I have a question about the 1.6 inheritance model.

What exactly is the "$super" argument and why does it always have the
dollar sign in front of it?

Is the super a reference to the super class's prototype object or is
it an instance of the super?



Cheers,
         Matt



On Sep 28, 11:24 am, "Nicolás Sanguinetti" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> I'm not gonna say to you that if you have something complex calling
> "destructors" isn't correct. I'm just gonna argue against it being in
> core, as IMHO it's something that not really many people need, and,
> since you have to call it manually, the best you can do is defining a
> naming convention, not a behavior.
>
> So.... do it if you want it, I'm not one to tell you what methods you
> can or cannot call on your projects :)
>
> Best,
> -Nicolas
>
> On 9/28/07, Ryan Gahl <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>
> > Alex, javascript has its own garbage collector, sure... but firstly, it's
> > not a consistent implementation across browsers. This is an ancient problem
> > as far as Ajax development goes. Secondly, the apps I develop (and more
> > people are starting to get into) are highly complex, long running single
> > page apps (major applications running in a browser, not "enhanced"
> > websites), with widgets coming in and out of existence as the user interacts
> > and moves through the flow of the app. The dispose methods handle 1)
> > removing dom event handlers from dom elements before they are removed from
> > the dom, therefore removing that as a memory leak path (which is a very well
> > documented path, look it up), 2) destroying children widgets it may have
> > created during its lifetime, unregistering things like Draggables,
> > Sortables, etc... 3) any other actions required during the dispose cycle,
> > like persisting or hydrating state in cases where it's important.
>
> > Your trying to tell someone that's been doing Ajax development for 3+ years
> > that he doesn't know what he's talking about... simma down, nah!
>
> > On 9/28/07, Alex Arnell <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>
> > > On Sep 24, 1:16 pm, "Les Szklanny" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> > > > Yes, the destructor needs to be called manually, but calling it
> > > > eliminates possible memory leaks.
>
> > > > See below a destructor for the marker (pin) object that you see on a
> > > > map.  This destructor also destroys the events object, which is a
> > > > property of marker.
>
> > > You guys are taking this way way too far.  Javascript is a language in
> > > of itself.  It has it's own rules and ways of doing things.  The core
> > > team has merely added a more convenient way to do OO operations.  They
> > > aren't re-inventing the wheel, or doing anything that wasn't already
> > > possible with the language.
>
> > > Secondly, javascript uses automatic garbage collection. There is no
> > > need to create destructor methods, the javascript engine will clean up
> > > un-referable objects at some future time.  Granted, there are a few
> > > caveats especially when dealing with Closures but those are all things
> > > that documented and things that are common to other languages that use
> > > automatic garbage collection.
>
> > > Have a look here if you don't believe me.
> >http://jibbering.com/faq/faq_notes/closures.html#clAtGb
>
> > --
> > Ryan Gahl
> > Manager, Senior Software Engineer
> > Nth Penguin, LLC
> >http://www.nthpenguin.com
> > --
> > Architect
> > WebWidgetry.com / MashupStudio.com
> > Future Home of the World's First Complete Web Platform
> > --
> > Inquire: 1-262-951-6727
> > Blog:http://www.someElement.com
> > LinkedIn Profile:http://www.linkedin.com/in/ryangahl


--~--~---------~--~----~------------~-------~--~----~
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Prototype: Core" group.
To post to this group, send email to prototype-core@googlegroups.com
To unsubscribe from this group, send email to [EMAIL PROTECTED]
For more options, visit this group at 
http://groups.google.com/group/prototype-core?hl=en
-~----------~----~----~----~------~----~------~--~---

Reply via email to