It doesn't take free will to prove that every even number is divisible by
2.  How to prove a statement with a universal quantifier is pretty basic.

On Tue, May 29, 2012 at 12:01 PM, Aleksandr Lokshin <aaloks...@gmail.com>wrote:

> <<*The notion of "choosing" isn't actually important--if a proof says
> something like "pick an arbitrary member of the set X, and you will find it
> obeys Y", this is equivalent to the statement "every member of the set X
> obeys Y"*>>
> No, the logical operator  "every" contains the free will choice inside of
> it. I do insist that  one cannot consider an infinite set of onjects
> simultaneously!  Instead of so doing one considers an arbitraryly chosen
> object. It is a very specific mathematical operation . By using operator
> "every" we construct a formalism which hides the essens of matter - the
> using of a free will choice.
>
> On Tue, May 29, 2012 at 10:30 PM, meekerdb <meeke...@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>  On 5/29/2012 10:52 AMOne cannot, John Clark wrote:
>>
>>
>> On Sun, May 27, 2012  Aleksandr Lokshin <aaloks...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>  > All main mathematical notions ( such as infinity, variable, integer
>>> number) implicitly
>>> depend on the notion of free will.
>>
>>
>> Because nobody can explain what the ASCII string "free will" means the
>> above statement is of no value.
>>
>>  > A new approach to the Alan Turing problem (how to distinguish a
>>> person from an android) is also proposed ; this approach is based on the
>>> idea that an android cannot generate the notion of an arbitrary object.
>>>
>>
>> But "arbitrary" just means picking something for no reason or picking
>> something just because you like it but you like it for no reason; in other
>> words it means random. It's true that a pure Turing machine can not produce
>> randomness, however this limitation can be easily overcome by attaching a
>> very simple and cheap hardware random number generator to it.
>>
>>
>> Or by computing psuedo-random numbers with a sufficiently long period
>> that no one will be able to determine the algorithm.
>>
>> Brent
>>
>>
>>  Then the android could be as arbitrary as any arbitrary person, if you
>> think being arbitrary is a virtue that is.
>>
>>   John K Clark
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
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