Thanks, Jim! I appreciate your response, as always.
Yes, those unconscious expectations are doubtless the ones that got me -- just 
utterly shocked by how utterly physically shocked I was. It is not like I am 
unfamiliar with Fairfield Life! :-)

--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, doctordumbass@... <no_reply@...> wrote:
>
> Hi Rory! I am glad to hear all is OK with you. Yeah, expectations can be 
> tough to manage, especially when you are expecting friendliness, and get back 
> something else. I don't recall the exact ins and outs of the conversations 
> between you and Ravi, and Judy, so I'll just share my experience on 
> expectations. In my past career of managing and focusing teams on objectives, 
> I had to be very clear about my intentions before engaging others, to avoid 
> confusion, and a loss of momentum on the project. 
> 
> Like that, if I am clear on my intention, to spread love in the world, for 
> example, then I am also clear on what to do, should I encounter an obstacle. 
> I no longer assume anything beyond the moment itself. If I need more info, I 
> will ask for it. Other than that, it always seems to resolve into, "take it 
> easy, take it as it comes", without diminishing clarity, intention, or the 
> ability to modify my approach, instantly. No attachment.
> 
> As for your strategy in dealing with Judy and Ravi (arm's length), whatever 
> works, though I find, personally, that my curiosity always gets the better of 
> me - lol.
> 
> Thanks for sharing this with me, Rory! Hope you are chillin' today. 
> 
> --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, "RoryGoff" <rorygoff@> wrote:
> >
> > OK, I am genuinely curious, Jim -- I have always enjoyed respectful and 
> > heartfelt conversations with you, and you seem to understand Judy and Ravi. 
> >  I do get your saying Ravi "has a bug up his ass," but what boundary of 
> > Judy's did I cross, other than trying to have civil conversations with Turq 
> > and Ravi, to get anointed with "the most egregious ego I have ever seen," 
> > twice, followed by "Bullcrap" and "phony as a three-dollar bill"? In what 
> > way was this speaking my language? Again, on some levels this I find this 
> > very funny, but on others I do not.
> > 
> > What I have learned from it is to keep them both at arm's length, because 
> > after having opened my heart to them as true friends, the intense physical 
> > shock felt like an actual heart attack. 
> > 
> > As some of the symptoms persisted over several days I finally went to the 
> > clinic and they sent me to the ER, but the EKG, blood tests and lung X-rays 
> > (don't ask me why they felt those were necessary) came back clean, much to 
> > my and my wife's relief. 
> > 
> > Go figure!
> > 
> > *L*L*L*
> > 
> > --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, doctordumbass@ <no_reply@> wrote:
> > >
> > > Sometimes you must speak another person's language to communicate with 
> > > them. Maharishi said this, meet them at their level of consciousness, so 
> > > rather than going on and on about compassion and my fellow man, sometimes 
> > > a good go fuck yourself serves equally well. It is not said in judgment, 
> > > but rather in context. An attempt at behavioral modification, as would be 
> > > used on a very stubborn and angry adult child. It shows them immediately 
> > > that there is a boundary there. Not something one would expect to have to 
> > > do around adults, setting social boundaries, but some are childish in 
> > > their state of emotional development. Sorry if it looks ugly from the 
> > > outside, in, but not sorry enough to stop it, if necessary.
> > > 
> > > --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Share Long <sharelong60@> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > Judy and Xeno, I'm learning, especially here on FFL, that it's best 
> > > > NEVER to blast someone unkindly. Whether it's *important to* reminds me 
> > > > of something posted a few weeks ago: that evil takes over when good 
> > > > people become prideful. Furthermore, I think it's possible to express 
> > > > one's opinion, set boundaries, etc. without being unkind. Because 
> > > > really, exactly what does unkindness accomplish? Does it produce 
> > > > kindness in the abusive person? If so, then all I can say is that I 
> > > > have seen no empirical evidence of that here on FFL!
> > > > 
> > > > 
> > > > 
> > > > ________________________________
> > > >  From: authfriend <authfriend@>
> > > > To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
> > > > Sent: Sunday, August 18, 2013 9:46 PM
> > > > Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: Chopra nothing without Maharishi
> > > >  
> > > > 
> > > > 
> > > >   
> > > > --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, "Xenophaneros Anartaxius" 
> > > > <anartaxius@> wrote:
> > > > 
> > > > snip
> > > > 
> > > > That may well be true. I don't think one ought to blast
> > > > people unkindly unless one feels it's important. It isn't
> > > > something to be done casually or for fun.
> > > > 
> > > > > Getting blasted by Barry, and getting blasted by you are,
> > > > > for me, entirely different experiences. For me, that recent
> > > > > post to Share was the only one, of the ones of Barry's I
> > > > > have read recently that comes close to your intensity.
> > > > 
> > > > You've missed quite a few posts of his, it seems.
> > > > 
> > > > Did you see this one, for instance?
> > > > 
> > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/message/349106
> > > > 
> > > > (Actually this is my response, but Barry's post is
> > > > quoted in its entirety. Interestingly, not long
> > > > afterward, he decided he was going to go back to
> > > > not responding to his "enemies." Oh, BTW, below
> > > > Barry's post are my responses to two of yours,
> > > > which I'm not sure you saw either.)
> > > > 
> > > > Here's another (also with my response at the top):
> > > > 
> > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/message/349548
> > > > 
> > > > > It makes me wonder if somewhere in your life history your
> > > > > method of responding to people developed in response to
> > > > > some less than pleasant events, or it could a family
> > > > > characteristic.
> > > > 
> > > > Neither, sorry to disappoint you. Maybe I was just lucky,
> > > > but until I started posting to electronic forums 25 or
> > > > so years ago, I'd never encountered this kind of
> > > > intellectual and factual dishonesty and gratuitous
> > > > obnoxiousness. (You can call that a "less than pleasant
> > > > event" if you like, but somehow I don't think it's what
> > > > you had in mind.)
> > > > 
> > > > > Some people seem inclined to confrontation and argument
> > > > > more than others. So in reply to your last comment, aside
> > > > > from the question I asked about percentages, I do think
> > > > > you are confrontational and accusatory. I am stating this
> > > > > as if it were a fact. But the other side of the coin is,
> > > > > do you think yourself that you are this way or not?
> > > > 
> > > > When I think it's appropriate, yes indeed. (The difference
> > > > between you and me in that regard is that I'm honest
> > > > about it.)
> > > > 
> > > > > Do the people on the forum who are generally favourable to
> > > > > you think you are confrontational and accusatory? There
> > > > > would seem to be a range of opinion on this issue.
> > > > 
> > > > I guess you've thought more about it than I have. It's not
> > > > something I'm concerned about. You probably should ask
> > > > the folks you have in mind.
> > > > 
> > > > > I would assume that those who thought you were would tend
> > > > > to be more favourable in Barry's direction, and those who
> > > > > felt you were not would not be favourable to Barry, and
> > > > > even if they thought you were confrontational and accusatory,
> > > > > would feel it was justified as you championed ideas and an
> > > > > outlook on life they were more comfortable with.
> > > > 
> > > > I have no idea what your point is here. I think people react
> > > > to Barry as individuals, not because of how I react to him.
> > > > 
> > > > Maybe you're the exception, though.
> > > >
> > >
> >
>


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