Hi Mike again;

Agree with you that Living zen is not about acting out of that kind 
of sticky sentimentalism that blinds a person to see what is really 
there.  However, there is nothing wrong at all about being 
sentimental for as long there is awareness about it. Emotions are 
part of all us human beings.  Nothing wrong with it. When a emotion 
arise whether is positive or negative one just is aware of the 
emotion. If the emotion is negative one embraces it in the in and out 
breathing and stay with it.  One doesn't push away that emotion.  If 
the emotion is positive one also acknowledge it.

Why one shouldn't acknowledge a positive action but acknowledge a 
negative one?.  It is not a little bit discriminating?. Why do you 
feel that acknowledging a good action is a lapping in the back?. 
Ideally,  We should acknowledge everything. 

The First paragraph: 

>But great moments often catch us unaware-beautifully wrapped in what 
others
> > may consider a small one.

I wrote about it to Mac about it already.  However, in response to 
your comment about it;

You do have a point here when you say all moments just are.  At the 
same time when one talks about a great moment not necesarely is 
labelling the moment that is the way you're perceiving. We all have 
moments that mark our lives. We all have those moments of inspiration 
or on the contrary.  Acknowledging them in mindfulness free us from 
the labeling you imply.  If a moment is felt as a very important 
moment there is not much point to deny it!.   

Second paragraph:

I entirely agree with your insight here: 

"You can't do anything about how a person feels about you no matter 
what you do! All you can do is be the master of how you feel about 
them. If you believe you can do things to make a person feel a 
certain way about you then you are certainly setting yourself up for 
a disappointment and further your suffering. Remember the 'Serentity 
Prayer' to accept the things you can't change, to change the things 
you can and the wisdom to know the difference"

Third Paragraph; (I've copied everything here because I don't see 
this in the same way as you do)

 "> Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we are here we 
> might
> > aswell dance.
> 
> Again, by hoping for something in the future or for some other 
situation different to what we have now, we never truly face this 
moment and learn to accept what we have. Why should the taxi-driver 
be feeling that the old woman's life is somehow terribly sad and that 
he was her knight in shining armour? Maybe she felt she had a good, 
long life and now was her time to say goodbye to this life. Should we 
feel sorry for Muhammed Ali because he has Parkinsons disease? Or 
that that Jody is blind? How do we know that they haven't embraced 
and accepted what life has dealt them? When we become sentimental we 
tend to see the world, and the people in it, the way we think it 
should be and not how it actually is."

 Comment on Third Paragraph:

"Life may not be the party we hoped for...

It only means that life is hard which I have to agree.

...but while we are Here (not in the past, not in the future but just 
Here and NOW) we might as well dance.  The writer is cheering 
himself/herself with a quite positive thought.

Thanks for sharing.  
Mayka






--- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, mike brown <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>
> Hi Mayka,
> 
> I'm sorry, but I have to respectfully disagree. Living zen is not 
about acting from feelings of sentimentality. Sentimentality is about 
seeing the world thru' rose-coloured glasses and not how things are. 
If we do that we give things/actions/people a label or value that 
isn't real and then become attached to them. Would Buddha have ever 
left his family to end people's suffering if he had not seen thru his 
sentimental attachment to his family? 
> 
> You said the last 3 paragraphs contained the moral of Jody's story. 
Let's take a look.
> 
> >But great moments often catch us unaware-beautifully wrapped in 
what others
> > may consider a small one.
> 
> Here's the danger of sentimentality. What isn't a great moment? All 
moments just are. If we start labelling and becoming attached to 
certain moments we separate ourselves from living in this one moment 
that we have.. NOW! 
> 
> 
> > PEOPLE MAY NOT REMEMBER EXACTLY WHAT YOU DID, OR WHAT YOU SAID, 
BUT 
> THEY
> > WILL ALWAYS REMEMBER HOW YOU MADE THEM FEEL.
>   
> You can't do anything about how a person feels about you no matter 
what you do! All you can do is be the master of how you feel about 
them. If you believe you can do things to make a person feel a 
certain way about you then you are certainly setting yourself up for 
a disappointment and further your suffering. Remember the 'Serentity 
Prayer' to accept the things you can't change, to change the things 
you can and the wisdom to know the difference. 
> 
> > Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we are here we 
> might
> > aswell dance.
> 
> Again, by hoping for something in the future or for some other 
situation different to what we have now, we never truly face this 
moment and learn to accept what we have. Why should the taxi-driver 
be feeling that the old woman's life is somehow terribly sad and that 
he was her knight in shining armour? Maybe she felt she had a good, 
long life and now was her time to say goodbye to this life. Should we 
feel sorry for Muhammed Ali because he has Parkinsons disease? Or 
that that Jody is blind? How do we know that they haven't embraced 
and accepted what life has dealt them? When we become sentimental we 
tend to see the world, and the people in it, the way we think it 
should be and not how it actually is. 
> 
> Mike.
>



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