Hi Ken,

I've never called this one, but this is my take on the end effects from a
quick review (what the heck - the worst that could happen is I'm wrong!).

-Don

Notation is "DV1" (my initials, first cycle, assuming full/even sets) and
"DV2" (second cycle). If starting with a couple out, flip the cycles at
that end.
The Hobbitby Melanie Axel-Lute
Intermediate ----- Dup imp
*A1* (8)   Neighbor balance and box the gnat
DV1 => Still in same minor set, swapped place with N
DV2 => Couples out at end awaiting next move
(8)   Pull by with right hand to previous neighbor; with that one,
allemande left once around
DV1 => All have de-progressed one minor set temporarily. If kicked "out" at
the end, stay in place... don't do anything at end (or could allemande
ghost or partner 1x back to place and then wait there)
DV2 => end couples are temporarily back in the dance and participate
through the B1 first move.
*A2* (8)   Women (in new group of four) allemande right once and a half
DV1 => Gents are still on their home side, Ladies have crossed set
(8)   Partner swing
DV1 => all on Gent's home side, still de-progressed 1 minor set
*B1* (8)   Circle left 3/4 and pass through to original neighbor
DV1 => All are back at original minor set, nobody "out" now
DV2 => "out" couple is once again out, stay in place.
(8)   Swing original neighbor
DV1 => Back to standard improper home side, 1s below 2s (progressed)
*B2* (8)   Long lines forward and back
(8)   Lefthand star
DV1 => Puts end couple really "out" and they should cross over at this
point.
DV2 => "out" couple coming back into the dance for real but will be subject
to temporary ejection again (stay in place when it happens).

On Fri, Apr 6, 2018 at 5:52 PM, K Panton via Callers <
callers@lists.sharedweight.net> wrote:

> Warning: rabbit hole ahead.
>
> Colin: I read your text for your workshop. All useful stuff and you do say
> more than "treat your partner as a neighbour".
>
> Re Michael Fuerst's quote, I agree that end-effects are what they are and
> they are not (necessarily?) the point of the dance, but they sometimes must
> be dealt with head-on. Example: I have tried to make any sense of the end
> effects in the dance The Hobbit http://www.quiteapair.us/calli
> ng/acdol/dance/acd_283.html . I think it's a great dance - if you can
> avoid the ends - but I'll be [darned] if I can make it around the end
> successfully. I've tried calling it, walking thru at a callers workshop
> with several experienced dancers and none of us could make sense of the
> end-effects. We were missing some magical key to understanding (perhaps
> guarded by Smaug). "Go where you are needed" wasn't going to work. Nor were
> the other rules. Sometimes, it seems, the end-effects must be taught just
> as the dance. No easy feat.
>
>
> Colin Hume via Callers
> <https://www.mail-archive.com/search?l=callers@lists.sharedweight.net&q=from:%22Colin+Hume+via+Callers%22>
>  Thu, 05 Apr 2018 02:42:50 -0700
> <https://www.mail-archive.com/search?l=callers@lists.sharedweight.net&q=date:20180405>
>
> I'm not sure that dancing with ghosts is the best way to deal with end-effects
> - I prefer "treat your partner as a neighbour".
>
> I have a whole section of notes on End-effects at  
> https://colinhume.com/dtendeffects.htm
>
> Colin Hume
>
>
>
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