I would not state that 8.8.8.8 or any of the public DNS servers out there that 
state that you can use their DNS servers are bad.  However, think of these two 
issues:


1.        What happens when that DNS server returns answers (still responds), 
just it takes 6000 ms to do so. ?  Who do you contact?

2.       If you are not paying for it, then what kind of influence can you have 
on it?   I look at Google. Is google within your circle of influence?   No?  
You can’t pick up the phone and call them, you can barely find an e-mail to 
email them?   And even if you could call them, you are not paying them 
anything, why do they care what is occurring? They don’t!

DNS is a required function to work on-line, simple as that, if its slow, etc., 
then it’s your service that’s slow not the DNS servers, hence, why you need a 
fast responding DNS server.

In this case, using your upstream and caching at the MT is most likely fine and 
if you wish to put on a full blown DNS server, then you can do so at minimal 
cost, but don’t use something that you can’t influence.  I can tell people how 
many times I have found issues with DNS that they don’t own or control; and 
have little to say about how it operates..   Its wayyy to often.


Dennis Burgess
www.linktechs.net<http://www.linktechs.net/> – 314-735-0270 x103 – 
dmburg...@linktechs.net<mailto:dmburg...@linktechs.net>

From: Af [mailto:af-boun...@afmug.com] On Behalf Of Sterling Jacobson
Sent: Monday, February 12, 2018 3:10 PM
To: af@afmug.com
Subject: Re: [AFMUG] ISP in a box

I think that was me you asked about those three items.

AND we still use 8.8.8.8 DNS resolvers.

I know, it’s bad, but one of my upstreams is directly on Google CDN so it 
‘applies’.

I do like redundancy though.

So if you use one CCR, get two of them for your project, they are relatively 
cheap.

With fiber you really don’t need the extra servers for bandwidth shaping, I 
just shape at the CPE or switch port.

So in one cabinet you put say a 144 count panel and splice on, then get a SFP 
switch and two CCR routers.
I have used the 1036 CCR in some areas to start, and a pair of those running 
VRRP between them works great.
Plug both into 10Gbps SFP+ ports on the switch/switches and you have ‘standard’ 
redundancy.

Meaning you can bring in two 10Gbps links, one to each of the CCR units, and 
have redundant SFP+ links to the switch bank as well.

They have more than enough horse power to run DHCP, NAT, DNS etc between them 
to fill the duties for the cabinet/site.

Get a UPS, I use Alpha, and four batteries on it should work well.

Cabinet can be 20AMP and run plenty of switches on that.

I also buy an AC unit and attach it to the side of the cabinet.

I put some monitoring in there on a separate managed network to keep track of 
power and heat/temp and track the switches/CPE’s etc.

That’s about it.

Rinse, repeat.






From: Af [mailto:af-boun...@afmug.com] On Behalf Of Chuck McCown
Sent: Monday, February 12, 2018 1:02 PM
To: af@afmug.com<mailto:af@afmug.com>
Subject: Re: [AFMUG] ISP in a box

Guess I don’t need DNS.  8.8.8.8 seems cheap and easy...

From: Chuck McCown
Sent: Monday, February 12, 2018 12:59 PM
To: af@afmug.com<mailto:af@afmug.com>
Subject: [AFMUG] ISP in a box

Had a subdivision developer contact me, wanting service for their hundred or so 
homes.
I can get DIA close to the area at a reasonable area.  It will require some 
build but that is OK, that is something I feel some level of expertise.

Considering a minimal NOC build.

I asked this question of someone once before and I cannot find their answer.  
Not sure if asked on the list or not.  But the answer went something like this:


  1.  Buy a big CCR.
  2.  Hire Linktechs to configure it.
  3.  Put in a big switch for the AE SFPs and rock and roll.

I am sure I would need at least one server.  DHCP, NAT, DNS?
But can all of that be provided by the CCR?

What is the smallest NOC configuration that could be created?

Batts, rectifier, cooling.

I really could put all this in a cabinet on the corner of the street.



Reply via email to