Hi Damien,
All too true I'm a fraid. Security is actually one of the many reasons why I want to begin distancing myself from .NET based code after Mysteries of the Ancients is released. It is a nice API, got really nice languages, but it also has its fair share of security problems as well. The major security issue with these runtime languages like Java and .NET is instead of being compiled to a native binary, as happens with a C++ application, they are compiled to an intermediate layer runtime language, I.L. Code, which can be easily reverse engineered by anyone who has the proper disassemblers and know how to pull it off. While obfuscation helps scramble the I.L. code that is still no absolute guarantee that someone can't crack that layer of protection too. The other major hangup with the .NET languages is even though Windows Vista comes with .NET 3.0 and Windows 7 comes with .NET 4.0 there are still other managed libraries that don't come with the operating system such as Managed DirectX, the XNA Framework, or SlimDX for example. This results in the end user to install these missing components and to trouble shoot what managed libraries are missing for your game or application, and to upgrade and install them accordingly. With C++ you often don't have this sort of problem. If you have a C++ application and it supports DirectX 8 then the API is already there on your system. Just install the game and go. No need to fool around upgrading DirectX or hunting down missing managed libraries and components. Of course if you use the XNA libraries for C++ you may have to install those, but you can easily get them via the Windows update service. Then, there is the target platform issue with the express versions of the .NET IDEs. If you use Visual Basic Express or Visual C# Express it won't allow you to change the target platform. It defaults to an AnyCPU setting which won't work on X64 systems if you link to a 32 byt managed library like the XNA Framework, Managed DirectX, etc. You have to get the Visual Studio Professional version to be able to change the target platform in the IDE which sort of sucks seeing as X64 processors are more popular than ever these days. With any C++ IDE Visual C++, gcc, whatever it defaults to X86 which will run on X86 or X64 systems.


Damien C. Sadler wrote:
Hi Thomas,
I decided against the .net framework for several reasons.
For a start, I could never get to grips with the IDE interface.
For a second I always had trouble with .net based interfaces, as screenreaders sometimes cannot recognise the class of the control that is in focus. For example, it might just say OK instead of OK Button. Although this doesn't hold true for games, with them being entirely audio based, there's still the IDE. Then there's the fact that .net software's code can be hacked into unless you use some form of obfuscation. According to a friend who also used vb.net on a temporary basis, there is a piece of software out there that can decompile .net based software. I don't know if that is because of the fact that most of the application is referencing different class objects, but nevertheless I wouldn't want to go down that road if I knew that my software could be hacked.
Regards,
Damien.




----- Original Message ----- From: "Thomas Ward" <thomasward1...@gmail.com>
To: "Gamers Discussion list" <gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Saturday, December 05, 2009 3:28 AM
Subject: Re: [Audyssey] X-Sight Interactive news


Hi Damien,
Yeah, I have the same problem here. Even though I had C++ in college and have used it for some Linux software development once I began using C# .NET for game development it is hard to go back to C++. Although, one of my projects, USA Raceway, is actually being written in C++, and just feels wierd not being able to depend on the .NET Framework for the better string classes etc.


Damien C. Sadler wrote:
Hi Thomas,
That's just what my recommender told me. That's why I have completely removed VB from my system so's I don't get tempted with my old ways again *smile*.
Regards,
Damien.


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