Brent ~ I follow the logic and am not arguing with it. 
 
I was wondering if there is any evidence baked into the DNA so to speak; in 
other words are there any areas of coding DNA that are known to be (or perhaps 
suspected of being)  linked to and involved with such behavioral traits as 
herding instinct etc. that have been shown to have evolved in dogs (or more 
accurately been bred into dogs by human directed breeding for desired traits). 
 
I would not be surprised at all to find that there were, and feel pretty 
certain that a delta mapping of wolf DNA and say a Sheep Collies DNA will show 
changes in the key sets of genes that would be implicated in these behaviors... 
that is if we know what they are. 
 
Mapping behaviors to genes gets tricky because things as complex as a behavior, 
such as the instinct to herd sheep, probably draws upon multiple DNA coding 
sequences located in possibly different genes even. I don't think geneticists 
really have nailed down how instincts are wired into our genetic heredity -- we 
have statistical correlations and such, but - perhaps it is my own ignorance, 
but no clear story as to how these genetically encoded behavior genes actually 
work -- end to end. 
 
While, for example some Newspaper headline may boldly state that scientists 
have found the "gene" for aggression say, a deeper read will reveal that what 
was found was some DNA that may influence whether or not an individual becomes 
aggressive, for example, but that whether they actually do or not also depends 
on a lot of other co-factors, making it hard to determine what the trigger 
chain of events and changes actually is in reality. Very often, it turns out 
there is an environmental component in how behavioral traits arise in an 
individual as well.
 
The interplay between hereditary information and the many dynamic processes at 
work in the organism at each phase: from the transcription phase that 
ultimately results in mRNA strands becoming used as a template in the ribosome 
to produce amino acid chains is still too poorly understood -- IMO -- for 
assertive statements.
 
We hypothesize the genetic component in many behaviors; have found regions of 
DNA that are implicated in controlling behavior, but the science is still 
underdeveloped, the genetic maps we have at our disposal far too course and 
incomplete and our understanding of the many dynamic processes at work still 
incomplete. 
 
But -- [laughing] -- maybe I just need to catch up... it is such a rapidly 
moving field.
 
-Chris
 

________________________________
 From: meekerdb <meeke...@verizon.net>
To: everything-list@googlegroups.com 
Sent: Monday, August 12, 2013 11:56 AM
Subject: Re: Serious proof of why the theory of evolution is wrong
  


On 8/12/2013 9:41 AM, Chris de Morsella wrote:
 
What co-evolutionary traits have been shown to have occurred in dogs and cattle 
because of their association with humans (so which are therefore part of the 
equation)?  
Dogs are just wolves that, thru (un)natural selection have evolved
    to bond with humans as with a pack.  Cattle similarly evolved to be
    docile and tolerant of humans.


 
>For example with sheep – is sheep dog behavior evolved? Or are they expressing 
>genetic potential that was already innate in their species? That would also be 
>an interesting example, if it can be shown that an evolved set of behaviors 
>(e.g. instincts) developed in those dog species that were bred for working 
>with cattle or sheep that is absent in other dog species that there are 
>epigenetic and/or DNA encoding differences that are related to and underpin 
>the behaviors and traits being observed.  
Wolves herd sheep too, so there was innate potential.  But dogs can
    also learn a lot of words.  I don't know whether wolves can or not. 
    That might be an evolved capability.

Brent

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