I also remember this discussion but it was quite a while ago. I had subsequently removed greylisting as well with no noticeable increase in spam. I did add Sam's hunter_seeker script and it did make a difference. However, I haven't seen any new websites added to that blocklist so I wonder whether that is as effective as it used to be.

On 11/04/2014 02:03 PM, BC wrote:


I don't have a link to the conversation, but I literally turned off greylisting and turned on using RBLs at the same time.

On 11/4/2014 11:56 AM, Quinn Comendant wrote:
On Tue, 04 Nov 2014 08:05:22 -0700, BC wrote:
At the suggestion of others here, I turned OFF greylisting last year,
after having used it for years before that.  My spam level didn't
increase one bit.  I think the RBL sites are pretty good at
identifying spam originations, so I use thatmethod now.
Hi BC, thanks for the reply. Do you have a link to that discussion you had? I'd 
like to know how y'all value greylisting in today's internet climate.

I installed spamdyke at the same time as enabling several other spamassasin 
network rules. The result is, our users are seeing far less spam. But with all 
the changes, it's hard to say what is providing the most benefit (and what 
isn't). We were using rblsmtpd before, so the blocklists aren't a new aspect.

Perhaps I'lll leave greylisting enabled for another week, then turn it off and 
go another week and compare the metrics.

Quinn




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