Hi Roger,

On Sun, Oct 14, 2012 at 2:41 PM, Roger Clough <rclo...@verizon.net> wrote:

>
> Autopoesis is a useful definition for life.
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autopoiesis
>
>
> Autopoiesis (from Greek a?to- (auto-), meaning "self", and p???s??
> (poiesis), meaning "creation, production") literally means "self-creation"
> and expresses a fundamental dialectic among structure, mechanism and
> function. The term was introduced in 1972 by Chilean biologists Humberto
> Maturana and Francisco Varela:
>
> An autopoietic machine is a machine organized (defined as a unity) as a
> network of processes of production (transformation and destruction) of
> components
> which:
>
> (i) through their interactions and transformations continuously regenerate
> and realize the network of processes (relations) that produced them; and
>
> (ii) constitute it (the machine) as a concrete unity in space in which
> they (the components) exist by specifying the topological domain of its
> realization as such a network.[1]
>
> [...] the space defined by an autopoietic system is self-contained and
> cannot be described by using dimensions that define another space.
> When we refer to our interactions with a concrete autopoietic system,
> however, we project this system on the space of our manipulations and make a
> description of this projection.[2]
>
>
This seems to me more a description for machines/hallucinations that lack
flexibility; such as how media, politics, and market are framed in public
discourse. Like Luhmann said "they tend to be operationally closed".

The statement  above "continuously regenerate and realize the network of
processes (relations) that produced them" stands counter to
"transformations" which would indeed change "(ii) constitute it (the
machine) as a concrete unity in space in which they (the components) exist
by specifying the topological domain of its realization as such a
network.[1]", specifically the "concreteness" of the unity and the
discreetness of its domain is undermined by "transformation".

The original Greek definition, does ring a bell for creative processes and
dreaming however, but in an "operationally less bounded" sense.

m


>
> Roger Clough, rclo...@verizon.net
> 10/14/2012
> "Forever is a long time, especially near the end." -Woody Allen
>
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