Now that we know this, git-bisect is exactly the tool he needs! He
specifies the last known commit without the bug, and the first known commit
with the bug. Git will then choose intermediate commits for you to test if
the bug still exists, and point you to the first bad one.

Hope that helps.
On 10 Jun 2014 22:55, "John Fisher" <fishook2...@gmail.com> wrote:

>
>
> On Tuesday, June 10, 2014 11:55:04 AM UTC-7, Dale Worley wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> I think what will work is:
>>
>> 1) Find the first commit before the tag that has a different content
>> for the file:
>>
>> $ git log -n 1 <tagname>^ -- <filename>
>> commit b3282e06e39e1ddaa44806eadbfac06a19fabe09
>> ...
>>
>> 2) Find the SHA of the file as it is in that commit
>>
>> $ git ls-tree <commit> -- <filename>
>> 100644 blob <filehash>        <filename>
>>
>> 3) Get the contents of the file within that commit
>>
>> $ git cat-file blob <filehash>
>>
>> Dale
>>
>
> Yes thats what he wants, I think. He'll use it to step back through
> commits to see when a bug was introduced.
>
> I still don't understand what the commit-SHA given out by git ls-tree is
> for? If it doesn't correspond to a commit on the file as seen in git log,
> what's it used for?
>
> thanks.
>
>
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