If you look at the "sliced open" Toyota FCV you will see two
Hydrogen tanks and in between a largish (slightly larger than the Prius'
hybrid) battery pack. So, one tank under the trunk and one under the
rear seat. The two front seats were directly over the fuel cell and the
front
of the vehicle had the electric drive.
As said before - when (not if) FCV fails, just rip out the tanks and
fuel cell and mount a large capacity battery and a charger. instant EV.

Note: since Hydrogen / Fuel Cell is a contentious issue, it is not
recommended to continue discussion of its merits & drawbacks, so let's
steer back the discussion to EVs.

Cor van de Water
Chief Scientist
Proxim Wireless Corporation http://www.proxim.com
Email: cwa...@proxim.com Private: http://www.cvandewater.info
Skype: cor_van_de_water Tel: +1 408 383 7626


-----Original Message-----
From: EV [mailto:ev-boun...@lists.evdl.org] On Behalf Of Peter Eckhoff
via EV
Sent: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 3:48 PM
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Hydrogen/EV thoughts

AC Propulsion had a Power Point slide where they compared the efficiency

of various "fuels".  Their standard was an EV with the equivalent of 50 
MPG.  A similar vehicle, powered by hydrogen produced from reformatted 
natural gas and fed into a fuel cell, was the equivalent of 30 mpg while

hydrogen produced by electrolysis was the equivalent of 12 mpg.

There a number of technical problems with fuel cells:
1) A fuel cell life expectancy was about 2,000 hours.  Since my average 
driving speed is 30 mpg, I would have to replace my fuel cell every 60K 
miles.  Therefore, a different fuel cell construction technique would 
have to be used.
2) A pack of battery or electrolytic capacitors or an ICE was needed to 
aid in acceleration.  Therefore, a faster way of transferring the 
"proton" through the electrolyte is needed.  Think of a proton as a 
person needed to run through air as opposed through water or molasses.
3) The storage of hydrogen to go 300 miles in a Toyota Camry needed 3 
specially carbon wound tanks where the internal pressures reached 700 
bar.  A bar is 14.7 pounds per square inch.  This equates to 5 tons per 
square inch in a "2 ton" vehicle.  Catastrophic failures would be 
catastrophic.  The hydrogen, therefore, needs to be stored in a 
molecular sponge where the hydrogen freely flows in and out of storage 
without much energy inducements.  One real scheme required 800 degree 
Fahrenheit temperatures to release the hydrogen from storage.

Given the number of technical problems that need to be solved, I don't 
see hydrogen fuel celled vehicles coming into common use anytime soon.


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