I would like to suggest David's "Beginning Scala" book. It's written
for new comer. And has lots of examples that you can play with
using Scala's REPL.

On Mon, Jul 6, 2009 at 1:22 PM, eric cs<eeri...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> David, awesome ideas you got there,thanks, about posting my
> improvements and stuff, pretty unique really and it will helps for
> future programers as well specially coming raw into Scala.
> I totally agree with you, maybe Scala is too much for a new guy who
> doesn't know some basic and advanced concepts or doesn't know how to
> put everything together?
> Totally agree there, but please tell a way, a book who will teach that
> foundation that has some examples in practice as well.
> I could install Scala do all that you mention but I don't know where
> to go from there which itens/classes/objects should I add to start
> building a app from scratch.
> I am looking for some book right now, like Code Complete 2,Clean Code:
> A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship.
> I know what a method/function is what it does, I know what a class is,
> an Interface,Object,inheritance, but I can't put everything together
> yet, I know some of the theory and concepts, I think I need a good
> book that teaches how o put everything together.
> If you guys know some...please let me know.
> What's more, after that I will need to learn why scala is so
> diferent,powerfull,improved from Java or Ruby in concepts,theory,way
> to program and do things, in case you know a book about that too would
> be awesome.
>
> Is like a person who know what a cement is, water,tools, but doesn't
> know how to construct something, with pavers some people knows what it
> is but doesn't know how to pave and how some paver patterns with help
> with that, he can just put random pavers on the ground because is
> gonna be a mess, same thing with coding I think..hehe
> Thanks.
>
> On Jul 6, 12:00 pm, Wilson MacGyver <wmacgy...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> I would echo David's comment. Scala is a powerful language with high
>> complexity budget. I think it's important to learn the fundamentals of
>> Scala first and build on top of it.
>>
>> On Mon, Jul 6, 2009 at 11:52 AM, David
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Pollak<feeder.of.the.be...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> > Eric,
>>
>> > It seems that you want to hike the Appalachain Trail at marathon speeds.
>> > I'm not sure it can be done.  It took me 18 months with Scala before I felt
>> > comfortable with it and my learning curve with new languages is pretty good
>> > (it took 2 weeks to get comfortable with Ruby and 3 months before I felt
>> > that I had mastered it.)  I do not yet consider myself a Scala guru,
>> > although I consider myself very skilled with it.
>>
>> > All of us have different learning styles, but I'm not sure that your goal 
>> > of
>> > understanding object hierarchies before sitting down to code is one that 
>> > I'd
>> > recommend.
>>
>> > I'd suggest playing with small pieces and getting them to work for you.
>> > Perhaps the following order might be a starting place:
>>
>> > Install Scala 2.7.5 and just play with the REPL (the interactive
>> > interpreter.)  This will give you a good feeling of what can be done with
>> > Scala.  See how data can be manipulated. (3 or 4 days... perhaps assisted 
>> > by
>> > Beginning Scala.)
>> > Install Maven on your machine and create the Lift hello world app:
>> >http://wiki.liftweb.net/index.php/HowTo_start_a_new_liftwebapp(1 to 2
>> > days... also use a normal text editor, not an IDE... installing IDEs can be
>> > a rats nest of problems... TextMate for the Mac is the best choice, but vi
>> > or emacs are also good if you already know them.)
>> > Run through the ToDo example in Lift (5 or 6 days)
>>
>> > By this point, you should have a bucket full of questions.  Ask them.  Ask
>> > them as your going.  Ask them when you get to breaking points.
>>
>> > As you're spending your two weeks touring through Scala and Lift, start
>> > thinking about what you want to build.  Think from the UI back (that tends
>> > to be the easiest for most people... then think about how to interact with
>> > something and then go backward from it.)  Scala allows for better
>> > "composition" of application (using smaller parts to make bigger
>> > functionality rather than thinking about gross level object abstractions).
>> > So, draw your UI on a piece of paper and then start writing down what 
>> > pieces
>> > each UI component needs.  You should be able to build a simple, piece by
>> > piece screen that does what you want it to.  Once you've got it working,
>> > think about how to combine and normalize pieces of functionality.
>>
>> > As always, we're here for you.  The Lift community will help you, but we 
>> > ask
>> > that you document your learning (perhaps via blog or wiki or Twitter) so
>> > others have the benefit of the work you've done.
>>
>> > Thanks,
>>
>> > David
>>
>> > On Mon, Jul 6, 2009 at 6:14 AM, eric cs <eeri...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> >> Guys,
>> >> Thank you very much for all your answers.
>> >> Having a community like that, I know is half way there for anyone.
>> >> I am very very very eager to learn, that's my number one priorite
>> >> right now and the e-commerce is an example to work with some real
>> >> application and apply logic and a database to learn how put the
>> >> classes together.
>> >> It's not a hobbie I found another passion in my life besides my wife,
>> >> my dog, my music and it's web programming.
>> >> I like it all since css,ajax to actionscript to back side languages
>> >> and the logic behind it.That's why I quit Civil Engineering and move
>> >> to Computer Science years ago, but some stuff happens yada,yada.yada,
>> >> here I am several years later trying to learn again.
>> >> I feel better and more prepared than before and without distractions.
>> >> I said a month but I have all the time in my hands right now so it
>> >> could be until 2010 if necessary, full time. I wish I could work doing
>> >> something like this sometime.
>> >> Before I even learn scala, I have to get the logic how to create an
>> >> app first in my head, like which items would an object and they will
>> >> related to each other then to a database,it's not about create a
>> >> simple program only,abstract,it's about how to put all little
>> >> programns together to create something, in this case could be an e-
>> >> commerce.Then I could learn the advanced concepts of Scala, functional
>> >> programming and stuff like that.
>> >> Maybe an e-commerce has a lot of logic involved is a good start to get
>> >> my head around programming web apps with that example.
>> >> I don't know if you guys understand what I meant,what I need to learn
>> >> first, but even a book that explains that would be good, I read some
>> >> books about design patterns and stuff but none of them applied in a
>> >> real application.
>> >> It's not even regular regular programming logic, I need to learn like
>> >> how a put a app in a modular way, one thing on top of eachother, I
>> >> don't know it that's the way to think about that, how classes will
>> >> interact with eachother,Interfaces.
>> >> Anyway, keep your advices coming and in case you know a book that
>> >> explains that would be awesome.
>> >> Thanks again.
>>
>> >> wat
>> >> On Jul 6, 6:01 am, Eric Bowman <ebow...@boboco.ie> wrote:
>> >> > To this I would add:
>>
>> >> > The way to learn to program, is to program.  It takes a lot of time, and
>> >> > a lot of hard work.  Reading books is good, and necessary, but it's not
>> >> > enough.
>>
>> >> > Also, Lift really uses Scala to the max, so if you only have 30 days, I
>> >> > would plan to spend the first half just becoming good at Scala.  Which
>> >> > will take longer than 15 days!
>>
>> >> > Anyhow, being a "guru" is a life ambition.  It takes time, time, time
>> >> > and more time.  All your time.  A history of "unfinished" is going to
>> >> > work against you -- this will take serious dedication and
>> >> > stick-to-it-ness.
>>
>> >> > An insightful view from Google's Director of
>> >> > Research:http://norvig.com/21-days.html
>>
>> >> > Naftoli Gugenhem wrote:
>> >> > > I would say that the main advantage knowledge of Java over a similar
>> >> > > language gives you is knowledge of the Java environment and system, 
>> >> > > but you
>> >> > > can pick that up via scala too.
>> >> > > As far as turning theory into actual programming, my personal advice
>> >> > > is to take one small sample, get it running, and then ask yourself 
>> >> > > questions
>> >> > > like "Why does it do this?" and "What if I change this." Once you 
>> >> > > have a
>> >> > > thorough understanding of how the sample accomplishes what it was 
>> >> > > supposed
>> >> > > to accomplish, and how all the parts contribute to that, repeat with 
>> >> > > another
>> >> > > one. Along the way ask yourself, "What if I want the computer to do 
>> >> > > xyz
>> >> > > (similar to sample x)?" Also, play around in the interpreter trying
>> >> > > different permutations.
>> >> > > Of course, it goes without saying to read the books and articles, not
>> >> > > to mention to ask all your questions on the scala-user list.
>> >> > > Enjoy!
>>
>> >> > > -------------------------------------
>> >> > > eric cs<eeri...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> >> > > Hi guys,
>>
>> >> > > I saw some posts on Scala website about helping newcomers and I was
>> >> > > wondering if some of you would be kind enough to help me out to start
>> >> > > with Scala/Lift.
>> >> > > My main problem is I am not a programmer yet but I really really want
>> >> > > to be, I've been studying Ruby/Rails, Php/Zend/Symfony,Mvc,Design
>> >> > > Patterns,Uml,Sql and some Java. I read some books but I don't get my
>> >> > > head to think like a programer.
>> >> > > I really like OO,Design Patterns, Uml but I don't know how to apply
>> >> > > that to a full application, how to link everything together,
>> >> > > classes,objects(books about that?Not about those items but how to put
>> >> > > everything together)...I know a lot of the theory and concepts but no
>> >> > > practice.
>> >> > > I have all july available to learn that 12 hours a day or more if
>> >> > > necessary I just need a push, someone to teach/help me out.
>> >> > > What's more, I saw a post saying that I could learn Scala from scratch
>> >> > > without learning Java, it's possible, not so much with Groovy. If it's
>> >> > > not what parts of Java do I need to know, in case some of you tell me
>> >> > > learn Java first(the easy answer).Do I need a lot of experience in
>> >> > > Java to jump in in Scala? I know it helps but I would like to finish
>> >> > > my first e-commerce in august, 100% opensource in Scala if possible.
>>
>> >> > > P.s:I did 2 years of Computer Science C++ and 2 years of Civil
>> >> > > Engineering over 12 years ago both unfinished.
>>
>> >> > --
>> >> > Eric Bowman
>> >> > Boboco Ltd
>> >> > ebow...@boboco.iehttp://www.boboco.ie/ebowman/pubkey.pgp
>> >> > +35318394189/+353872801532- Hide quoted text -
>>
>> >> > - Show quoted text -
>>
>> > --
>> > Lift, the simply functional web frameworkhttp://liftweb.net
>> > Beginning Scalahttp://www.apress.com/book/view/1430219890
>> > Follow me:http://twitter.com/dpp
>> > Git some:http://github.com/dpp
>>
>> --
>> Omnem crede diem tibi diluxisse supremum.- Hide quoted text -
>>
>> - Show quoted text -
>
> >
>



-- 
Omnem crede diem tibi diluxisse supremum.

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