In the case of Ni, there is not a significant population of P+ or D+ ions
in the lattice.  When the thermal wave sweeps through the Ni rod, the it
sweeps the electrons along like an ocean wave.  But, there are barriers -
the Ni grains.  The barriers form a boundary condition for how well, how
quickly, and how fast the electron wave is able to propagate.  The grain
boundaries cause an electron back-sloshing inside the metal grains,
stimulating a BEC-like behavior for the atoms of the metal grain - I called
this a transient BEC - and it is stimulated by the collective action of the
electrons being sloshed like a liquid.  To maximize the transient-BEC
effects, Piantelli insists that the metal grains must be "right-sized".
Piantelli believes the collective action of electron sloshing in the grain
was responsible for the ability to draw-in an H- ion from the surface into
the surface metal crystal grain.  After a sequence of steps that Piantelli
hasn't entirely worked out, the H- merges with a nearby Ni atom, ultimately
resulting in a muon-like catalyzed nuclear reaction.  I extend that by
saying that the energy from the reaction can be semi-coherently returned to
the thermal wave - enhancing its amplitude and causing it to stimulate more
reactions.  The rod is a half-wave thermal wave resonator and the addition
of the energy to the thermal wave makes it a thermal wave oscillator.

I don't believe proton or deuteron flow within the Ni lattice is part of
the thermal wave phenomenon.  These ions are simply not able to freely flow
in the Ni lattice due to their size.

This discussion is not part of my ICCF talk - just the thermal modeling.

On Sun, May 20, 2018 at 11:29 PM, Russ <russ.geo...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Conduction band moving particles that are not electrons were very clearly
> described in the work of Talbot and Scott Chubb. They focused their
> considerable genius on proton conduction which includes deuteron
> conduction. RIP Scott and Talbot, they were good companions in the study of
> cold fusion for so many years.
>
>
>
> *From:* JonesBeene <jone...@pacbell.net>
> *Sent:* Monday, May 21, 2018 2:17 AM
> *To:* vortex-l@eskimo.com
> *Subject:* RE: [Vo]:Fast company in Fresno
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> According to the ORNL paper, which may not be related to this - the
> propagation wave does not consist of conduction band electrons but
> “phasons” which is a much heavier particulate, like a phonon but also much
> faster. Wouldn’t it be interesting if potassium ferrite was such ceramic?
>
>
>
> That exotica may not apply to LENR however, but if it does, there is the
> possibility of finding better results with  lattice alloy combinations (or
> more likely ceramics) which work more like the phasons in fresnoite.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From: *Bob Higgins <rj.bob.higg...@gmail.com>
>
>
>
>
>
> The interesting part of the phenomenon is not the speed of propagation per
> se, but what happens at the metal surface during this propagation.  I
> believe there is a conduction band electron sweep as this type of thermal
> "wave" passes through the metal grains with perhaps unusual behavior when
> these electrons are swept up to a metal grain boundary.  Also, it appears
> to be more of a wave - and in that sense it can setup up reflections and
> standing wave behavior.  Look at Krivit's photo of Piantelli's runaway
> reaction on his Ni rod.  It appears to have a standing wave effect for the
> maximum LENR action in the center of the rod.  This seems characteristic of
> a standing wave pattern.  It is possible that the LENR activity, being
> stimulated by the passage of a thermal wave, can turn the rod into an
> active medium so that a passing thermal waves can have gain and oscillation
> - almost like a laser cavity.
>
>
>
> [image: cid:ii_jhfhaaou0_1637ff96e0443058]
> ​
>
>
>
>
>

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