I don't know much about Android, but does it have to be a VM, or could you use 
ART or an ART equivalent:
  
http://www.extremetech.com/computing/170677-android-art-google-finally-moves-to-replace-dalvik-to-boost-performance-and-battery-life
  https://source.android.com/devices/tech/dalvik/art.html

John

-----Original Message-----
From: openjfx-dev [mailto:openjfx-dev-boun...@openjdk.java.net] On Behalf Of 
Herve Girod
Sent: Monday, June 23, 2014 8:20 AM
To: Pedro Duque Vieira
Cc: OpenJFX Mailing List
Subject: Re: JavaFX at JavaOne 2014

There are no reasons that JavaFX could not work well on mobile platforms, 
providing there is a JVM. I was convinced that mobile UI toolkits were very 
specific, but it's really not the case. Android UI Toolkit has really very few 
mobile specificities for example.


2014-06-23 16:46 GMT+02:00 Pedro Duque Vieira <pedro.duquevie...@gmail.com>:

> >
> > People have tried HTML5 as a way to create apps for mobile platforms.
> Most
> > of the big names who tried this e.g. Facebook have abandoned it.
>
> They've abandoned it but not because of the reasons you imply but 
> rather due to HTML5 limitations of providing a good native experience 
> in regards to performance, fluid animations, etc.
> And also there's a reason why all of them started using HTML5 in the 
> first
> place: faster delivery time. You only need a code base and with few 
> small adjustments can deliver an app for all mobile platforms. Later 
> you can start concentrating on delivering the best experience on each 
> platform.
>
> BTW I don't think JavaFX can "fade away" given that it's starting from
> > obscurity already ;) Truth is the world lacks a convincing cross 
> > platform UI toolkit at the moment:  there's Qt, which is fine for 
> > C++ but is not
> so
> > pleasant from other languages, there's Swing, there's HTML5.
>
> JavaFX is already undoubtedly one of the best cross platform (desktop 
> cross
> platform)  UI toolkits out there.
> But that isn't enough as desktop is becoming less and less important.
>
> Thanks,
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jun 23, 2014 at 12:17 PM, Mike Hearn <m...@plan99.net> wrote:
>
> > If it is correct that JavaFX won't be supporting iOS or Android
> >> (officially), IMO JavaFX will start fading away as soon as there is 
> >> a reliable technology that can create apps for all platforms.
> >
> >
> > People have tried HTML5 as a way to create apps for mobile platforms.
> Most
> > of the big names who tried this e.g. Facebook have abandoned it.
> >
> > Personally, I don't care much about JavaFX on Android or iOS because 
> > mobile has such different UI requirements and conventions to desktop 
> > platforms. I can write a JFX GUI that looks and feels good across 
> > Mac/Win/Linux with very little platform specific code because those 
> > platforms are all quite similar and anyway, the respective 
> > developers of those platforms trained users to expect apps to not fit in 
> > perfectly.
> >
> > On mobile, things are different: you can't just use a desktop UI, 
> > you
> need
> > a totally new UI and maybe even feature set built from scratch. On
> Android
> > the UI toolkit is closely linked with the lifecycle rules. And UI's 
> > tend
> to
> > be a lot more consistent, with the worst offenders being apps that
> weren't
> > updated to the latest UI conventions yet rather than apps which 
> > simply reinvent the look and feel from scratch.
> >
> > I'd actually prefer that Oracle focuses on making a great desktop 
> > solution. Hype aside there are still many apps not appropriate for
> mobiles
> > or tablets. Then with a Java or JVM-language backend I can have just 
> > two
> UI
> > codebases, one for desktop, one for Android and that gets most mobiles.
> > Then RoboVM's Cocoa bindings can be used if need be for iOS.
> >
> > BTW I don't think JavaFX can "fade away" given that it's starting 
> > from obscurity already ;) Truth is the world lacks a convincing 
> > cross platform UI toolkit at the moment:  there's Qt, which is fine 
> > for C++ but is not
> so
> > pleasant from other languages, there's Swing, there's HTML5. Both 
> > Swing
> and
> > Qt have a reputation for making ugly GUI's. That may or may not be
> deserved
> > these days, but people remember the history. Plus deployment is horrible.
> > That leaves HTML5, which despite its manifest limitations at least 
> > can be made to easily look good via CSS, follow modern fashions, 
> > work on everyone's computers and people don't have to download an 
> > extra app runtime. So for many apps it's appropriate especially when 
> > the bulk of
> the
> > app logic runs on a server.
> >
> > JavaFX 8, at least based on my experience so far, can be used to 
> > make attractive and web-style UIs, thus matching the first of 
> > HTML5's capabilities, plus it has the benefit of actually being 
> > designed, unlike HTML which just evolved. This leaves deployment as the 
> > primary problem.
> For
> > this reason Danno is my current fav member of the JavaFX team :) 
> > Nothing personal guys, I just see cross-platform deployment of 
> > *reasonable
> sized* apps
> > to be the biggest competitive weakness right now.
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Pedro Duque Vieira
>

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