Bill!,

Well, I can't speak for others, but this zen practioner finds such 
articles both 
interesting and helpful. Science helps us get down to the 'nuts and bolts' of 
how and why things are what they are. I'm not completely *all* for the 
jettisoning of the more traditional/arcane side of Zen and meditation (I also 
like the gongs and incense etc), but an understanding of what 
physically/mentally happens to us as a result of meditation weakens the grip of 
the supernatural/esoteric aspects sometimes afforded to Zen/zen. If we think, 
and appreciate, that science has helped us debunk most religious dogma and 
superstition, then I find it hypocritical to not turn the light of science on 
zen. Or perhaps we'd secretly like to keep zen "cool and mysterious"... ; )

Mike 



________________________________
From: "billsm...@hhs1963.org" <billsm...@hhs1963.org>
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sun, 24 October, 2010 10:59:24
Subject: RE: [Zen] Zen and the Brain

  
Ed,
You keep posting content such as this.  Do you think having a scientific 
explanation of how zen meditation affects the body is helpful to zen 
practitioners?
…Bill!
 
From:Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:zen_fo...@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
ED
Sent: Saturday, October 23, 2010 11:42 AM
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Zen] Zen and the Brain
 
  
 
Zen and the Brain
>From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search 
Zen and the Brain: Toward an Understanding of Meditation and Consciousness is a 
book authored by James H. Austin. First published in 1998, the book's aim is to 
establish links between the neurological workings of the human brain and 
meditation. For example Austin presents evidence from EEG scans that deep 
relaxed breathing reduces brain activity.
The publishers described their book as a "Comprehensive text on the evidence 
from neuroscience that helps to clarify which brain mechanisms underlie the 
subjective states of Zen, and employs Zen to 'illuminate' how the brain works 
in 
various states of consciousness".
Austin is an MD and has also practiced Zen over many years. Later Austin wrote 
a 
follow-up, Zen-Brain Reflections.
[edit]See also
        * Neurotheology
        * Rational mysticism
[edit]References
        * James H. Austin, Zen and the Brain: Toward an Understanding of 
Meditation and 
Consciousness. Reprint edition July 2, 1999. MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-51109-6
        * James H. Austin, Zen-Brain Reflections. First edition February 14, 
2006. MIT 
Press. ISBN 0-262-01223-5
 
[edit]External links
        * Your Brain on Religion: Mystic visions or brain circuits at work? 
(Newsweek 
article on Austin and neurotheology, May 2001)
        * Interview with the author (James H. Austin, M.D. discusses Zen and 
the Brain)
        * Excerpts from the book
 


__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature 
database 5558 (20101023) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com

__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature 
database 5558 (20101023) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com




      

Reply via email to