Hello Asaf, hello Florence,

the inbalance is surely partly due to the cultural bias (both contemprary as well as historical) of our world. Across the cultures in before 18th century women found less notice in the historical documentation. As far as I know about Japanese history, this bias was less prominant in the Japanese history, this only change since the rise of the Shoguns (about 12th century). Could this be part of the reason of the ja-wp result?

If it is the case than Wikipedia and Wikidata could be a very valuable resource for cultural history researches since never before there was such a systematic gathering of so much correlated data.

Take the 20th century, would the data reflect the change (or reluctance to change) of the bias in art, politics and economy?

If yes, I think we should spread word inside of the research community because in my opinion the research community had until now still didn't pay attention to this pile of data that all the volunteers had put together and are just waiting for them to mine.

Greetings
Ting


Am 16.06.2016 um 23:14 schrieb Florence Devouard:
Hello Asaf,
Just making sure that you knew about WHGI : http://whgi.wmflabs.org/gender-by-language.html

Do you know if there are differences in analysis between the two analysis ?

I checked a few figures and it fits pretty well.

Flo


Le 16/06/16 à 21:14, Asaf Bartov a écrit :
Hullo everyone.

I was asked by a volunteer for help getting stats on the gender gap in
content on a certain Wikipedia, and came up with simple Wikidata Query
Service[1] queries that pulled the total number of articles on a given
Wikipedia about men and about women, to calculate *the proportion of
articles about women out of all articles about humans*.

Then I was curious about how that wiki compared to other wikis, so I ran
the queries on a bunch of languages, and gathered the results into a table,
here:
https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Ijon/Content_gap

(please see the *caveat* there.)

I don't have time to fully write-up everything I find interesting in those
results, but I will quickly point out the following:

1. The Nepali statistic is simply astonishing! There must be a story
there.  I'm keen on learning more about this, if anyone can shed light.

2. Evidently, ~13%-17% seems like a robust average of the proportion of
articles about women among all biographies.

3. among the top 10 largest wikis, Japanese is the least imbalanced. Good
job, Japanese Wikipedians!  I wonder if you have a good sense of what
drives this relatively better balance. (my instinctive guess is pop culture
coverage.)

4. among the top 10 largest wikis, Russian is the most imbalanced.

5. I intend to re-generate these stats every two months or so, to
eventually have some sense of trends and changes.

6. Your efforts, particularly on small-to-medium wikis, can really make a
dent in these numbers!  For example, it seems I am personally
responsible[2] for almost 1% of the coverage of women on Hebrew Wikipedia!
:)

7. I encourage you to share these numbers with your communities. Perhaps
you'd like to overtake the wiki just above yours? :)

8. I'm happy to add additional languages to the table, by request. Or you
can do it yourself, too. :)

   A.

[1] https://query.wikidata.org/
[2] Yay #100wikidays :) https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/100wikidays




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