http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GEO_600

 

GEO600 is a Michelson interferometer. It consists of two 600 meter long arms, 
which the laser beam passes twice, so that the effective optical arm length is 
1200 m. The major optical components are located in an ultra-high vacuum 
system. The pressure is in the range of 10-8 mbar.

 

Claimed link between GEO 600 detector noise and holographic properties of 
spacetime[edit]

On January 15, 2009, it was reported in New Scientist that some yet 
unidentified noise that was present in the GEO 600 detector measurements might 
be because the instrument is sensitive to extremely small quantum fluctuations 
of space-time affecting the positions of parts of the detector.[12] This claim 
was made by Craig Hogan, a scientist from Fermilab, on the basis of his own 
theory of how such fluctuations should occur motivated by the holographic 
principle.[13]

 

The New Scientist story states that Hogan sent his prediction of "holographic 
noise" to the GEO 600 collaboration in June 2008, and subsequently received a 
plot of the excess noise which "looked exactly the same as my prediction". 
However, Hogan knew before that time that the experiment was finding excess 
noise. Hogan's article published in Physical Review D in May 2008 states: "The 
approximate agreement of predicted holographic noise with otherwise unexplained 
noise in GEO 600 motivates further study."[14] Hogan cites a 2007 talk from the 
GEO 600 collaboration which already mentions "mid-band 'mystery' noise", and 
where the noise spectra are plotted.[15] A similar remark was made ("In the 
region between 100 Hz and 500 Hz a discrepancy between the uncorrelated sum of 
all noise projections and the actual observed sensitivity is found.") in a GEO 
600 paper submitted in October 2007 and published in May 2008.[16]

 

It is also a very common occurrence for gravitational wave detectors to find 
excess noise that is subsequently eliminated. According to Karsten Danzmann, 
the GEO 600 principal investigator, "The daily business of improving the 
sensitivity of these experiments always throws up some excess noise (...). We 
work to identify its cause, get rid of it and tackle the next source of excess 
noise."[12] Additionally, some new estimates of the level of holographic noise 
in interferometry show that it must be much smaller in magnitude than was 
claimed by Hogan.[17]

 

From: everything-list@googlegroups.com 
[mailto:everything-list@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of meekerdb
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2013 6:18 PM
To: everything-list@googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: String theory and superconductors and classical liquids...

 

On 10/21/2013 5:12 PM, Chris de Morsella wrote:

"Quantum physics is almost phrased in terms of information processing it's 
suggestive that you will find information processing at the root of everything."

Vlatko Vedral, University of Oxford

 

On so many levels the universe appears to operate at a binary level (up, down, 
+/-, spin and so many other properties)


But there's nothing about information that requires it be represented in 
binary.  That's just the most efficient way found for electronic computers to 
work.  Early on there were digital computers that worked in base three.




 

One of the fundamental aspects of reality that I have been curious about -- 
since hearing about the signal picked up (in 2008) by the GEO 600 gravitational 
wave detector in Hannover, Germany that seemed to suggest that space-time is 
pixelated -- is whether reality is pixelated. Is there a smallest pixel of 
space time (or does space time have infinite room at the bottom scale) If 
reality is pixelated at this fundamental level then it seems more likely to be 
computable; however if the Hannover signal was misinterpreted and even the 
smallest imaginable chunk of space time can forever be sub-divided into smaller 
and smaller space-time locus' or regions then computability becomes harder to 
imagine. 


I'm not aware of that experiment (do you have a citation?).  But a comparison 
of gamma ray burst delays from distant events has set very low bounds, 1/525 
Planck lengths, to any discrete structure of spacetime.

arXiv:1109.5191v2

Brent






 

Given the volume of posts on this list I am sure this has been talked about 
before, after all its not new news. I am wondering if the Hannover signals (and 
the interpretation of those signals) have been reconfirmed or not. 

 

Cheers,

Chris

 

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