Hi Michael,

Well, the majority of PC games aren't directly developed for Mac or
Linux, but those that are considered to be Mac/Linux compatible are
often played using a commercial emulator like Transgamings Cider and
Cediga. Transgaming has a huge list of PC games that have been tested
with their Mac and Linux game emulators, and EA Games, Activision, and
several other mainstream game companies mention Cider or Cediga in
their documentation for Mac/Linux compatibility. Its just a way of
quickly targeting those platforms without having to rewrite there
software.

That said, the majority of commercial games for Mac and Linux such as
Quake use SDL for keyboard, mouse, and joystick input, OpenGL for 3d
graphics, and OpenAL for 3d audio support. Its not DirectX, but with
OpenGL and OpenAL doing the graphics and audio you can get pretty
close on non-Windows PCs.In fact, the forementioned emulators above
basically emulate DirectX behavior by rendering the graphics behind
the scenes with OpenGL and rendering audio with OpenAL because they
are the closest matches to Direct3D and DirectSound. So if I were
writing a comercial game for Mac OS or Linux that's probably what I
would use as well.

One other note. FMOD Ex is a comercial audio API for Mac, Linux, and
Windows. I've noticed on Firelight's website that several mainstream
companies have licensed FMOD for their game engines and use it for
cross-platform audio development. So I would say that FMOD is the
number one alternative to OpenAL for game companies who can afford the
licensing for FMOD and want to write cross-platform games.

Cheers!


On 12/3/11, Michael Gauler <michael.gau...@gmx.de> wrote:
> Hi Thomas,
> I have a few questions here.
> Since you talked about open source things like SDL and such I'd like to know
> what mainstream games for Mac or Linux use.
> They obviously don't have DirectX components, but if a a 3D first person
> shooter is created or ported to something non windows, there must be
> alternatives for the programmers.
> They could create their own sound libraries or use propritary ones.
> But the question remains what they use. And even if mainstream games do have
> graphics to look for doors or hallways this doesn't necessarily mean that
> the positioning of the audio related to said objects has to be only
> approximately near the spot. In many mainstream games it is as precise as
> you need it for your games or like in Shades of Doom.
> Since Mac and linux are not one or two years old, there must be ways to
> technically deal with better game controller support or better audio
> handling.
> Thus I'd like to know what other companies or programmers use when it comes
> to either cross platform porting of their games or when a game is directly
> developed for a non windows operating system.
>
>
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