Hi Robin,  Thanks for taking the time to read it and comment.  I can reply
on a few ...

On Wed, Oct 18, 2017 at 1:27 PM, <mix...@bigpond.com> wrote:

> In reply to  Bob Higgins's message of Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:51:30 -0600:
> Hi,
> [snip]
> >   - Epos are a spinor solution, and apparently the electron and positron
> >   are found to be different “phases” of the same elementary particle –
> the
> >   electron.
> >
> >
> >   - During the spinor orbiting of the electron and positron, the phase of
> >   each particle changes – the electron becomes a positron and at the same
> >   time the positron becomes an electron.  The result of this “switching
> >   phase” is that the epo can present a DC dipole electric field.
>
> No phase change is needed for this. A positron and an electron in close
> proximity already comprise a dipole.
>
Well, an epo is an orbiting pair - orbiting around their barycenter.  So,
it only appears as a dipole because of discretized time.  According to
Hotson, the discretized time causes the electron and positron positions to
blink back and forth between being a particle and a wave.  In particle
space, it orbiting pair appears like a polarizable dipole.  He says that
when they are waves they can pass through each other which implies
counter-rotation.

>
> >The
> >   phase where this switch occurs can be changed causing the dipole to
> point
> >   in any direction for an individual epo.
> >
> >
> >   - Since the electron and positron are orbiting, the pair produces a
> >   magnetic dipole.
>
> I think this is wrong. To be orbiting one another, they must either both be
> moving clockwise, or both anti-clockwise, in both cases they create no net
> magnetic field at a distance, sine they have opposite electric charges.
>

I will have to study Hotson's argument for this, but he implies that they
are counter-rotating.  Thus, they will produce a dipole magnetic field.  It
is somewhat difficult to follow the argument, because part of it is the
spinor solution of the Dirac equation.

>
> >This is the fundamental magnetic dipole.  There is no
> >   such thing as a magnetic monopole.  The fundamental particle is the
> >   electron and its phase shifted companion the positron which form
> epos.  Epos
> >   can only produce a magnetic dipole.
> >
> >
> >   - Like magnetized spheres, the epos will naturally form a lattice,
> >   primarily oriented by the magnetic dipoles.
>
> I think a better analogy would be an salt crystal, e.g. NaCl. bound by
> electrical forces, not magnetic.
>
> >
> >
> >   - Epos have no inertial or gravitational mass.
>
> I don't think we can conclude this. Just as a test mass in the center of
> the
> Earth would experience net zero gravitational force from the planet, so
> any mass
> in the universe would experience net zero gravitational force from the
> uniform
> epo field.
>

Hotson says that only positive energy charges have mass and the epos are
part of the negative energy sea.


> [snip]
> Regards,
>
> Robin van Spaandonk
>
> http://rvanspaa.freehostia.com/project.html
>
>

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