David Kwinter, <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>, writes:
> Assume I survive a car/plane crash which we assume could have many 
> different quantum outcomes including me (dead || alive)
>
> Since I was the same person (entire life history) up until the 
> crash/quantum 'branch' - then can't I assume that since there was at 
> least one outcome where I survived, that TO ME I will always survive 
> other such life/death branches?
>
> Furthermore if I witness a crash where someone dies can I assume that 
> the victim will survive in their own "world" so far as at least one 
> quantum branch of survivability seems possible?

You can "assume" anything you like!

Seriously, we have had extensive and occasionally acrimonious debates
on this topic in the past, without much success or resolution.  I think
that we have no good foundation for establishing the truth or falsehood
of any theory of identity in absolute terms.  Instead, these issues
must be considered matters of taste.

You can indeed choose to believe that as long as any version of yourself
continues in any universe, then you will consider yourself to still
be alive.  You could also choose the contrary, that if the total measure
(ie. probability) of your survival is extremely small, that you are dead.

Hal Finney

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