Bruno, just to take off some mal-deserved feathers:
I think Theaetetus has two different 'e' sounds one after the other (anybody
can pronounce him better?) and in Hungarian we have them (' e ' like in
'have' and e' like in 'take') with a 3rd variation where the accent is not
applied: a closed and an open ' e ' sound (instrumental in dialects). So I
have no problem to pronounce the discussing gentleman as The'-etetus. Maybe
he called himself (?) Te-aythetos? Ask Plato you are close to him.

(And I always proudly thought that Hungarian - vs. English - has a simple
vowel-code in an unchanging uniform pronunciation...).
German proverb: "Fremdworter sind glucksache" (= foreign words are a matter
of luck). A friend added: you can NEVER know what they mean.

John
On Tue, Aug 4, 2009 at 11:06 AM, Bruno Marchal <marc...@ulb.ac.be> wrote:

>  John,
>
> Thanks for those informations. I thought that the "æ" was just a french,
> if not an old french, usage.
> Note that when I wrote "Theatetus", it is just a mispelling. I tend to
> forget that second "e", but your remark will help me to remind it. Note that
> Miles Burnyeat, in his book " The Theaetetus of Plato, and Levett in his
> traduction wrote simply "Theaetetus". But in french too, more and more
> people forget to attach the "o" and "e" in words like oeuvre, or soeur
> (sister).
>
> Bruno
>
>  On 04 Aug 2009, at 15:05, John Mikes wrote:
>
>  Bruno and Mirek,
>  concerning Theateticus vs. Theaeteticus:
>  in my strange linguistic background I make a difference betwee ai and ae -
> the spelling in Greek and Latin of the name. As far as I know, nobody knows
> for sure how did the 'ancient' Greeks pronounce their ai - maybe as the flat
> 'e' like in German "lehr" while the 'e' pronounciation might have been
> clsoer to (between) 'make' and 'peck' - the reason why the Romans
> transcribed it by their *ONE letter* *"ae",* (lehr) and not as English
> would read: *'a'+'ee'*. The spelling you gave points to this latter. The
> Latin 'ae' is not TWO separate letters (a+e), it is a twin, as marked in the
> Wiki article
> ..."*Theætetus"... **and not Theaetetus *
> which looked strange to me from the beginning  .
> *(I wonder if the e-mail reproduces the (ae) one sign? look up in Wiki's
> Theaetetus Dialogue (in the title with the wrong spelling) the 1st line
> brings the merged-together double 'æ'.) *
> ***
> *English spelling always does a job on classical words, the Greek 'oi' has
> been transcribed into Latin sometimes as 'oe' and pronounced as in "girl"
> (oeuvre) while many think it was a sound like what the pigs say: as "oy".
> then comes America, with it's Phoenix (pron: feenix).... *
> I don't think the Romans were much better off, centuries after and a world
> apart from the ancient (classical for them) Greeks.
> And who knows today if the great orator was Tzitzero or Kikero to turn
> later into Tchitchero?
> ***
> *"The Old Man" did quite a job on us at the tower of Babel. *
> ***
> *[[ - I am enjoying your 'other' post where you spelled out my own
> vocabulary as indeed thinking functions as relations, lately not as a static
> description, but also the interchanging factor - ]]*
> **
> *John*
>
>
>  http://iridia.ulb.ac.be/~marchal/
>
>
>
>
> >
>

--~--~---------~--~----~------------~-------~--~----~
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Everything List" group.
To post to this group, send email to everything-list@googlegroups.com
To unsubscribe from this group, send email to 
everything-list+unsubscr...@googlegroups.com
For more options, visit this group at 
http://groups.google.com/group/everything-list?hl=en
-~----------~----~----~----~------~----~------~--~---

Reply via email to