On 5/29/2012 10:52 AM, John Clark wrote:

On Sun, May 27, 2012 Aleksandr Lokshin <aaloks...@gmail.com <mailto:aaloks...@gmail.com>> wrote:

    > All main mathematical notions ( such as infinity, variable, integer 
number) implicitly
depend on the notion of free will.

Because nobody can explain what the ASCII string "free will" means the above statement is of no value.

    > A new approach to the Alan Turing problem (how to distinguish a person 
from an
    android) is also proposed ; this approach is based on the idea that an 
android
    cannot generate the notion of an arbitrary object.


But "arbitrary" just means picking something for no reason or picking something just because you like it but you like it for no reason; in other words it means random. It's true that a pure Turing machine can not produce randomness, however this limitation can be easily overcome by attaching a very simple and cheap hardware random number generator to it.

Or by computing psuedo-random numbers with a sufficiently long period that no one will be able to determine the algorithm.

Brent

Then the android could be as arbitrary as any arbitrary person, if you think being arbitrary is a virtue that is.

  John K Clark






--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Everything List" group.
To post to this group, send email to everything-list@googlegroups.com.
To unsubscribe from this group, send email to 
everything-list+unsubscr...@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit this group at 
http://groups.google.com/group/everything-list?hl=en.

--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Everything List" group.
To post to this group, send email to everything-list@googlegroups.com.
To unsubscribe from this group, send email to 
everything-list+unsubscr...@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit this group at 
http://groups.google.com/group/everything-list?hl=en.

Reply via email to