While on topic... I was reading on Dragonwave's group authentication.
Apparently it allows multiple to Radios to connect togeather, with Group 
authentication.
Infering that the technology could be used for PtMP installations.

What first came to mind was using unlicensed 24Ghz, to get 100-300mbps PtMP 
for connecting short proximity located Commercial buildings.

Can anyone confirm that the Dragonwave will work in PtMP.  (apposed to just 
connecting a failover radio)
If so.... How is the protocol accomplished? I thought Dragonwave was TDD 
based instead of CDMA? Is that not the case?

Obviously, beamwidth is narrow on 24Ghz (1.5 degree on a 2ft dish), but it 
would not be for very short distances, with a panel.
Again, this would be very short distances, considering the rain fade and low 
power requirements of 24Ghz.

And as well, in 23Ghz and 18Ghz, is there any rules that prevent PtMP, if it 
was a narrow beam PtMP system, (for example 3 radio system) as long as all 
three radios get considered in the Freq Coordination study?

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL & Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


----- Original Message ----- 
From: <lakel...@gbcx.net>
To: "WISPA General List" <wireless@wispa.org>
Sent: Monday, January 19, 2009 3:53 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Ceragon, Dragonwave and whatelse?


>I believe (but not sure) Ceragon was the first with a DPRM mount.
>
> But agree with everything else
>
> :-)
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: "Tom DeReggi" <wirelessn...@rapiddsl.net>
>
> Date: Mon, 19 Jan 2009 12:32:12
> To: WISPA General List<wireless@wispa.org>
> Subject: Re: [WISPA] Ceragon, Dragonwave and whatelse?
>
>
> Good advice Bob, but I'll add.... There is a purpose for each model, and 
> for
> that matter also a specific manufacturer, and all ODU is not always the 
> best
> choice.
>
> For example... Trango boasts several core benefits, for some 
> circumstances.
> Its Giga Split archetiecture allows Coax installs to extend up to 1000ft.
> (Dragonwave's Coax split Archetecture, still has limits to 150-200 feet or
> so, according to their docs.).  Trango's Apex allows optional Fiber
> termination with a very easilly accessible connectors. (Dragonwave on the
> other hand has the Fiber connectors poorly located, that require taking 
> the
> case apart in order to reach them.) Because of this, for long cable
> deployments, I prefer Trango.  Or if on short deadline, and Freq Coords 
> not
> complete, Trango equipment can be ordered in advance of completion because
> they can support more channels per ODU model. (For example, 18 and 23 Ghz
> only have one ODU Pair choice).   Its also important to note, it should 
> not
> be midunderstood the purpose of Trango Gigas's 4 ports. They are Private
> VLAN.  This is really great for when a link needs to be shared. For 
> example,
> Port 1 for the customer that paid to get the link installed. Port2 for the
> ISP's other traffic to serve other clients in the building.  This is 
> enabled
> with zero complexity, that way.  The far end switch/router equipment do 
> not
> need configuration or being the same to accommodate segregation. This is 
> not
> useful for all installs, but in some cases, this is a unique benefit.
>
> Dragonwave offers different benefits... For example... The Airpair 
> supports
> a whole wealth of different ODU Radios that can be interchanged with the
> Indoor rack unit. If one doesn't buy advanced replacement warrantees, its
> much cheaper to just order in an ODU seperately, than a Full outdoor 
> radio.
> I'd rather float $3000 to get a replacements ODU in, than $12,000 for a 
> full
> Horizon.  We'd use All ODU models where we have live backup links in 
> place,
> and can afford to wait for a Manufacturer replacement.   With that said, 
> we
> love All ODU units, it makes for a much quicker/simpler install, with Zero
> Footprint needed inside. This is great for MTU buildings, where they need 
> to
> be installed in small closets, or penthouse walls. The Dragonwaves were 
> the
> first to be able to combine radios for double the capacity, so more
> expandabilty.  Airpair offers 25% more capacity than the Trango giga, 
> where
> split archetecture is needed.  Dragonwave offers a dealer channel for 
> those
> that will benefit from it.
>
> Tom DeReggi
> RapidDSL & Wireless, Inc
> IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Bob Moldashel" <lakel...@gbcx.net>
> To: "WISPA General List" <wireless@wispa.org>
> Sent: Sunday, January 18, 2009 6:37 PM
> Subject: Re: [WISPA] Ceragon, Dragonwave and whatelse?
>
>
>> Well....a couple of notes...
>>
>> I personally would use an all ODU version because it makes servicing a
>> breeze and also swapping out a bad radio quick and simple. No guessing
>> about is it the indoor unit, is it the outdoor unit, is it the interface
>> cable???  Get an all ODU like the Dragonwave Horizon and you run CAT5
>> and you're done. If you get a cable issue you either can't log in or see
>> no handshake with your switch/router or..If one of the POE lines are bad
>> your radio will continue to reboot. Troubleshoot the radio on the ground
>> with a patch cable and you rule out your cabling system.
>>
>> Like was mentioned elsewhere here if you are concerned with theft you
>> can lock the radios in place. This can be done by putting a security
>> screw in place of the grounding screw and use a cable assembly to lock
>> it up. If the theft concern is that high you should probably consider
>> another location.
>>
>> With weather being a concern you could always install a second parallel
>> link on the same antenna using a DPRM mount. Then if one link fails the
>> other could be engaged to carry the traffic.
>>
>> I do not see this link really working (high 9's reliability) without 4'
>> antennas. That of course leads to new mounting issues.  At 6 Ghz. you
>> are looking at 6' minimum dishes.  Figure 600-800 lbs per antenna with
>> mount not to say the least about cost, shipping and installation.
>>
>> I personally like Dragonwave for 2 reasons.  1 - The service facility is
>> in this part of the hemisphere which allows me to get equipment
>> overnight in emergencies.  2 - One year advanced replacement is only
>> $500/year per radio.  Allows me to sleep easily.
>>
>> This does not mean I do not like Ceragon. They are just doing some
>> growing pains things at the moment and most of the stuff is serviced
>> overseas unless it is an interface or something simple.
>>
>> Dragonwave support is very responsive though you do have to leave your
>> name with a service and they call you back.  I have installed more than
>> 45 Dragonwave links in the past 2 years and have only had 2 failures.
>>
>> There are other options but history, price or delivery will kill them as
>> an option.
>>
>> And stay away from equipment that does switching for you. Do all your
>> control external to the radio.
>>
>> Bob
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Paolo Di Francesco wrote:
>>> Dear All,
>>>
>>> we are considering to move to licensed frequencies for back hauling and
>>> therefore some hints would be really appreciated. We are looking at 2
>>> main manufacturers (Ceragon/Dragonwave) so the problem is "which one
>>> fits better for our needs"?
>>>
>>> Just to summarize:
>>>
>>> a) links are around 20-25 miles
>>> b) antennas: the smaller the better
>>> c) robustness is very important
>>> d) average life: 3 years
>>>
>>> >From what I have read in the data sheets I have done the following
>>> considerations:
>>>
>>> 1) Dragonwave Horizon is nice but only if your site is well protected
>>> from "sabotage and stealing". The "all outdoor" approach is nice but it
>>> has the drawback that if somebody takes the whole unit they will have a
>>> brand new unit working. With the IDU/ODU approach they will have only
>>> half of the "banknote", so after the first or second time, they will not
>>> spend time having something useless.
>>> 2) Dragonwave Horizon can be a problem if you don't use fiber from the
>>> unit down to your switch. In few words, we have sites with huge amount
>>> or EM fields, so even using shielded cables (e.g. Belden 1300A) we get
>>> only few ethernet megabits. So we should use fiber to go up the tower,
>>> but maybe be IDU/ODU approach is more robust (comments welcome).
>>> 3) All outdoor means that when you have to re-use the devices somewhere
>>> else, you have to buy a whole new thing instead of just swapping the 
>>> ODU.
>>> 4) In any case the (all outdoor or IDU/ODU) when the tower is frozen
>>> (and when I mean frozen I mean a whole block of ice) then it does not
>>> change much, you have to wait the better season to work on that.
>>> 5) Performances look more or less the same.
>>> 6) I don't know much about prices, I have looked on some website, I am
>>> still exploring this aspect
>>> 7) Is anybody using the software-switch capabilities on this devices or
>>> just using them as transparent bridges for your router/switch? Do you
>>> need to reset them often?
>>>
>>> Comments are welcome.
>>>
>>> Am I missing some other good brand?
>>>
>>> Thank you.
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
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