Don wrote,

<The minimum should be a wrist strap connected to the green-wire ground in your 
house.  You can use a banana plug in the round pin of an electrical receptacle, 
but before you trust it, get one of the receptacle testers and make sure that 
green wire ground is intact - some are not.>

I built a new home in 1996.  After living there a few years I noticed an 
intermittent issue with an outlet on the first floor.  Upon opening up the 
outlet box I discovered the green "safety ground" coiled up, disconnected in 
the back of the box.  I fixed that.  Then I used a receptacle tester to confirm 
the other outlets.  All the outlets but three on the first floor had the 
disconnected green wire stuffed into the back of the box.  I spent a weekend 
making them safe again.  All outlets in the rest of the house were fine.  
Hearing my experience, most people say "man I hope you gave your builder a 
piece of your mind".  I was unable to do that as he was in federal prison at 
the time... for fraud.  Every dog has his day.

Check your receptacles.  

Terry, WØFM



-----Original Message-----
From: Don Wilhelm [mailto:donw...@embarqmail.com] 
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2016 3:59 PM
To: elecraft@mailman.qth.net
Subject: Re: [Elecraft] Anti-static Pads

Hi all,

While I can state that Ron's comment about the K2 is typically true, the static 
tolerance of thru-hole ICs and transistors is lower than it was back in 1998 or 
even 2006 (OK, I picked those years as a guess).  Many DIP mounted devices are 
really SMD devices with DIP leads and can be as static sensitive as the devices 
in the K3 and KX3.
Despite the "touch grounded metal" instruction in the K2 manual, I do see some 
repairs come in with failed firmware ICs, and rarely, but not zero, some 
'normal' ICs on a new build.
My best guess is that those parts were damaged due to a static charge.
Whether the builder did not follow the "touch a metal ground" or not I cannot 
tell, all I know is that it failed.

When possible, use an anti-static mat and wrist strap when handling ICs and 
transistors, especially during periods of low humidity.  Do not work on carpet 
without them and do not wear nylon clothing - and don't shuffle your feet on 
the floor while working.
The minimum should be a wrist strap connected to the green-wire ground in your 
house.  You can use a banana plug in the round pin of an electrical receptacle, 
but before you trust it, get one of the receptacle testers and make sure that 
green wire ground is intact - some are not.


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