On Mon, 21 Sep 2020 at 23:04, Volker Schmidt <vosc...@gmail.com> wrote:

> I think I mentioned this already in this context: in many countries you
> are not allowed to cross roads everywhere you like. In Italy, for example,
> you are by law required to use cross-walks, unless they are further than
> 200m from your actual position.
>

Depends on the jurisdiction.  In some parts of the US you must use a
designated crossing (at least in built-up areas).  In the UK you are told
"Where there is a crossing nearby, use it," but there is no definition
of "nearby."

Even so, in towns in the UK I have occasionally encountered sections of
road with a central divider and railings on that central divider making
crossing difficult but not impossible.  That's very much a rarity,
though.  So for most of the UK you can cross anywhere it seems
safe to do so (there's no definition of "safe" either).


> I know that this is very theoretical, but it could give us an idea to a
> practical solution for separately mapped foot and/or cycleways.
> 1) Map all foot/cycle crossings.
> 2) In addition map the occasional connecting driveway or side-roads to
> make reasonable foot and cycle routing possible.
>

Which might work well enough in your country but not very well in others.
In
built-up areas that is a lot of driveways.  In less built-up areas it is a
poor
approximation.  In rural areas that can leave miles between a driveway
and the next official crossing point yet people can cross anywhere
along that distance.

I don't know what the answer is, but I don't think that's it.

-- 
Paul
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