On Tuesday, January 15, 2019 at 12:10:23 AM UTC, Philip Thrift wrote:
>
>
>
> On Monday, January 14, 2019 at 5:52:39 PM UTC-6, agrays...@gmail.com 
> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> On Monday, January 14, 2019 at 11:41:15 PM UTC, Philip Thrift wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Monday, January 14, 2019 at 4:58:52 PM UTC-6, agrays...@gmail.com 
>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Monday, January 14, 2019 at 10:27:19 AM UTC, Philip Thrift wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> On Monday, January 14, 2019 at 2:53:53 AM UTC-6, agrays...@gmail.com 
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On Monday, January 14, 2019 at 6:12:43 AM UTC, Brent wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 1/13/2019 9:51 PM, agrays...@gmail.com wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> This means, to me, that the arbitrary phase angles have absolutely 
>>>>>>> no effect on the resultant interference pattern which is observed. But 
>>>>>>> isn't this what the phase angles are supposed to effect? AG
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> The screen pattern is determined by *relative phase angles for the 
>>>>>>> different paths that reach the same point on the screen*.  The 
>>>>>>> relative angles only depend on different path lengths, so the overall 
>>>>>>> phase 
>>>>>>> angle is irrelevant.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Brent
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> The Stackexchange links affirm the existence of interference for 
>>>>>> *relative* phase angles, but say nothing about different path 
>>>>>> lengths, which is the way I've previously thought of interference. So I 
>>>>>> remain confused on the subject of quantum interference and its relation 
>>>>>> to 
>>>>>> relative phase angles. AG
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Each path going to screen has a UCN* (unit complex number). For screen 
>>>>> locations that get their paths with UCNs that are in the same general 
>>>>> direction (as a vector in the complex plane, angle or phase), the sum of 
>>>>> those UCNs will be a complex number with a big length. For other screen 
>>>>> locations, the path UCNs when summed will cancel each other out. Hence 
>>>>> the 
>>>>> light and dark lines on the screen.
>>>>>
>>>>> * UCN: unit complex numbers [ 
>>>>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circle_group ]
>>>>>
>>>>> "In mathematics, the circle group, denoted by T, is the multiplicative 
>>>>> group of all complex numbers with absolute value 1, that is, the unit 
>>>>> circle in the complex plane or simply the unit complex numbers."
>>>>>
>>>>> - pt 
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Thanks, but I don't think you understand the issue I raised. I 
>>>> discussed two ways to apply relative phases, which results in different 
>>>> probabilities. AG 
>>>>
>>>
>>> I don't how "relative" helps with anything, but a phase is what it is:
>>>
>>> A physical basis for the phase in Feynman path integration
>>>
>>> https://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0411005
>>>
>>> - pt
>>>
>>
>> The Stackexchange links illustrate global vs relative phases. AG 
>>
>
> I don't have any more to add, but relative phases are covered in an 
> introduction to the PI.
>
> Path Integral Methods and Applications
>
> https://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0004090 
>
> These lectures are intended as an introduction to the technique of path 
> integrals and their applications in physics. 
>
> - pt
>

The inconsistency, if it exists, occurs in Wave Mechanics, not PI 
formulation. AG 

>  
>>>
>>

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