One example where it would be useful:

I'm trying to troubleshoot a problem with a currently authorized user.  The
same token and secret are pulled from Twitter each time during the oAuth
process, but any calls to the Twitter API respond with "unauthorized."

I asked the user to revoke access to my app so that she can start with a
fresh token.  It would have been better if I could have revoked the access
for her.  I'd then be able to simply ask her to login to the app again.



On Wed, Apr 21, 2010 at 1:55 PM, Dean Collins <d...@cognation.net> wrote:

>   On Wed, Apr 21, 2010 at 13:32, Caliban Darklock <cdarkl...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> It may seem stupid to revoke the access, but in a tiny minority of
> cases it may be clever, and for that reason alone you may want to
> consider including it.
>
>
> And what are those cases? If I was Twitter I would not provide such a case
> until some of those cases where presented.
>
>
>
> Abraham
>
>  ------------------------------
>
>
>
>
>
> You already got provided those exaples you chose to steam roller over them.
>
>
>
> Basically same response when I said why restrict client apps runnign on
> desktops to oath if basic auth does the job and as a desktop client doesn’t
> have the issues of web apps.
>
> Parroting the pr spin doesn’t solve the problem.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Cheers,
>
> Dean
>
>
>
>
>


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