> But there is a better way; once one understands why a no-connection error
> is being found -- the most obvious and common is that the pin is
> intentionally unconnected -- one should put a No-ERC directive on top of
> the error marker; you will never again have to see that error. In fact,
> it's good practice to place the directive when you are wiring the
schematic
> as a flag that the pin is deliberately NC.

Yep, I second that motion.  Putting a no-erc directive on an usused pin is a
reminder to me that I have thought about that pin and decided it should be
unconnected.  Otherwise, how do you know that you've gotten around to
thinking about that pin?  It's easy to forget pin assignments in the age of
super-mega-pin chips!

Another thing I do is make ALL pins visible - even power and no connect
pins.  This is important because modern chips have so many screwy voltage
requirements (+1.8, +2.5, +3.3, low-voltage-of-the-week, etc.) and different
grounds (analog gnd, digital gnd, etc.) that you can't leave that up to the
old-time hidden-power-pins-automatically-connect-to-power-ports-and-nets
game.  Funny how those nifty old automation features get obsoleted by
complex technology!

Best regards,
Ivan Baggett
Bagotronix Inc.
website:  www.bagotronix.com

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