The "non-Fourier" propagation mode I am describing as implicated in
Piantelli's Ni rod LENR only occurs in metals.  It is about 50x faster than
normal thermal propagation, but still <10x (slower than) the speed of
sound.  A useful reference to this thermal wave in metals is:

N. I. Kobasko, SH. E. Guseynov, An Explanation of the Nature of Thermal
Waves “a Poker Effect” on the Basis of Hyperbolic Heat Conductivity
Equation Analysis and Existence of Free Electrons in Metals,* Recent
Researches in Circuits and Systems* (2014), ISBN 978-1-61804-108-1, WSEAS
Press, 167-172


I don't believe it is related to the ORNL paper, but that paper has some
interesting concepts.  Having a dielectric with super high heat transfer is
a holy grail technology.  For thermoelectrics, what is needed to go along
with that is a semiconductor with almost no thermal conductivity (very high
thermal resistance) and near 0 electrical resistance.

On Sun, May 20, 2018 at 7:17 PM, JonesBeene <jone...@pacbell.net> wrote:

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> According to the ORNL paper, which may not be related to this - the
> propagation wave does not consist of conduction band electrons but
> “phasons” which is a much heavier particulate, like a phonon but also much
> faster. Wouldn’t it be interesting if potassium ferrite was such ceramic?
>
>
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> That exotica may not apply to LENR however, but if it does, there is the
> possibility of finding better results with  lattice alloy combinations (or
> more likely ceramics) which work more like the phasons in fresnoite.
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> *From: *Bob Higgins <rj.bob.higg...@gmail.com>
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> The interesting part of the phenomenon is not the speed of propagation per
> se, but what happens at the metal surface during this propagation.  I
> believe there is a conduction band electron sweep as this type of thermal
> "wave" passes through the metal grains with perhaps unusual behavior when
> these electrons are swept up to a metal grain boundary.  Also, it appears
> to be more of a wave - and in that sense it can setup up reflections and
> standing wave behavior.  Look at Krivit's photo of Piantelli's runaway
> reaction on his Ni rod.  It appears to have a standing wave effect for the
> maximum LENR action in the center of the rod.  This seems characteristic of
> a standing wave pattern.  It is possible that the LENR activity, being
> stimulated by the passage of a thermal wave, can turn the rod into an
> active medium so that a passing thermal waves can have gain and oscillation
> - almost like a laser cavity.
>
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>
> [image: cid:ii_jhfhaaou0_1637ff96e0443058]
> ​
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