Um - what are you suggesting as an alternative?  Alright, even with a
hole drilled through it, it's still possible to get some data back -
the tinier bits you can smash your drive into, the less chance there
is of anyone getting the data back in any meaningful form.

It's more a question of "who would WANT to spend the hours putting a
drive back together just to get access to your £500 overdraft
facility" - ie a question of trouble / worth.

Me, I reformat them, smash 'em up with a lump hammer and stick 'em in
the "general metal" recycling at the local recycling centre, on the
basis that it's more trouble than it's worth to get data back, just to
get my bank details, or my Second Life password.;

Where's your problem?

R.

On Wed, Feb 25, 2009 at 5:41 PM, David Greaves <da...@dgreaves.com> wrote:
> So here we are, a month after Which? gave out the same dumb advice the BBC 
> follows:
>
>  http://news.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/hi/technology/newsid_7910000/7910045.stm
>
> Sensationalist pillock :)
>
> I can't wait for someone to be seriously hurt trying to drill through a hard 
> drive.
>
> FWIW:
>  http://16systems.com/zero/index.html
>
> David
>
> --
> "Don't worry, you'll be fine; I saw it work in a cartoon once..."
> -
> Sent via the backstage.bbc.co.uk discussion group.  To unsubscribe, please 
> visit http://backstage.bbc.co.uk/archives/2005/01/mailing_list.html.  
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