Sounds like 25 minutes of sitting a day is ok. Also, physically,
sitting on the zafu with legs crossed feels healthier, more active
than slouching in a office chair. It requires active balance for the
abdomen, something my office chair does not require.

Perhaps I should switch my office to be standing all day.

On Thursday, January 13, 2011, Kristy McClain <healthypl...@yahoo.com> wrote:
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> Amen.
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> Thanks for sharing this!  k
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> --- On Thu, 1/13/11, Edgar Owen <edgaro...@att.net> wrote:
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> From: Edgar Owen <edgaro...@att.net>
> Subject: [Zen] News: Can sitting too much kill you?
> To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
> Date: Thursday, January 13, 2011, 5:22 AM
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> For all you deluded ones who believe that sitting instead of daily life is 
> Zen.
> :-)
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> Edgar
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> Can sitting too much kill you?
> By Travis Saunders | Jan 6, 2011 10:39 AM
> We all know that physical activity is important for good health—regardless of 
> your age, gender or body weight, living an active lifestyle can improve your 
> quality of life and dramatically reduce your risk of death and disease. But 
> even if you are meeting current physical activity guidelines by exercising 
> for one hour per day (something few Americans manage on a consistent basis), 
> that leaves 15 to 16 hours per day when you are not being active. Does it 
> matter how you spend those hours, which account for more than 90% of your 
> day? For example, does it matter whether you spend those 16 hours sitting on 
> your butt, versus standing or walking at a leisurely pace? Fortunately or 
> unfortunately, new evidence suggests that it does matter, and in a big way.
> What is sedentary behavior?
> Before we go any further, it’s important that we define the term "sedentary 
> behavior". Sedentary behavior is typically defined as any behavior with an 
> exceedingly low energy expenditure (defined as <1.5 metabolic equivalents). 
> In general, this means that almost any time you are sitting (e.g. working on 
> a computer, watching TV, driving) or lying down, you are engaging in 
> sedentary behavior. There are a few notable exceptions when you can be 
> sitting or lying down but still expend high energy expenditure (e.g. riding a 
> stationary bike), but in general if you are sitting down, you are being 
> sedentary.
> The above definition may seem rather intuitive, but this is not the way that 
> the term sedentary has been used by exercise science researchers for the past 
> 50 years. Up until very recently, referring to someone as sedentary meant 
> simply that they were not meeting current guidelines for physical activity. 
> In simple terms, if you were exercising for 60+ minutes/day, you were 
> considered physically active. If you were exercising 10 minutes/day, you were 
> sedentary. Case closed. But as we will discuss below, sedentary time is 
> closely associated with health risk regardless of how much physical activity 
> you perform on a daily basis. Further, it is entirely possible to meet 
> current physical activity guidelines while still being incredibly sedentary. 
> Thus, to quote researcher Marc Hamilton, sitting too much is not the same as 
> exercising too little. (if you take only one thing from this post, let it be 
> that quote from Dr Hamilton).
>  Which is why it is so important that when we use the term "sedentary", we 
> are all on the same page about what that means.
> Now that we know what sedentary behavior is, let’s look at its relationship 
> with health risk.
> Epidemiological Evidence
> In 2009 Dr Peter Katzmarzyk and colleagues at the Pennington Biomedical 
> Research Center published an influential longitudinal paper examining the 
> links between time spent sitting and mortality in a sample of more than 
> 17,000 Canadians (available 
> here <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19346988?ordinalpos=2&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum>).
>  Not surprisingly, they report that time spent sitting was associated with 
> increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality (there was 
> no association between sitting and deaths due to cancer). But what is 
> fascinating is that the relationship between sitting time and mortality was 
> independent of physical activity levels. In fact, individuals who sat the 
> most were roughly 50% more likely to die during the follow-up period than 
> individuals who sat the least, even after
>  controlling for age, smoking, and physical activity levels. Further analyses 
> suggested that the relationship between sitting time and mortality was also 
> independent of body weight. This suggests that all things being equal (body 
> weight, physical activity levels, smoking, alcohol intake, age, and sex) the 
> person who sits more is at a higher risk of death than the person who sits 
> less.
> The above findings linking excessive sitting with poor health are far from 
> isolated. For example, a similar longitudinal 
> study <http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/121/3/384> from 
> Australia reports that each hour of daily television viewing (a proxy of 
> sedentary time) is associated with an 11% increase in the risk of all-cause 
> mortality regardless of age, sex, waist circumference, and physical activity 
> level. And as my colleagues and
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