> You clearly do not understand the basics of HTTP.  Do you think that
> Twitter is going to somehow deny Firefox, IE, and other desktop
> clients from connecting to Twitter with a simple username and password
> only?
Since when do Firefox and IE use the API to communicate with Twitter?  Last
time I checked, they don't...but maybe I am just missing something.




On Tue, Oct 13, 2009 at 3:53 PM, PJB <pjbmancun...@gmail.com> wrote:

>
>
>
> On Oct 13, 12:48 pm, JDG <ghil...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > > Wrong.  Basic Authentication will obviously ALWAYS be an option for
> > > desktop clients, regardless of whether or not it is via API.
> >
> > Explain to me where it's obvious that basic auth will ALWAYS be an option
> > for desktop clients. Furthermore, please explain to me what voodoo you
> > employed while reading those statements to come to your conclusion.
>
> You clearly do not understand the basics of HTTP.  Do you think that
> Twitter is going to somehow deny Firefox, IE, and other desktop
> clients from connecting to Twitter with a simple username and password
> only?
>
> > > I see, so then sites like mapmyrun and others that, for example, tweet
> > > "Bob ran 10 miles today in 2 hours", "Bob ran 12 miles today in 1
> > > hour", and other templated text, are also in violation of the terms?
> > > Or what about hootsuite where I can queue up 100 tweets with the exact
> > > same text to fire off every hour, perhaps interspersed with a second
> > > tweet?
> >
> > Why on earth would people do that? Why on earth would you want to tweet
> the
> > exact same text once an hour for 100 consecutive hours. What benefit
> could
> > that POSSIBLY provide to the Twitter ecosystem?
>
> I am beginning to realize it is of no use arguing with you.  Obviously
> there is no benefit.  That's the point: that both the app in question
> AND those apps provide means for violating Twitter's Terms of
> Service.

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