In my opinion the Dalai Lama is needs to decide what he is.  Is he the
religious leader of the Tibetan Buddhist Church, or is he the political
leader of the Tibetan people?  I think until he decides and focuses himself
in one area or the other, he will not do well at either.  Remember the zen
saying:  'When you sit, sit.  When you walk, walk.  Above all, do not
wobble.'

 

It is the same with the Buddhist monks in Myanmar (Burma).  What are they
doing out in the streets wielding sticks, throwing bricks and inciting
fellow-citizens to riot against the government?  And if they are doing that,
how can they claim the protection and regard they are usually given in that
culture as monks?

 

In both cases, why are Buddhist monks so concerned with political issues?
What has that to do with the spiritual leadership and example they are
supposed to give?

 

There!  That ought to be good fodder for some posts.

 

.Bill! 

 

From: Cynth [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] 
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2008 6:05 AM
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Zen] Ash Wednesday

 

I think it has more to do with the current Pope being far too 
religiously conservative and not wishing to meet with leaders of other 
faith. However, if he has met with leaders from other religions 
(particularly other Buddhist disciplines), then I will have to agree 
with your perceptions.

Cynth

Jody W. Ianuzzi wrote:
> 
> 
> When the Dalai Lama visits Rome, the Pope always sees him. this past year
> the Pope would not visit with the Dalai Lama. Interesting coincidence that
> china has allowed a Catholic bishop to stay in China. I guess the Chinese
> have the Pope wrapped around their finger.
> 
> JODY
> 
> "WE MUST BE THE CHANGE WE WISH
> TO SEE IN THE WORLD" ~ Gandhi
> 
> 

 

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