Also note,

while your computer might have 4 cores running at 2.5Ghz the hardware I'm
talking about
has 1 core, runs at 100Mhz and that's it... processing XML on devices like
that... a real pain in the ...

But I have to admit, when I write computer to computer software, I go REST
or SOAP all the way

On Sat, Jul 24, 2010 at 1:40 AM, Timothy Parez <timothypa...@gmail.com>wrote:

> Hi,
>
> The reason we use it is because we don't just develop software but also
> hardware solutions.
> Hardware solutions which are connected through GPRS or even RS232
> connections.
>
> GPRS is slow and in most cases you pay for the amount of data your send,
> so we have to keep the packages as small as  possible.
>
> RS232 doesn't work well with large packets, so again size is very
> important.
>
> Web Services, REST, SOAP, ... they are all very verbose... to
> expensive/large for our needs.
>
>
> If you need data to be as small as possible, protocol buffers are a good
> option.
>
> Timothy
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 21, 2010 at 12:57 PM, Tim Acheson <tim.ache...@gmail.com>wrote:
>
>> I generally create web services using WCF or ASP.NET MVC. I don't get
>> the point of "Protocol Buffers". Am I missing something?
>>
>> Out of the box, WCF web services and ASP.NET MVC actions serialise my
>> objects to JSON or XML, using the serialisation libraries provided by
>> the framework. I don't need to do anything to achieve "encoding
>> structured data in an efficient yet extensible format" -- I just
>> define my objects as normal and the .NET framework does everything for
>> me.
>>
>> I don't need to write any code to do the serialisation, either. I just
>> define the return type of the web method in my WCF project, or define
>> an ASP.NET MVC Action that returns the object. The framework does the
>> rest.
>>
>> Also, I rarely come accross a web service that returns anything other
>> than strings, 32-bit integers and booleans. If I did, I'd probably
>> question the architecture.
>>
>> Perhaps somebody could explain why I would want or need to use
>> Protocol Buffers?
>>
>> Thanks! :)
>>
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