> > On Mon, Jul 8, 2019 Hans Dybkjaer, > h...@papirfoldning.dk> wrote:
> When I fold corner to corner I make a diagonal fold and I have created a
diagonal crease. When instructing I can tell them to fold corners to
corners, or to make the diagonals.
When I fold side to side I make a book fold and I have created a ... what?
When instructing I can tell them to fold sides to sides, or to make the ...
what?  Certainly not the books :-)

Hello Hans,
I would simply say that, in parallel with the diagonal term, when you fold
side to side, you mark the median fold, and you have created a median
crease on the median line. Geometry terms apply to every crease, I think.
Maybe you can even say middle line/fold/crease.
(-:
hth ,
and thanks for the vocabulary in Danish
Claire

On Wed, Jul 10, 2019 at 2:00 PM Mary E. Palmeri <m.e.palm...@gmail.com>
wrote:

> On Mon, Jul 8, 2019 at 11:53 AM Chila Caldera <chilag...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > On Mon, Jul 8, 2019 Hans Dybkjaer, Papirfoldning.dk <
> > h...@papirfoldning.dk>
> > wrote:
> > > When I fold corner to corner I make a diagonal fold and I have created
> a
> > diagonal crease. When instructing I can tell them to fold corners to
> > corners, or to make the diagonals.
> > > When I fold side to side I make a book fold and I have created a ...
> > what? When instructing I can tell them to fold sides to sides, or to make
> > the ... what?  Certainly not the books :-)
> >
> > ////////////////
> > >  Hello, Hans!  When I teach my classes at my local library, I use the
> > following terminology:
> > >  1)  Two Diagonal Folds results in an "X" on the opened-up square.
> > >  2)  Two Book Folds results in a Cross on the opened-up square.
> >
> Hi Hans and Chila,
> I follow much the same procedures and language as Chila when I teach.
> Diagonal folds make an "X" and book folds make a "+" ('cross')... I find
> those are the clearest ways to explain the results of the two types of
> folds.
> Mary Ellen
>

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