I would try using that to figure out a way of maping the sounds and then translate that to your project. You are able to see the wave forms in soundbooth? Haven't used it. If so, can you run your cursor over it at any point to get the readings? Might be a little trivial, but may yeild a pattern that you can utilize.

JAT

Karl

Sent from losPhone

On Jun 3, 2010, at 6:18 PM, "Eric E. Dolecki" <edole...@gmail.com> wrote:

SoundBooth

On Thu, Jun 3, 2010 at 6:39 PM, Karl DeSaulniers <k...@designdrumm.com>wrote:

Do you have SoundEdit? Or the like?


Karl



On Jun 3, 2010, at 5:09 PM, Eric E. Dolecki wrote:

I think I might make waveform bitmaps and then try and compare against the
current waveform (block EQ) - and if it's a close match, then fire off specific vowel events. If that works, I could do consonants too. If this
works, I'll do jumping jacks and shots of Jack.

So how would I compare two bitmaps to see if a waveform (
On Thu, Jun 3, 2010 at 5:18 PM, Karl DeSaulniers <k...@designdrumm.com
wrote:

If you need any of these files or can't find them, lmk and I can send off
list.

Best,

Karl



On Jun 3, 2010, at 3:37 PM, Karl DeSaulniers wrote:

Don't know if this will help, but have you looked into WaveAnalyzer.as
or

Flash MX - Audio: Sound completion event (The source files for this can
be
found in the Flash MX/Samples folder.)
They both let you control the sound. I am thinking this will point you
in
a good direction. Its AS2 though.

HTH,

Karl


On Jun 3, 2010, at 2:42 PM, Eric E. Dolecki wrote:

Ya - I have the data for both things, but they extend over time and are

difficult to compare. It's the boiling down the signatures into
something
simple and being able to read the playing audio looking for the match
(or
near match). I thought about using bitmap data and trying to match up waveforms, etc. but I don't know enough about it to pull that off. It
seems
like a hack in a way, but if it worked, who cares I suppose.

On Thu, Jun 3, 2010 at 3:31 PM, Juan Pablo Califano <
califa010.flashcod...@gmail.com> wrote:



I'm not Henrik, but I've done some lip-synch stuff for Disney. We
did
it pretty much the way Eric described--we just used amplitude. It's not as accurate as Disney would demand on a film, but it's ok in the
kids' game market.



I see, amplitudes could be just good enough for some stuff.

Although the "speed" and the intensitiy of the speech could give
misleading
results, I think. I'm under the impression that you should somehow try
to
compare the shape of the waves (somehow simplifiy your input to some
value
of sets of values that are easier to compare, possibly in a "time
window")
and compare it in some meaningful way to precalculated samples to find
a
matching pattern. That's the part I have no clue about!

Cheers
Juan Pablo Califano

2010/6/3 Kerry Thompson <al...@cyberiantiger.biz>

Juan Pablo Califano wrote:


Wow. That was really uncalled for.



That was my reaction, too. I didn't see Eric as complaining-- just
asking. Maybe Henrik was just having a bad day.

For me, the hard part, which you seem to imply is rather simple
here,


is


*matching+ the input audio against said profiles. Admitedly, I don't


know


anything about digital signal processing and audio programming in


general,

but "matching" sounds a bit vague. Perhaps you could enlighten us, I

you


feel like.



I'm not Henrik, but I've done some lip-synch stuff for Disney. We did it pretty much the way Eric described--we just used amplitude. It's not as accurate as Disney would demand on a film, but it's ok in the
kids' game market.

Doing something more accurate would probably involve at least 6 mouth positions, and if you're doing it in real time, you'd have to do a
reverse FFT. It can be done--there was a really good commercial
lip-synch program that generated Action Script to control mouth
positions. I don't know if it's still around--that was 5 years ago, and it was pretty expensive (about $2,500 for one seat, I think). It may even have been a Director Xtra that worked with a Flash Sprite,
but let's not talk about Director :-P

Cordially,

Kerry Thompson
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