9 mile(s)
Comments: Came here hoping that what was once Hurricane Irene would drop
some birds. We were on the west side what had become a tropical storm, but
there was not much. This was far and away the best stop of the day, however,
highlighted by several shorebirds which I had never seen at Hog Hole before.
The best was an American Avocet, which flew over calling. The best viewing
was on the northeast side where I was somewhat protected by the 40+ mph
gusts and rain. It was a wet 75 minutes and conditions eventually forced me
back to the car and more lazy birding that was closer to the car.
26 species

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)  90
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  25
Green-winged Teal (American) (Anas crecca carolinensis)  2
Hooded Merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus)  1
Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)  75
Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)  2
American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana)  1 **Rare. I was scanning the
lake through the scope when I heard it calling right overhead. I looked up
and saw it flying to the northwest, but soon lost it behind the trees. Had a
trace of buff on underparts but viewing conditions made it impossible for me
to tell for certain that it was an adult (I thought it was).
Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius)  2
Sanderling (Calidris alba)  3 In a tight flock that flew over the jetty
(with a single Semipalmated Sandpiper).
Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris pusilla)  1
Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla)  12
White-rumped Sandpiper (Calidris fuscicollis)  1 *Uncommon in Tompkins
County. In flock of Least Sandpipers. Larger than Least Sandpipers, with
longer wings and distinctive bold white rump.
Baird's Sandpiper (Calidris bairdii)  1 *Uncommon in Tompkins County. In
flock of Least Sandpipers. Larger than Least Sandpipers, with longer wings.
Was with the WRSA and had very similar shape but was buffy overall, lacked a
white rump. The WRSA and BASA stayed together while the flock wheeled about.
Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis)  60
Herring Gull (American) (Larus argentatus smithsonianus)  13
Great Black-backed Gull (Larus marinus)  4
Caspian Tern (Hydroprogne caspia)  11
Common Tern (Sterna hirundo)  1 *Uncommon migrant. Adult in flight north
of Stewart Park. There may have been two birds but I never saw them at the
same time.
Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon)  1
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  1
Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia)  80
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)  75
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  1
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  1
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  2
House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)  1

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2 (http://ebird.org)


Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Lindsay Parsons -- Cerulean, Worm-eating and Parula

2011-07-23 Thread Christopher Wood
Lindsay-Parsons Preserve, Tompkins, US-NY
Jul 23, 2011 5:49 AM - 8:09 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.2 mile(s)
Comments: During the middle of a very hot spell in Ithaca, with
temps in the last two days reaching well into the 90s. Conditions when
we were here somewhat better with temp  78-83F (still hot for this
early)! Calm wind. Clear. Most bird song had ended with only a few
warblers singing the odd song. Highlights included a singing male
CERULEAN WARBLER, a NORTHERN PARULA and a WORM-EATING WARBLER!!
OBSERVERS: Chris Wood and Jessie Barry. 62 species

Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)  31 4 females; all others males all either
eclipse or juv.
Green Heron (Butorides virescens)  1
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  2
Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica)  1 Flyover.
Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon)  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus)  2
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)  2
Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus)  2
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) (Colaptes auratus [auratus Group])  2
Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus)  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens)  1
Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii)  1
Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe)  1
Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus)  4
Yellow-throated Vireo (Vireo flavifrons)  5
Warbling Vireo (Eastern) (Vireo gilvus gilvus)  1
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)  15
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)  7
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  15
Northern Rough-winged Swallow (Stelgidopteryx serripennis)  1
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)  12
Cliff Swallow (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota)  1 Flying around and
calling near parking lot. First for Lindsay-Parsons in eBird.
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)  10
Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor)  7
White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) (Sitta carolinensis carolinensis)  2
House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)  1
Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis)  1
Veery (Catharus fuscescens)  3
Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina)  3
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  11
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)  8
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)  80 Flyovers heading north in
early morning (ca 6:00 - 6:15 am)
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  1
Blue-winged Warbler (Vermivora cyanoptera)  3
Northern Parula (Parula americana)  1 **Rare in mid-summer in
Tompkins County. A female (adult or 1st-summer, i.e. not recently
fledged). Molting body feathers.
Yellow Warbler (Dendroica petechia)  3
Chestnut-sided Warbler (Dendroica pensylvanica)  17 None showed any
sign of green to upperparts yet. One male in particular was only
slightly worn, appearing more like a bird in early June.
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) (Dendroica coronata coronata)  1
Cerulean Warbler (Dendroica cerulea)  1 **Rare/local in summer in
Tompkins County. A male sang twice from the woods on the west side of
the two main ponds, which we heard from about 150 meters away. We
walked over and eventually saw this male. We never heard it sing
again, but it did call several times. This is the first Cerulean
Warbler for the main portion of Lindsay Parsons in eBIrd. Chris T-H
and Martjan had one 14 June 2009 at Thatchers Pinnacles in the same
location where they and Utami found a breeding pair (and nest) atop
Thatcher's Pinnacles, just SW of the main Pinnacle in 2007.
Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia)  4
American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla)  1
Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum)  1 *Local/Rare in
summer. This bird was NOT up the far hillside (!!), but along the main
trail system right where the trail crosses the railroad tracks. First
detected the bird by high thin tssi-tssi flight notes. Also called
several times, a sharp hard dchik. We had exceptional views of the
bird which foraged at eye level for several minutes. The bird was in
very fresh plumage and appeared to be a first-year based only on the
very clear plumage (all other adult warblers we saw today except for
one Yellow were either molting or fairly worn).
Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla)  1
Louisiana Waterthrush (Parkesia motacilla)  1
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)  18
Hooded Warbler (Wilsonia citrina)  2
Eastern Towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus)  2
Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina)  1 Across from parking lot.
Field Sparrow (Spizella pusilla)  8
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  10
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) (Junco hyemalis hyemalis/carolinensis)  1
Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea)  3
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)  6
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus)  1
Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea)  6
Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus)  4 Flyovers heading north.
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  55 Mostly flyovers
heading north.
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)  230 98% flyovers heading
north in early morning (ca 6:00 - 6:15 am)
Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula)  10 Exact count. Two adult
males replacing tail.
Purple Finch (Eastern) (Carpodacus purpureus purpureus)  4
American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis)  7

Re: [cayugabirds-l] MNWR Shorebird highlights - Tuesday night

2011-07-20 Thread Christopher Wood
Puddlers Marsh is yet another name for Towpath Rd. It refers
specifically to the impoundment to the east of the dike marked with
the sign that says Absolutely no ATVs. The impoundment on the west
side is the Knox-Marcellus Marsh.

Many people do not differentiate these two since birds fly between the
two impoundments. So Knox-Marcellus is also be used to describe the
entire two impoundments, even though it may be technically more
accurate to say Towpath (as long as you aren't looking from East Rd)!

Basically, if anyone says Towpath, East Road, Knox-Marcellus Marsh or
Puddlers Marsh go up to that area and look around.

That should make things about as clear as the impoundment water, right?

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu



On Wed, Jul 20, 2011 at 11:55 AM, Carl Steckler c...@cornell.edu wrote:
 OK, it took us a while to finally figure out where Towpath Road was, but
 where is Puddlers marsh? It isn't on the google map of bird spots. can
 someone please give us directions?
 Thanks
 Carl  Meg


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[cayugabirds-l] Prothonotary Warbler fledglings

2011-07-10 Thread Christopher Wood
As Jay already reported, Jeff Gerbracht and I found FOUR very recently
fledged baby Prothonotary Warblers on the north side of Armitage Road
yesterday morning. They were very cute. So cute, in fact, that I had
to upload some photos of them as well as some other highlights from
yesterday. See link below.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinicola/

I think Jay posted most of our highlights already, but we also saw a
single male Greater Scaup on the west side of Cayuga Lake just north
of the Lakeshore Winery.

As others have mentioned, the shorebird habitat at East Road / Towpath
is excellent. If I were to adopt Matt Young's crossbill cone crop
ratings to shorebird habitat, I would give it a 4.5. It looses half a
point, because birds are very distant and best viewed early in the
morning before the heat shimmer begins. There were over 500 peeps
including a very early Baird's Sandpiper, as well as Wilson's
Phalarope and Stilt Sandpiper.

Cheers,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Brant v. rail bittern

2011-05-20 Thread Christopher Wood
Just saw a flock of 37 Brant flying up west side of inlet from Cass Park.

Virginia Rail and American Bittern calling at Fidlers Pond along 13a
south of Fidler rd and north of 13/96/34. Excellent views of both.
Don't understand why they like this area with heavy traffic, but I
have good luck with both here (particularly rail).

Chris Wood
Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org

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[cayugabirds-l] Freeville area flyover Red-headed Woodpecker and Upland Sandpiper

2011-05-20 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi all,

I headed out on 366 late this morning to check Hile School Road. At the
intersection of Hile School Road and Ed Hill Road (ne of Freeville) I saw a
RED-HEADED WOODPECKER flying overhead. It seemed to come out of the woods on
the sw side of this intersection and fly ENE. I lost it over the woodlot on
the ENE side of this intersection.

I also saw a flyover UPLAND SANDPIPER that was calling near the intersection
of Fall Creek Road and Cady Lane.  The bird was about 100 meters overhead
flying north. I tried to check nearby fields to see if it landed but never
found it again. It seems very late for a migrant, so I wonder if this bird
may be somewhere in the area and searching for a mate. It was certainly
unexpected.

In any event, it may be good to keep an eye out for either of these birds.

Good numbers of warblers and other migrants pretty much all over today. This
is one of those days where it just feels like there are birds around (hence
the day off).

Cheers,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Sapsucker Woods Caspian Tern

2011-05-19 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi everyone,

I just saw an adult Caspian Tern flying to the east over Sapsucker Woods.
The bird was visible from my window on the north side of the Cornell
Lab. This is the first Caspian Tern I have ever seen at Sapsucker Woods, and
at a very surprising time. I would have thought it much more likely to see
one from July - September when larger numbers are moving through the county.
This is the 149th species that I have seen from my office window.

Cheers,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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Re:[cayugabirds-l] Monkey Run South

2011-05-16 Thread Christopher Wood
I finished the day doing the loop in the sw side. I added Wood Duck
(99), Great Blue Heron (100), Ring-billed Gull (101) and finally
Black-throated Blue Warbler to end at 102. Hoped for cuckoos never
vocalized.

Chris Wood
Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org

On May 15, 2011, at 4:25 PM, Christopher Wood chris.w...@cornell.edu wrote:

 I decided to see how many birds I could find at Monkey Run South
 today. I walked all the trails on the south side of the river and
 spent quite a bit of time watching from the house. I am now up to 98
 species (22 warblers). I only added a single species in the last THREE
 hours, a Carolina Wren. There are certainly some easier ones like
 Black-throated Blue Warbler (biggest miss by far--had 6 yesterday,
 mostly singing too), Louisiana Waterthrush (Ugh!), Yellow-throated
 Vireo, both cuckoos (unbelievable on an day like this given how much
 they like to sing in the rain), Great Blue Heron, Winter Wren (not
 sure they breed on the south side anymore), maybe a White-crowned
 Sparrow or Field Sparrow. Not to mention raptors and other things that
 fly overhead; I've only had Red-tailed had Broad-winged Hawk today.
 Anyway, this is certainly my highest species total at Monkey Run. It
 is very enjoyable to walk around a relatively small area and see how
 many birds you can find. As Mark Chao has explained to me, you find
 more and more every time you go out on the trails even if you are
 covering the same trails you covered 30 minutes ago.

 Hopefully the rain will stop by about 6 or so (or at least not be
 quite so heavy as now). Bird activity was very good through about
 1:00pm.

 The totals below are the highest number of individuals I saw on any
 one of my several (5) eBird entries for the day.

 Canada Goose - Branta canadensis10
 Mallard - Anas platyrhynchos2
 Common Merganser - Mergus merganser1
 Ruffed Grouse - Bonasa umbellus2
 Wild Turkey - Meleagris gallopavo1
 Green Heron - Butorides virescens2
 Broad-winged Hawk - Buteo platypterus1
 Red-tailed Hawk - Buteo jamaicensis1
 American Coot - Fulica americana1
 Killdeer - Charadrius vociferus1
 Spotted Sandpiper - Actitis macularius2
 Rock Pigeon - Columba livia7
 Mourning Dove - Zenaida macroura4
 Eastern Screech-Owl - Megascops asio1
 Great Horned Owl - Bubo virginianus1
 Ruby-throated Hummingbird - Archilochus colubris4
 Belted Kingfisher - Megaceryle alcyon1
 Red-bellied Woodpecker - Melanerpes carolinus5
 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - Sphyrapicus varius4
 Downy Woodpecker - Picoides pubescens6
 Hairy Woodpecker - Picoides villosus2
 Northern Flicker - Colaptes auratus1
 Pileated Woodpecker - Dryocopus pileatus1
 Eastern Wood-Pewee - Contopus virens1
 Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - Empidonax flaviventris2
 Willow Flycatcher - Empidonax traillii1
 Least Flycatcher - Empidonax minimus1
 Eastern Phoebe - Sayornis phoebe4
 Great Crested Flycatcher - Myiarchus crinitus4
 Eastern Kingbird - Tyrannus tyrannus1
 Blue-headed Vireo - Vireo solitarius2
 Warbling Vireo - Vireo gilvus2
 Philadelphia Vireo - Vireo philadelphicus1
 Red-eyed Vireo - Vireo olivaceus17
 Blue Jay - Cyanocitta cristata14
 American Crow - Corvus brachyrhynchos6
 Northern Rough-winged Swallow - Stelgidopteryx serripennis10
 Tree Swallow - Tachycineta bicolor6
 Bank Swallow - Riparia riparia35
 Barn Swallow - Hirundo rustica1
 Black-capped Chickadee - Poecile atricapillus19
 Tufted Titmouse - Baeolophus bicolor10
 Red-breasted Nuthatch - Sitta canadensis1
 White-breasted Nuthatch - Sitta carolinensis2
 Brown Creeper - Certhia americana3
 Carolina Wren - Thryothorus ludovicianus1
 House Wren - Troglodytes aedon9
 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - Polioptila caerulea1
 Ruby-crowned Kinglet - Regulus calendula1
 Veery - Catharus fuscescens9
 Swainson's Thrush - Catharus ustulatus4
 Hermit Thrush - Catharus guttatus1
 Wood Thrush - Hylocichla mustelina7
 American Robin - Turdus migratorius13
 Gray Catbird - Dumetella carolinensis33
 European Starling - Sturnus vulgaris7
 Cedar Waxwing - Bombycilla cedrorum25
 Blue-winged Warbler - Vermivora cyanoptera6
 Tennessee Warbler - Oreothlypis peregrina6
 Nashville Warbler - Oreothlypis ruficapilla1
 Yellow Warbler - Dendroica petechia9
 Chestnut-sided Warbler - Dendroica pensylvanica17
 Magnolia Warbler - Dendroica magnolia11
 Cape May Warbler - Dendroica tigrina1
 Yellow-rumped Warbler - Dendroica coronata5
 Black-throated Green Warbler - Dendroica virens1
 Blackburnian Warbler - Dendroica fusca5
 Pine Warbler - Dendroica pinus11
 Bay-breasted Warbler - Dendroica castanea5
 Blackpoll Warbler - Dendroica striata1
 Black-and-white Warbler - Mniotilta varia3
 American Redstart - Setophaga ruticilla21
 Ovenbird - Seiurus aurocapilla8
 Northern

[cayugabirds-l] Monkey Run South

2011-05-15 Thread Christopher Wood
I decided to see how many birds I could find at Monkey Run South
today. I walked all the trails on the south side of the river and
spent quite a bit of time watching from the house. I am now up to 98
species (22 warblers). I only added a single species in the last THREE
hours, a Carolina Wren. There are certainly some easier ones like
Black-throated Blue Warbler (biggest miss by far--had 6 yesterday,
mostly singing too), Louisiana Waterthrush (Ugh!), Yellow-throated
Vireo, both cuckoos (unbelievable on an day like this given how much
they like to sing in the rain), Great Blue Heron, Winter Wren (not
sure they breed on the south side anymore), maybe a White-crowned
Sparrow or Field Sparrow. Not to mention raptors and other things that
fly overhead; I've only had Red-tailed had Broad-winged Hawk today.
Anyway, this is certainly my highest species total at Monkey Run. It
is very enjoyable to walk around a relatively small area and see how
many birds you can find. As Mark Chao has explained to me, you find
more and more every time you go out on the trails even if you are
covering the same trails you covered 30 minutes ago.

Hopefully the rain will stop by about 6 or so (or at least not be
quite so heavy as now). Bird activity was very good through about
1:00pm.

The totals below are the highest number of individuals I saw on any
one of my several (5) eBird entries for the day.

Canada Goose - Branta canadensis10
Mallard - Anas platyrhynchos2
Common Merganser - Mergus merganser 1
Ruffed Grouse - Bonasa umbellus 2
Wild Turkey - Meleagris gallopavo   1
Green Heron - Butorides virescens   2
Broad-winged Hawk - Buteo platypterus   1
Red-tailed Hawk - Buteo jamaicensis 1
American Coot - Fulica americana1
Killdeer - Charadrius vociferus 1
Spotted Sandpiper - Actitis macularius  2
Rock Pigeon - Columba livia 7
Mourning Dove - Zenaida macroura4
Eastern Screech-Owl - Megascops asio1
Great Horned Owl - Bubo virginianus 1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird - Archilochus colubris4
Belted Kingfisher - Megaceryle alcyon   1
Red-bellied Woodpecker - Melanerpes carolinus   5
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - Sphyrapicus varius   4
Downy Woodpecker - Picoides pubescens   6
Hairy Woodpecker - Picoides villosus2
Northern Flicker - Colaptes auratus 1
Pileated Woodpecker - Dryocopus pileatus1
Eastern Wood-Pewee - Contopus virens1
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - Empidonax flaviventris  2
Willow Flycatcher - Empidonax traillii  1
Least Flycatcher - Empidonax minimus1
Eastern Phoebe - Sayornis phoebe4
Great Crested Flycatcher - Myiarchus crinitus   4
Eastern Kingbird - Tyrannus tyrannus1
Blue-headed Vireo - Vireo solitarius2
Warbling Vireo - Vireo gilvus   2
Philadelphia Vireo - Vireo philadelphicus   1
Red-eyed Vireo - Vireo olivaceus17
Blue Jay - Cyanocitta cristata  14
American Crow - Corvus brachyrhynchos   6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - Stelgidopteryx serripennis  10
Tree Swallow - Tachycineta bicolor  6
Bank Swallow - Riparia riparia  35
Barn Swallow - Hirundo rustica  1
Black-capped Chickadee - Poecile atricapillus   19
Tufted Titmouse - Baeolophus bicolor10
Red-breasted Nuthatch - Sitta canadensis1
White-breasted Nuthatch - Sitta carolinensis2
Brown Creeper - Certhia americana   3
Carolina Wren - Thryothorus ludovicianus1
House Wren - Troglodytes aedon  9
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - Polioptila caerulea 1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - Regulus calendula1
Veery - Catharus fuscescens 9
Swainson's Thrush - Catharus ustulatus  4
Hermit Thrush - Catharus guttatus   1
Wood Thrush - Hylocichla mustelina  7
American Robin - Turdus migratorius 13
Gray Catbird - Dumetella carolinensis   33
European Starling - Sturnus vulgaris7
Cedar Waxwing - Bombycilla cedrorum 25
Blue-winged Warbler - Vermivora cyanoptera  6
Tennessee Warbler - Oreothlypis peregrina   6
Nashville Warbler - Oreothlypis ruficapilla 1
Yellow Warbler - Dendroica petechia 9
Chestnut-sided Warbler - Dendroica pensylvanica 17
Magnolia Warbler - Dendroica magnolia   11
Cape May Warbler - Dendroica tigrina1
Yellow-rumped Warbler - Dendroica coronata  5
Black-throated Green Warbler - Dendroica virens 1
Blackburnian Warbler - Dendroica fusca  5
Pine Warbler - Dendroica pinus  11
Bay-breasted Warbler - Dendroica castanea   5
Blackpoll Warbler - Dendroica striata   1
Black-and-white Warbler - Mniotilta varia   3
American Redstart - Setophaga ruticilla 21
Ovenbird - Seiurus aurocapilla  8
Northern Waterthrush - Parkesia noveboracensis  1
Mourning Warbler - Oporornis philadelphia   1
Common Yellowthroat - Geothlypis trichas11
Hooded Warbler - Wilsonia citrina   1
Wilson's Warbler - Wilsonia pusilla 1
Canada Warbler - Wilsonia canadensis6
Eastern Towhee - Pipilo erythrophthalmus2
Chipping Sparrow - Spizella passerina   3
Savannah Sparrow - Passerculus 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Blue Grosbeaks, Candor

2011-05-14 Thread Christopher Wood
I believe this is an Indigo Bunting. This bird has a smaller bill than
a Blue Grosbeak, lacks the broad cinnamon wingbars and also lacks the
black border to the bill that Blue Grosbeak would show.

Still, Indigo Buntings are great birds. Thanks for sharing the photos.

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu



On Sat, May 14, 2011 at 10:05 AM, Mo Barger Rooster Hill Farm
m...@roosterhillfarm.com wrote:
 HI - It's been a while since I have been on this list. I just wanted to
 share with you some pictures I took of blue grosbeaks in Candor.
 http://www.flickr.com/photos/mobarger/tags/bluegrosbeak/

 They are busy eating apple blossoms, only the pink not the white kinds. :)
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[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma hybrid ducks

2011-05-09 Thread Christopher Wood
There is a Blue-winged Teal x Northern Shoveler hybrid at the
Montezuma visitor's center. Also, a Common x American Green-winged
Teal integrade. It looks like a Common Teal with a faint white stripe
down the breast. Sandhill Cranes and an assortment of ducks as well.
Cerulean Warbler singing at start of wildlife drive. Pectoral
Sandpiper, Dunlin and Semipalmated Plover are shorebird highlights on
wildlife drive.

Chris Wood
Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Monkey Run SE (Hermit Thrush, Winter Wren, Red-shouldered)

2011-01-08 Thread Christopher Wood
Location: ** Monkey Run--SE loop
Observation date: 1/8/11
Notes: The first time I have been able to do this walk this year. A
fair selection of birds including an adult RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, a
WINTER WREN and the continuing HERMIT THRUSH.  Light Snow; 19 °F (-7
°C); Humidity:   81 %; Wind Speed: Calm; Barometer:  29.39
(997.2 mb); Dewpoint:  14 °F (-10 °C); Visibility:   1.00 mi.
Number of species: 26

Mallard 5 In creek
Common Merganser 3 All female plumaged. One adult female. One
Ist-year, the other was only seen in flight.
Red-shouldered Hawk 1 **Locally rare. My first for Monkey Run
SE, and first in winter at Monkey Run. The bird at Sapsucker Woods has
been a bit hard to come by so perhaps this is the same individual.
Nice adult. Flew overhead heading west to north side of river.
Herring Gull (American) 5 Flyovers.
Great Black-backed Gull 2 Flyovers.
Rock Pigeon 1 Flyover
Mourning Dove 3
Red-bellied Woodpecker 5
Downy Woodpecker 3
Hairy Woodpecker 4
Blue Jay 13
American Crow 11
Black-capped Chickadee 32
Tufted Titmouse 4
Red-breasted Nuthatch 2
White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) 5
Brown Creeper 4
Winter Wren 1 **Rare in winter. In the area with many fallen
conifers on the ne side of the walk.
Hermit Thrush 1 **Rare in winter.  The same individual that
has been here since at least mid-December; near fallen bridge.
American Tree Sparrow 5
Song Sparrow 2 In tamarack bog with tree sparrows.
White-throated Sparrow 3
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 5
Northern Cardinal 9
House Finch 2
American Goldfinch 21 Mostly at our feeders.

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2(http://ebird.org)

Chris Wood
eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Possible Swanison's Thrush

2010-12-26 Thread Christopher Wood
There has been a Hermit Thrush for the past few weeks -- this bird does have
a fairly well marked face with a nice eye ring.

Chris Wood
Ithaca, NY

On Fri, Dec 24, 2010 at 12:34 PM, bob mcguire
bmcgu...@clarityconnect.comwrote:

 On a walk along the Cayuga Trail at S Monkey Run this morning I encountered
 a Hermit/Swainson's Thrush in the heavy privet between the parking area at
 the end of Monkey Run Rd and the iron bridge. It was giving the churt call
 that I associate with Hermit Thrush. It had the bold white breast spots of
 both Hermit and Swainson's. However, the throat was buffy as was the
 complete eye ring. The bird took off across the creek before I could get a
 look at the tail, back, or flanks.

 I have had Hermit Thrush in that vicinity in winters past and, given the
 lesser likelihood that a Swainson's would linger here, I am going to call it
 Hermit for now. Hopefully someone else will have a chance to see it and pick
 up more detail.

 Chris and Jessy: this is your back yard. Have you encountered a similar
 bird this week?

 Bob McGuire



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[cayugabirds-l] eBird's new Yard and Patch tools

2010-12-20 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi everyone,

As I think just about everyone on this list knows, there are a couple of
places that I really like to go birding -- Myers Point and Monkey Run
(particularly our yard). I've spent a bit of time discussing the fun of
doing repeated surveys of these locations, both in terms of finding
rarities, but more importantly to me, the fun of getting to really know a
place.

We've built a couple of new tools in eBird for keeping track of some of your
favorite places that are available under View and Explore Data. One, called
Patch Totals, allows you to bring together a series of different eBird
locations to keep track of a patch. So for Myers Point, I can include both
Myers Point and the Myers Point Marina. And for Monkey Run, I can include
the 8 different locations where I submit checklists. I can also go in and
see the latest checklist where Tim Lenz saw a new bird (either for the
current year, month or his lifetime) for Stewart Park, the Main Pool at
Montezuma or any of his other patches.

Part of the fun of this is to keep track of the birds you see from your yard
and see what others are seeing. Take a look at the link below for a handful
of people who are already playing here in Tompkins County.

http://ebird.org/ebird/site/yard?locInfo.regionType=subnational2locInfo.regionCode=US-NY-109

Hopefully others will adopt one or more local patches and see how many birds
we can find next year.

Find out more here:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/home/about/yard-patch_rules

Cheers,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] KING EIDER

2010-11-24 Thread Christopher Wood
Bob McGuire and I are looking at an adult male KING EIDER at myers
point right now. It us with a flock of mallards off the point.

Chris Wood
Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Western Red-tailed Hawk -- Ovid

2010-11-21 Thread Christopher Wood
While returning from the Rochester area today Jessie Barry, Carolyn
Sedgwick, Martjan Lammertink and I saw a dark rufous-morph juvenile Western
Red-tailed Hawk (B. j. calurus). I've only seen three others in the
Northeast. This bird was northwest of Sheldrake point on CR 138. The exact
location is mapped with the photo on the link below.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinicola/5196452367/

Cheers,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
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[cayugabirds-l] Tundra Swans

2010-11-20 Thread Christopher Wood
There are eight adult Tundra Swans at Dryden Lake right now.

Chris Wood
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[cayugabirds-l] White-winged Crossbill

2010-11-18 Thread Christopher Wood
This morning I had a single White-winged Crossbill flyover calling at Monkey
Run (but not from the yard).

Chris Wood

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[cayugabirds-l] Eared Grebe -- Stewart Park

2010-10-17 Thread Christopher Wood
Benjamin Freeman saw an Eared Grebe yesterday at Stewart Park. It was ca. 30
feet away from shore, near the small dock in the middle of Stewart Park,
swimming near three Redhead and bunches of Mallards.

Chris Wood

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[cayugabirds-l] Peregrine photos from Myers

2010-10-09 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi all,

Last Thursday there was a dark juvenile Peregrine Falcon at Myers that
caught, killed, and flew away with a Ring-billed Gull. This was probably the
darkest Peregrine I have seen in the east. I posted a couple photos at the
link below. If you like gulls as much as Tom Johnson, you may not want to
look.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinicola/

Chris Wood

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[cayugabirds-l] Hog hole

2010-10-07 Thread Christopher Wood
Hog hole is quite birdy right now with several uncommon or late birds
including Black-billed Cuckoo(!), Nelson's Sparrow, Bay-breasted and
Orange-crowned Warblers. Most birds along lake edge or in goldenrod
patch just south of lake. I also flushed an interesting bird that
looked chatlike here but never heard it or saw it well.

Chris Wood
Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Vesper Sparrow at Sapsucker Woods

2010-10-04 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi all,

I saw a Vesper Sparrow below the feeders on the north side of the Lab
of Ornithology. This is only the second Vesper Sparrow that I have
seen from my office window (or the Lab in general). The other was 20
October 2006. There were also six White-crowned Sparrows.

Chris Wood

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] English sighting of YBFC (OOB)

2010-09-27 Thread Christopher Wood
I believe that this is an Alder Flycatcher. I suppose there is a very slim
chance it could be an eastern Willow Flycatcher, but the eyering, crown
color, contrasty throat, primary projection, bright green back all indicate
Alder (as well as migration timing and distance).

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
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On Mon, Sep 27, 2010 at 11:34 AM, Asher Hockett veery...@gmail.com wrote:

 (Really) Out of basin: Passed onto me this morning:

 http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/top-stories/2010/09/27/hundreds-of-birdwatchers-flock-to-the-norfolk-coast-to-see-rare-yellow-bellied-flycatcher-115875-22590261/
 --
 asher



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[cayugabirds-l] Blue Jay flight at Myers Point

2010-09-22 Thread Christopher Wood
There was a major push of Blue Jays today at Myers Point. In two hours I
counted 2486 Blue Jays heading south, including 803 during one fifteen
minute stretch. Myers seems to be a reasonably good locale to watch jay
migration in fall since they don't like to cross water and they seem to
bunch up along the shoreline as they head south.

There was also a single flyby Sanderling, and three flyover pipits.

Chris Wood

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[cayugabirds-l] Myers Point -- Northern Pintail Blue Jays

2010-09-16 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi all,

This morning was fairly quiet at Myers with few shorebirds (1 Killdeer). The
biggest highlight was a flock of 23 NORTHERN PINTAIL heading southeast over
the lake. There was also a fairly steady push of Blue Jays, mostly small
flocks totaling about 70 birds for the morning. The number of gulls has gone
down since Saturday when there was an amazing push of over 7200 Ring-billed
Gulls (99.9% of which left the lake heading east).

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
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[cayugabirds-l] Myers -- flyover Dickcissel

2010-09-14 Thread Christopher Wood
While doing my usual two hour survey at Myers this morning I had a single
flyover DICKCISSEL that was flying to the east. This was my first diurnal
flyover Dickcissel that I have heard/seen in the Cayuga Lake Basin. There
wasn't too much else of note other than a juvenile SEMIPALMATED PLOVER on
the point from sunrise until 7:05am.

Good birding,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Little blue heron

2010-09-06 Thread Christopher Wood
Headed south over west ridge from myers. Maybe can see from hog hole?

Chris Wood
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[cayugabirds-l] Golden-winged Warbler

2010-09-05 Thread Christopher Wood
I just found a Golden-winged Warbler at Monkey Run South. Park at lot
go to river and fallen bridge. Turn
Left and go to white pines along river. Bird alone but a couple Common
Yellowthroats calling in same area.

Chris Wood
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[cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Plegadis Ibis

2010-09-03 Thread Christopher Wood
I wonder if anyone has had views that allow them to identify this ibis with
certainty as a Glossy Ibis? I've talked to a dozen or so people who have
seen the bird, but none of us have been able to identify the bird beyond
that it is either a White-faced Ibis or Glossy Ibis (Plegadis sp.). If
others are able to identify the bird more certainly, many of us would be
interested in hearing how. My sense given adequate views (but not superb) is
that the pattern of the head, lores, face, legs and bill on this bird can be
shown by either species.

I think there is general sense that the bird is likely a Glossy based on
previous records, but I'm not sure there is anything about this particular
bird that eliminates White-faced Ibis.

Cheers,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Whimbrel, Black-bellied Plover at Myers

2010-08-30 Thread Christopher Wood
Greetings,

I spent a couple hours at Myers again this morning. Highlights
included fly over WHIMBREL and BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER. Both birds were
quite high and I don't think I would have seen them if they had not
been calling. In fact, I never could find the plover in the bright
blue sky even though it called several (8 - 9?) times.  From the sound
of it, the plover continued down the lake. The Whimbrel was at least
1000 feet up, circled once high up and then continued to the ESE
heading over land.

The other highlight was a couple of Red-breasted Nuthatches. Until
this fall I had not seen or heard this species form the point itself,
and I have now seen three this fall. This along with reports from Long
Island, Cape May (Tom Johnson) suggest a nice movement this year. I
also had a few Purple Finches, Cedar Waxwings and Bobolinks fly over.

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Longtailed jarger

2010-08-26 Thread Christopher Wood
Jut flew south from Myra.

Chris Wood
Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Try Stewart

2010-08-26 Thread Christopher Wood
I would go to Stewart park for jaeger. Bird not visible from myers.

Chris Wood
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[cayugabirds-l] Myers -- Baird's Upland Sandpiper

2010-08-24 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi all,

I spent a couple hours at Myers this morning and had a nice selection
of birds. None remained at the point for more than a few minutes and
most didn't even land. Highlights included a high flyover calling
Upland Sandpiper and a Baird's Sandpiper that flew down toward a group
of Least Sandpipers on the spit. Instead of landing the Leasts took
off and all departed to the southeast. There were seven Blue-winged
Teal early in the morning and two that came in about 7:30 with a
single Green-winged Teal.

There was also a nice movement of Bobolinks, with at over 300 total.
Other landbird highlights included Red-breasted Nuthatch, 8 Purple
Finches, Northern Waterthrush, Chestnut-sided Warbler and Blackpoll
Warbler.

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

Senior Leader, WINGS Birding Tours
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[cayugabirds-l] Western Sandpiper 22 Aug Montezuma--Towpath

2010-08-23 Thread Christopher Wood
Jessie Barry, Jim Barry and I decided to head up to Towpath Road at
Montezuma NWR yesterday in hopes that the rain would drop something
interesting. There was considerable change from two days earlier
(Friday) with many more Semipalmated and Stilt Sandpipers, but
otherwise species were similar to Friday with BAIRD'S, WHITE-RUMPED
and RED-NECKED PHALAROPE.

The highlight was a juvenile WESTERN SANDPIPER. Here are some notes
from my eBird submission. Probably a female based on VERY long
bill--not quite as long as Dunlin but on the long end for WESA. Shape
very similar to SESA perhaps slightly larger bodied (breasted). Most
obvious difference in structure from SESA was much longer bill with
very fine tip and appeared to droop slighly. First noted by paler head
and particularly bright and rufous edges to upper scapulars and some
mantle feathers (mantle feathers not as obviously bright). This was in
direct comparison to many SESA foraging in the same area. At least a
couple scapulars appeared to have been replaced as well as a couple
mantle feathers, each of which was grayish. The bird was fairly close
(150m) in with the closest group of peeps. It fed at the interface of
mud and water, never deeper than ca. 1 cm of water.

The refuge staff have done an amazing and commendable job of managing
the two impoundments north of Towpath Road for shorebirds this season.
These are the best conditions that I have ever seen at the refuge. I
know that I'll happily be supporting a team during the Muckrace to
show that birders are willing to donate to improve
habitat--particularly when refuge staff demonstrate their skill at
managing the refuge as they have this year (despite a chronic lack of
funding for National Wildlife Refuges). To all those at the Montezuma
NWR and the Friends of the Montezuma NWR, well done.

Thanks,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

Senior Leader, WINGS Birding Tours
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[cayugabirds-l] Monkey Run yard migrants (Cape May Warbler)

2010-08-21 Thread Christopher Wood
Hi all,

Jessie and I have had a few migrants coming through the yard today
including an adult male CAPE MAY WARBLER that spent about ten minutes
in the spruces and black cherries. We also had our first YELLOW-BILLED
CUCKOO and ALDER FLYCATCHER--this brings our yard list up to 136 for
the year (72 for the month). I suspect there are quite a few other
landbirds around today too.

Cheers,
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
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[cayugabirds-l] Lawrence's Warbler at Monkey Run, Tompkins Co.

2010-08-17 Thread Christopher Wood
Location: ** Monkey Run--SW loop
Observation date: 8/17/10
Notes: I did my usual southwestern route starting at Monkey Run Rd and
walking on the trail from the parking lot heading west, along the river,
across the field to the river then north and east back along the river. The
biggest highlight was an ADULT MALE LAWRENCE'S WARBLER, only the third that
I have ever seen. I tried to go back to take photos with Jessie, but was not
able to find the bird in the ten minutes I had before work. WEATHER: 57 -
62F. Humidity 75 - 100%. Wind SSE 2 - 7 mph.
Number of species: 53

Canada Goose 2
Common Merganser 6
Great Blue Heron 1
Green Heron 1 Surprisingly, my first for along Monkey Run. Perched
in tree alongside creek on far west side of walk.
Red-tailed Hawk 2 Calling persistently.
Killdeer 1
Spotted Sandpiper 1
Solitary Sandpiper 1 Heard calling overhead.
Ring-billed Gull 4 Flyovers.
Rock Pigeon 6
Eastern Screech-Owl 1 Giving whinny. Heard only
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 4
Belted Kingfisher 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 5
Downy Woodpecker 8
Hairy Woodpecker 4
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 2
Pileated Woodpecker 2
Eastern Wood-Pewee 3 All singing. Heard only.
Least Flycatcher 2
Eastern Phoebe 6
Red-eyed Vireo (Red-eyed) 9
Blue Jay 14
American Crow 11
Black-capped Chickadee 32
Tufted Titmouse 15
Red-breasted Nuthatch 3
White-breasted Nuthatch (Eastern) 5
Brown Creeper 5
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
Wood Thrush 3
American Robin 48
Cedar Waxwing 21
Blue-winged Warbler 3
Lawrence's Warbler (hybrid) 1 **Rare. My first in Tompkins County.
Adult male along the river ca. 200 meters west of the old fallen bridge at
Monkey Run Road. Adult male with bold black throat and auriculars
contrasting with bright yellow head and underpart. Black on throat slightly
veiled by greenish-yellow tips to black feathers. Did not see wings
particularly well, but essentially looked like BWWA. Undertail coverts
white. Back olive. Shape identical to BWWA (direct comparison).
Chestnut-sided Warbler 3
Black-throated Green Warbler 2
Blackburnian Warbler 1
American Redstart 4
Louisiana Waterthrush 1 Singing male.
Common Yellowthroat 2
Canada Warbler 1 Singing. Presumably a first-year bird based on
limited black streaks on underparts. Singing but song a bit slower than in
normal adults.
Song Sparrow 3
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 5
Scarlet Tanager 2
Northern Cardinal 6
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
Indigo Bunting 1
Bobolink 15 All flyovers. Conservative count, since most were heard
only.
Red-winged Blackbird 16 All in a single flock. Flyovers.
Baltimore Oriole 5
Purple Finch (Eastern) 3 Flyovers calling.
House Finch 1
American Goldfinch 15

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2(http://ebird.org)
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

Senior Leader, WINGS Birding Tours
http://wingsbirds.com

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[cayugabirds-l] Summer movements at Monkey Run

2010-07-28 Thread Christopher Wood
I'd like to thank Stephanie and Ken for bringing up the topic of birds
moving in summer.
Many species move in significant numbers at this time of year -- far more
than the modest level of birding activity suggests. Many of these birds are
southbound migrants (Least Flycatcher, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Yellow
Warbler) and others are likely birds moving shorter distances to molt or
gain mass prior to migration. Surprisingly little is known about these late
summer movements. For me, they have become one of the most interesting
aspects of bird distribution.

I've mentioned on cayugabirds before that I have been taking part in the
eBird Site Survey where I try to do the same counts as often as I can. This
means that I watch from my yard most mornings for thirty minutes and have
spent most evenings on the deck. I also do a couple loops through Monkey Run
at least once a week.

Here are some of the more interesting birds that Jessie and I have found at
Monkey Run doing our eBird site surveys in the last couple of weeks. The
list below includes species that we had not seen since the first week of
June (along with the first date this fall  that we detected them). This
does include a couple species that we had seen in another part of Monkey
Run, but which we are sure these are new individuals (adults only).

Hooded Merganser (13 July)
Black-billed Cuckoo (14 July)
Solitary Sandpiper (15 July)
Chimney Swift (19 July)
Least Flycatcher (18 July)
Eastern Kingbird (18 July)
Blue-headed Vireo (18 July)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (27 July)
Yellow Warbler (15 July -- date first obvious new individual arrived)
Myrtle Warbler (24 July)
Louisiana Waterthrush (15 July)
Black-throated Green Warbler (27 July)
Blackburnian Warbler (28 July)
Canada Warbler (24 July)
Eastern Towhee (28 July)
Savannah Sparrow (27 July) -- probably detection issue at an area I don't
check too often
Indigo Bunting (27 July)
Bobolink (15 July)

I also must mention the numbers of House Finches that have been flying over
each morning since about five days ago--yesterday I had a flock of nine, but
each morning there have been singles, and small flocks. Before that, we
hadn't seen or heard one in the yard since early June.

The intent here is not to point out how great Monkey Run is, but to showcase
how many interesting things we can find, literally in our own backyards by
looking closely and taking note. There are some great natural areas that
receive so little attention from the birding community -- think of all the
Finger Lakes Land Trust properties and state forests that we are blessed
with. I'm certain that eact of these would turn up equally interesting
patterns (and rarities) with a similar level of effort.

It's amazing to think what we could learn if everyone on Cayugabirds would
pick a different spot and try to walk through there once a week (or more if
you want). Then enter it in eBird, where everyone has access to the data and
where there are a variety of tools to facilitate our ability to see these
patterns, look at arrival dates and high counts--even at a very local level.

Find out more about the eBird Site Survey here:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/about/eBird_Site_Survey

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Yellow-throated Warbler -- Monkey Run South

2010-05-31 Thread Christopher Wood
Jessie and I were interrupted in our writing projects by a YELLOW-THROATED
WARBLER that was singing from the white pines over our house at 31 Monkey
Run Road. As I type the bird seems to be heading east along the old RR
grade.

I uploaded one photo here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinicola/4656035319/

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
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http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Hammond Hill -- Nice selection of warblers including Bay-breasted

2010-05-30 Thread Christopher Wood
Location: Hammond Hill SF (from parking lot up Yellow Trail 1 to Blue
Trail 1 out to road and back to parking lot)
Observation date: 5/30/10 (9:10am - 10:30am)
Notes: WEATHER: Calm, Sunny, 65. Extremely nice. Lots of warblers and
lots of bird activity in general. A great day to be out. OBSERVERS: Chris
Wood and Jessie Barry.
Number of species: 41

Ruffed Grouse 1 Heard drumming.
Turkey Vulture 3
Red-shouldered Hawk 1 **Uncommon and local in summer. Heard calling.
Gave three series of calls, each with 5 phrases.
Broad-winged Hawk 2 Both seen flying overhead. One adult. One
second-year.
Red-tailed Hawk 1  juvenile seen in flight.
Mourning Dove 1
Black-billed Cuckoo 1 Calling in distance. Heard once.
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 3
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 2
Pileated Woodpecker 2
Eastern Wood-Pewee 5
Blue-headed Vireo 2
Red-eyed Vireo (Red-eyed) 15 Exact count.
Blue Jay 5
American Crow 3
Black-capped Chickadee 5
Tufted Titmouse 1
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
Brown Creeper 1
Golden-crowned Kinglet 3
Veery 5 One singing; all others calling.
Hermit Thrush 2 One singing; one calling.
American Robin 3
Gray Catbird 2 Both singing.
Cedar Waxwing 5
Chestnut-sided Warbler 3
Magnolia Warbler 3
Black-throated Blue Warbler 4
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 1
Blackburnian Warbler 7
Bay-breasted Warbler 1 Singing male. Getting late. Just south of
where the Yellow Trail 1 comes to the T intersection.
Ovenbird 15 Exact count. All singing.
Mourning Warbler 4
Common Yellowthroat 4
Hooded Warbler 2
Canada Warbler 5 Perhaps the highlight of the morning. At one point
we were near the intersection of three different male territories. We saw
two males very close to each other and very agitated. They each had their
heads lowered, tail cocked and were singing and calling and chasing each
other. Both were stunning with extensive bold black necklaces.
Chipping Sparrow 1
Song Sparrow 2
White-throated Sparrow 1 *Uncommon here in early summer. First heard
calling (chink call) and then seen briefly. Tan individual.
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 10 All adults (at least no young of
the year).
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
Indigo Bunting 2
Bobolink 1 One in the large field about 250 meters from the parking
lot.
Brown-headed Cowbird 1
Purple Finch (Eastern) 2 Both singing.

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2(http://ebird.org)
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] MISSISSIPPI KITE, Freese Rd. 2:40pm (Tompkins Co.)

2010-05-02 Thread Christopher Wood
As you may have heard, Jessie and I observed a Mississippi Kite this
afternoon shortly after Tom Johnson and the two of us saw Black Vulture
flying overhead northeast of the Ithaca airport. Thanks to Tom Johnson and
Mark Chao for helping get the word out.



Jessie and I were headed down Hanshaw road, just north of Monkey Run (north)
when we saw the bird coming out of circle. I immediately pulled over (much
to the dismay of nearby drivers who appeared to be unaware of a vehicle’s
ability when a rare raptor is spotted). Jessie and I watched the bird cruise
west and out of sight. We quickly drove to Freese Road and pulled over near
the garden plots, where the bird circled to the south over the creek and
then continued to glide westward along the creek before dipping down below
the trees.  We continued on to various places but were unable to refind the
bird.



The kite was similar in shape to a Peregrine Falcon, but slimmer bodied and
with narrower wings and narrower tail (making it appear fairly long tailed).
The narrow tail widened slightly at the tip (unlike Peregrine). The lighting
was poor, but the bird appeared grayish overall with a much paler head. When
viewed from above as it circled against the trees at one point, the
secondaries contrasted paler than the rest of the wings and tail. This pale
area was the secondaries and not the tips to the greater secondary coverts.
We did not see any sign of rufous in the wings and did not see any barring
on the tail. This appeared to be an adult given the pattern on the
secondaries. I’m not completely familiar with how much variability exists in
the pattern on the remiges with second-cycle kites, but the extensive pale
secondaries seem to indicate an adult. The tail barring on immatures is
often difficult to detect in poor light, so not noting barring on the tail
probably doesn’t mean too much.



Hopefully the bird will float around tomorrow so that others can enjoy it.

Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Monkey Run arrivals

2010-05-01 Thread Christopher Wood
Location: ** Monkey Run--SE loop
Observation date: 5/1/10
Notes: Great conditions last night with light south winds. A large
number of arrivals at Monkey Run this morning. The biggest surprise by far
was a male GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER. WEATHER: 60F. Calm. Mostly cloudy (90%
cloud cover). OBSERVERS: Chris Wood and Jessie Barry.
Number of species: 58

Canada Goose - Branta canadensis 2
Wood Duck - Aix sponsa 3
Common Merganser - Mergus merganser 2
Ruffed Grouse - Bonasa umbellus 2
Wild Turkey - Meleagris gallopavo 2
Mourning Dove - Zenaida macroura 3
Belted Kingfisher - Megaceryle alcyon 3
Red-bellied Woodpecker - Melanerpes carolinus 3
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - Sphyrapicus varius 5
Downy Woodpecker - Picoides pubescens 4
Hairy Woodpecker - Picoides villosus 5
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) - Colaptes auratus [auratus Group] 4
Pileated Woodpecker - Dryocopus pileatus 1
Least Flycatcher - Empidonax minimus 1 Calling; giving whit notes.
FOS.
Eastern Phoebe - Sayornis phoebe 4
Blue Jay - Cyanocitta cristata 16 Included one pulse of 9 that were
high up heading north.
American Crow - Corvus brachyrhynchos 7
Tree Swallow - Tachycineta bicolor 2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow - Stelgidopteryx serripennis 1
Black-capped Chickadee - Poecile atricapillus 14
Tufted Titmouse - Baeolophus bicolor 7
Red-breasted Nuthatch - Sitta canadensis 4
White-breasted Nuthatch - Sitta carolinensis 1
Brown Creeper - Certhia americana 4
House Wren - Troglodytes aedon 10
Winter Wren (Eastern) - Troglodytes troglodytes [hiemalis Group] 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet - Regulus calendula 3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - Polioptila caerulea 2
Veery - Catharus fuscescens 1 Heard giving thick veer calls.
Hermit Thrush - Catharus guttatus 1 Singing from our yard.
American Robin - Turdus migratorius 13
Gray Catbird - Dumetella carolinensis 4
Brown Thrasher - Toxostoma rufum 1
European Starling - Sturnus vulgaris 2
Cedar Waxwing - Bombycilla cedrorum 12
Blue-winged Warbler - Vermivora pinus 4 FOS.
GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER - Vermivora chrysoptera 1 **Rare. Singing male
along the river. It soon flew far to the north into Monkey Run north. If
people are interested in looking for it, I suggest checking Monkey Run
north.
Nashville Warbler - Vermivora ruficapilla 1 Singing on far east side
of RR tracks.
Yellow Warbler - Dendroica petechia 5
Chestnut-sided Warbler - Dendroica pensylvanica 1 Singing male. FOS.
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) - Dendroica coronata coronata 9
Pine Warbler - Dendroica pinus 11
Ovenbird - Seiurus aurocapilla 9 Arrived in big numbers last night.
Common Yellowthroat - Geothlypis trichas 2
Eastern Towhee - Pipilo erythrophthalmus 8
Chipping Sparrow - Spizella passerina 10
Field Sparrow - Spizella pusilla 1
Song Sparrow - Melospiza melodia 14
White-throated Sparrow - Zonotrichia albicollis 13
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) - Junco hyemalis hyemalis/carolinensis 5
Northern Cardinal - Cardinalis cardinalis 19
Rose-breasted Grosbeak - Pheucticus ludovicianus 3
Red-winged Blackbird - Agelaius phoeniceus 12 Flyovers.
Common Grackle - Quiscalus quiscula 3 Flyovers.
Brown-headed Cowbird - Molothrus ater 9
Purple Finch (Eastern) - Carpodacus purpureus purpureus 4 Flyovers.
House Finch - Carpodacus mexicanus 1
American Goldfinch - Carduelis tristis 11

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2(http://ebird.org)
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] George Road Pond -- Horned Grebe

2010-04-07 Thread Christopher Wood
Location: George Road Pond
Observation date: 4/7/10
Notes: Viewing from the west side. WEATHER: Temp: 71F (!). Wind: SW 12
mph. Overcast. Good visibility. OBSERVERS: Chris Wood and Jessie Barry.
Number of species: 25

Canada Goose 190
Wood Duck 6
Mallard 8
Green-winged Teal (American) 15
Ring-necked Duck 51
Bufflehead 4
Hooded Merganser 1
Pied-billed Grebe 1
Horned Grebe 1 Almost entirely in breeding plumage. A stunner.
Killdeer 3
Wilson's Snipe 2
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 1
Eastern Phoebe 1
American Crow 3
Tree Swallow 8
American Robin 4
European Starling 3
Pine Warbler 1 Singing from conifers on the west side of road.
Savannah Sparrow 2
Song Sparrow 3
Northern Cardinal 1
Red-winged Blackbird 8
Eastern Meadowlark 2
Common Grackle 2
Brown-headed Cowbird 3

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2(http://ebird.org)
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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[cayugabirds-l] Monkey Run arrivals

2010-04-03 Thread Christopher Wood
Location: Monkey Run--SE loop (Monkey Run Road to river to 13 and back
along RR tracks).
Observation date: 4/3/10
Notes: A great day with many new arrivals for me. Lots of birds flying
overhead (flickers, robins, blackbirds) but mostly in singles. Highlights
included VESPER SPARROW (!!), HERMIT THRUSH, PINE WARBLER (2), EASTERN
TOWHEE and CHIPPING SPARROW. Also high counts of YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER
(7), YELLOW-SHAFTED FLICKER (14), WINTER WREN (10), SONG SPARROW (31).
Number of species: 48

Canada Goose 3 Flyovers.
Wood Duck 5
Mallard 7
Common Merganser 4
Ruffed Grouse 3 All drumming. Heard only.
Great Blue Heron 5 Flyovers. 3 and 2.
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 Adult male hunting.
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Killdeer 2
Ring-billed Gull 2 Flyovers.
Mourning Dove 3
Belted Kingfisher 3
Red-bellied Woodpecker 3
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 9 7 seen (all adult males). Others heard.
Downy Woodpecker 8 Included one high flyover presumed migrant.
Hairy Woodpecker 8
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 14 **Fairly high count for here.
Mostly flyovers of migrants. 4 calling.
Pileated Woodpecker 3
Eastern Phoebe 8
Blue Jay 14
American Crow 10
Tree Swallow 3
Black-capped Chickadee 49
Tufted Titmouse 7
Red-breasted Nuthatch 3
White-breasted Nuthatch 4
Brown Creeper 7
Winter Wren (Eastern) 10 Exact count. None singing. All but one
detected by calls.
Golden-crowned Kinglet 6
Hermit Thrush 1 Near river. Flushed from trail and gave chup notes.
American Robin 73
European Starling 9
Cedar Waxwing 70
Pine Warbler 2 Two singing males. One singing on north side of
river, the other in the pine plantation on the northwest side (but still
south of the river). First of year for me.
Eastern Towhee 1 First of year for me.
Chipping Sparrow 1 Along old RR grade. First of year for me.
Vesper Sparrow 1 **Near mega for here! This bird was with a group of
Song Sparrows along the railroad tracks. I first heard the flight call, and
then saw it perched!
Fox Sparrow (Red) 2 Both singing. Not seen.
Song Sparrow 31 Exact count.
White-throated Sparrow 4
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 12
Northern Cardinal 17
Red-winged Blackbird 12
Rusty Blackbird 1 Flyover calling.
Common Grackle 7
Brown-headed Cowbird 18
House Finch 4
American Goldfinch 7

This report was generated automatically by eBird v2(http://ebird.org)
Chris Wood

eBird  Neotropical Birds Project Leader
Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York
http://ebird.org
http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu

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