Re: [WISPA] Can you believe this?

2006-01-17 Thread David E. Smith

Charles Wu wrote:

snip
Despite working for a WISP, I can't get my company's service at my house. If
it were available here, I'd be a Speakeasy customer in no time, because
they're so friendly to the geek market.
/snip

Out of curiosity -- how does allowing connection sharing qualify as being
friendly to the geek market?


It's not so much the connection sharing as it is the other things they 
do, like static IPs and allowing end-users to run servers.


David Smith
MVN.net
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RE: [WISPA] Can you believe this?

2006-01-16 Thread Jonathan Schmidt



Well, 
Kurt, here's a piece of the "Terms of Agreement" that a RoadRunner subscriber 
contractually agrees to:

"Subscriber will not resell the Service, or any portion 
thereof, or otherwise charge others to use the Service, or any portion thereof. 
The Service is for personal use only, and Subscriber agrees not to use the 
Service for operation as an Internet Service Provider, to host web sites for 
other parties or for any other business enterprise or to connect the cable modem 
to any server or to any computer outside the Subscriber's 
premises."

. . . 
j o n a t h a n

  -Original Message-From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
  [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]On Behalf Of Kurt 
  FankhauserSent: Monday, January 16, 2006 6:28 PMTo: 
  'WISPA General List'Subject: RE: [WISPA] Can you believe 
  this?
  
  That doesnt sound 
  like a good idea, if they even do get it to work they will have a hard time 
  tracking down someone one that is spamming, making viruses, etc. Wonder what 
  those guys were smoking when they thought of that over there in mushroom 
  laboratories? 
  
  
  Kurt 
  Fankhauser
  WAVELINC
  114 
  S. Walnut St.
  Bucyrus, 
  OH 44820
  419-562-6405
  www.wavelinc.com
  
  -Original 
  Message-From: 
  [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Jonathan SchmidtSent: Monday, January 16, 2006 11:16 
  AMTo: WISPA General 
  ListSubject: [WISPA] Can you 
  believe this?
  
  
  
  


  



  
  
  
  
  
  
  January 16, 
  2006
  Sharing 
  Broadband to Increase Speed 
  
  
  By JOHN 
  MARKOFF
  
  SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 15 - Two West 
  Coast start-up companies have built new wireless technologies that take to 
  heart Benjamin Franklin's exhortation to hang together rather than hang 
  separately. 
  Both Mushroom Networks, which was 
  started at the University of California, San Diego, and WiBoost Inc., based in 
  Seattle, have built prototypes of simple wireless systems that make it 
  possible for groups of neighbors to share their D.S.L. or cable Internet 
  connections. 
  Both companies said that sharing 
  high-speed lines might enable users in small neighborhood clusters to download 
  files and Web pages up to 10 times faster. 
  The two companies, which developed 
  their technologies separately, are taking slightly different approaches. But 
  in both cases, neighbors would be able to connect relatively standard wireless 
  routers that would permit their computers to receive data in parallel from 
  multiple D.S.L. or cable network connections. The idea is similar to adding 
  lanes to a freeway to improve traffic flow.
  WiBoost, which is also the name of 
  the company's technology system, now requires an antenna mounted outside the 
  home. The company is exploring ways to license its technology to manufacturers 
  and hopes to make WiBoost devices available for $200 to $300. In flat areas 
  with minimal obstructions, the system might be able to link homes separated by 
  several miles, with do-it-yourself installation. 
  Mushroom Networks is conducting 
  trials using a device called an access point aggregator that is similar to a 
  conventional home Wi-Fi 
  router. It is intended to be used to connect homes or businesses that are 
  closer together. 
  In principle, these technologies 
  could work for a large group of neighbors, even with just a few Internet 
  access points. That capacity - which could reduce the cost of Internet access 
  considerably for its users - could, however, create substantial opposition 
  from Internet service providers. Many of them are vigilant about restricting 
  the sharing of individual network access points. 
  Both companies said they were 
  going to great lengths to assure service providers that they did not plan to 
  become bandwidth Napsters, a reference to the music file-sharing company that 
  raised havoc with the audio recording industry. 
  The idea of linking several 
  Internet data channels for greater speed is not a new one, but exploring a 
  consumer application for the technology is a fresh notion, said Rene L. Cruz, 
  a University of California computer scientist and founder of Mushroom 
  Networks.
  "We're pretty excited about the 
  concept," he said. "We're looking for validation and we're looking for market 
  demand." 
  The technology has merits, said 
  George Henny, the president of Whidbey Telecom, an independent 
  telecommunications firm based on Whidbey Island, 
  Wash.
  "There is an interesting potential 
  for this technology," he said, "and it would be fun to put it in 
  place."
  The concept is related to the 
  concept of wireless mesh networking, a technique that is used to extend Wi-Fi 
  and related wireless networking standards over large areas by relaying 
  Internet data among wireless receivers. 
  In this use, the two firms are 
  exploiting the fact that most computer ne

RE: [WISPA] Can you believe this?

2006-01-16 Thread Kurt Fankhauser









So even if they did get it to work they
cant use it without breaking their contract?





Kurt Fankhauser

WAVELINC

114 S. Walnut St.

Bucyrus, OH 44820

419-562-6405

www.wavelinc.com





-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf
Of Jonathan Schmidt
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006 2:02 PM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: RE: [WISPA] Can you
believe this?





Well, Kurt, here's a
piece of the Terms of Agreement that a RoadRunner subscriber
contractually agrees to:











Subscriber will not resell
the Service, or any portion thereof, or otherwise charge others to use the
Service, or any portion thereof. The Service is for personal use only, and
Subscriber agrees not to use the Service for operation as an Internet Service
Provider, to host web sites for other parties or for any other business
enterprise or to connect the cable modem to any server or to any computer outside the
Subscriber's premises.











. . . j o n a t h a n





-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]On Behalf
Of Kurt Fankhauser
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006
6:28 PM
To: 'WISPA General List'
Subject: RE: [WISPA] Can you
believe this?

That doesnt sound
like a good idea, if they even do get it to work they will have a hard time
tracking down someone one that is spamming, making viruses, etc. Wonder what
those guys were smoking when they thought of that over there in mushroom
laboratories? 





Kurt Fankhauser

WAVELINC

114 S. Walnut St.

Bucyrus, OH 44820

419-562-6405

www.wavelinc.com





-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf
Of Jonathan Schmidt
Sent: Monday, January 16, 2006
11:16 AM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: [WISPA] Can you believe
this?








 
  
  
  
  
  
  
 





















January 16, 2006



Sharing Broadband
to Increase Speed 





By JOHN MARKOFF







SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 15 - Two West Coast start-up
companies have built new wireless technologies that take to heart Benjamin
Franklin's exhortation to hang together rather than hang separately. 

Both Mushroom Networks, which was started at the
University of California, San Diego, and WiBoost Inc., based in Seattle, have
built prototypes of simple wireless systems that make it possible for groups of
neighbors to share their D.S.L. or cable Internet connections. 

Both companies said that sharing high-speed lines
might enable users in small neighborhood clusters to download files and Web
pages up to 10 times faster. 

The two companies, which developed their technologies
separately, are taking slightly different approaches. But in both cases,
neighbors would be able to connect relatively standard wireless routers that
would permit their computers to receive data in parallel from multiple D.S.L.
or cable network connections. The idea is similar to adding lanes to a freeway
to improve traffic flow.

WiBoost, which is also the name of the company's
technology system, now requires an antenna mounted outside the home. The
company is exploring ways to license its technology to manufacturers and hopes
to make WiBoost devices available for $200 to $300. In flat areas with minimal
obstructions, the system might be able to link homes separated by several
miles, with do-it-yourself installation. 

Mushroom Networks is conducting trials using a device
called an access point aggregator that is similar to a conventional home Wi-Fi router. It is intended to be used to connect homes or
businesses that are closer together. 

In principle, these technologies could work for a
large group of neighbors, even with just a few Internet access points. That
capacity - which could reduce the cost of Internet access considerably for its
users - could, however, create substantial opposition from Internet service
providers. Many of them are vigilant about restricting the sharing of
individual network access points. 

Both companies said they were going to great lengths
to assure service providers that they did not plan to become bandwidth
Napsters, a reference to the music file-sharing company that raised havoc with
the audio recording industry. 

The idea of linking several Internet data channels
for greater speed is not a new one, but exploring a consumer application for
the technology is a fresh notion, said Rene L. Cruz, a University of California
computer scientist and founder of Mushroom Networks.

We're pretty excited about the concept,
he said. We're looking for validation and we're looking for market
demand. 

The technology has merits, said George Henny, the
president of Whidbey Telecom, an independent telecommunications firm based on
Whidbey Island, Wash.

There is an interesting potential for this
technology, he said, and it would be fun to put it in place.

The concept is related to the concept of wireless
mesh networking, a technique that is used to extend Wi-Fi and related wireless
networking standards over large areas

RE: [WISPA] Can you believe this?

2006-01-16 Thread David E. Smith
Jonathan Schmidt wrote:

 But, yes,
 the Terms of Agreement for broadband contracts usually specify limiting
 access to the premises on the address of the contract.  Otherwise, for $50
 an apartment manager could get a router and hub and wire up the building
 and give free Internet access.

It all depends on the ISP. One of my personal favorites is Speakeasy, who
has a special program just for this.

http://www.speakeasy.net/netshare/learnmore/

It's not quite the same, but close. Basically you set up an access point
and secure it yourself, Speakeasy bills them, and give you 80% of whatever
they're billed. The end-user/el-cheapo-WISP-op selects their own price,
Speakeasy bills 'em and gives kickbacks. Basically what a lot of people
are doing anyway, I'm sure, just with more paperwork and less
TOS-violation.

As an aside, Speakeasy's TOS say you can't resell their residential
service plans, but there's no prohibition on this for business plans,
which only average an extra twenty bucks or so per month. They also give
out lots of static IPs on most of their plans, expressly permit end-users
to run most servers, and generally do all sorts of wacky stuff.

Despite working for a WISP, I can't get my company's service at my house.
If it were available here, I'd be a Speakeasy customer in no time, because
they're so friendly to the geek market.

David Smith
MVN.net
-- 
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

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RE: [WISPA] Can you believe this?

2006-01-16 Thread Charles Wu
snip
Despite working for a WISP, I can't get my company's service at my house. If
it were available here, I'd be a Speakeasy customer in no time, because
they're so friendly to the geek market.
/snip

Out of curiosity -- how does allowing connection sharing qualify as being
friendly to the geek market?

-Charles

---
WiNOG Austin, TX
March 13-15, 2006
http://www.winog.com 


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